Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1.    #1  
    Dears,

    I really need to replace my treo 180 battery. I am a business man and get a lot of phone calls one day. The battery of treo 180 can not survive one day even if I update the software to new version 1.0.

    Does anyone have any idea about how to select a more power battery to replace it?

    Thanks,
  2. Quake97's Avatar
    Posts
    557 Posts
    Global Posts
    598 Global Posts
    #2  
    I'm sorry, you cannot replace the battery in the Treo. Like every PDA, its built in. I heard the battery in the 270 is better. You might want to consider one of the new smartphones coming out soon because I think the Samsung and Kyocera have replacable batteries.

    Why not get a car charger and additonal chargers to place around where you go so you can charge more frequently.

    Joe
  3. #3  
    Try one of those devices that lets you power or recharge your treo with an external 9V battery. They look fairly compact and you can carry around or buy as many 9V batteries as you want when you are on travel. You can even get rechargables!
  4. #4  
    So basically what you guys are saying is that once the battery dies in the Treo, the phone will be useless and would get discarded. That is kind of ridiculous for a $700 phone to be discarded just because the battery is dead and that too in what approx 500 recharges, which amounts to only about 1 & 1/2 yrs to 2 yrs of use.
    I am sure there must be a way to replace the battery, it may not be user replaceable but still a service center ought to be able to. Does anyone have any ideas about this? Maybe we should ask Handspring this question.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by Sanjay
    So basically what you guys are saying is that once the battery dies in the Treo, the phone will be useless and would get discarded. That is kind of ridiculous for a $700 phone to be discarded just because the battery is dead and that too in what approx 500 recharges, which amounts to only about 1 & 1/2 yrs to 2 yrs of use.
    I am sure there must be a way to replace the battery, it may not be user replaceable but still a service center ought to be able to. Does anyone have any ideas about this? Maybe we should ask Handspring this question.
    You send it in and it costs $150.00 (I think) AND (?) I think, again, that they send you a refurb and that is it. OR maybe they send you a loaner during the repair(?)

    The only part I sure of is that it is not a paperweight, it does get fixed.


    Hope this helps


    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7
  6. #6  
    Anyone that has bought a Treo is clearly an early adopter. You think you won't want the next "great thing" in a year and half? For me, it's a habit, which I know I can't kick, so I don't let it bug me.
  7. #7  
    timmeng, get a cradle or other dedicated charger for work and keep your treo in there when not in use, while at your desk. Not only will this keep it charged but it will give you easy access to any information you may have on there.


    As far as the "500 charges" rating, that is not real life. Li-on batteries have a short life if they are always fully discharged and recharged. You should normally keep them on the charger, use them a little, etc, and they will last many, many years. Yes, this is the opposite as you were trained for Ni-Cd batteries.

    Keep a cradle at home and work, and leave your cell phone of any type on there when you're there. You'll never complain about battery life again.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    Anyone that has bought a Treo is clearly an early adopter. You think you won't want the next "great thing" in a year and half? For me, it's a habit, which I know I can't kick, so I don't let it bug me.
    The key to my decision to buy the Treo 180 when it first came out was my belief that it would be 12+ months before somebody came out with the system I'm REALLY waiting for; I wanted to start the clock on my 1.5 yrs so I wouldn't feel guilty on the next purchase at that time!!
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by jwardell

    As far as the "500 charges" rating, that is not real life. Li-on batteries have a short life if they are always fully discharged and recharged. You should normally keep them on the charger, use them a little, etc, and they will last many, many years. Yes, this is the opposite as you were trained for Ni-Cd batteries.
    Whoa, is this true? I would have assumed the exact opposite!

    For example, if you have a laptop, you will basically destroy the battery by leaving it plugged in all the time. To avoid this you need to either discharge occassionally or remove the battery when running on AC for long periods of time.

    Are you saying we should keep the Treo "topped off", rather than draining it and then charging?

    Is this documented anywhere by Handspring?
  10. mrjoec's Avatar
    Posts
    369 Posts
    Global Posts
    384 Global Posts
    #10  
    Any device with a Li-Ion battery, whether it be a laptop, a pda, or a phone, or whatever, should be topped off whenever possible. You should avoid fully draining it at all, if possible. This is, of course, the opposite of every other rechargeable battery that came before it, but it is true, nonetheless.

    Why that simple information isn't made more publicly available, I have no idea. But the bottom line is that if you have Li-Ion batteries, you should always keep them charged.

    And, by the way, Li-Ion chargers are "smart" in that they stop charging as soon as the battery is full. So there is no danger of overcharging them. Keep the laptop plugged in for a month, if you want; you won't do any harm to your battery. You'll do a lot more harm by discharging it fully every once in a while, as your older Ni-Cad laptop recommended.
    mrjoec
    www.joecieplinski.com
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by jchristopher
    Whoa, is this true? I would have assumed the exact opposite!
    Yup--see you've been trained to completely drain the batteries because of what the industry spent years training you to do with NiCads... Now the opposite is true. Not only does lithium ion have a MUCH higher capacity, it is much easier to use and has no memory effects...now you know why I won't buy an electronic product without it!
  12.    #12  
    Dears,

    Thank you all for your good advice. But because I don't have any free time to charge my treo on day time, I decide to change it with a battery of Motorola. I have uncoved my treo 180, and found is are no any more space to put a more powerful battery in it. I will stick this battery on the back of the cover of my treo180.

    The battery I will use is 3.7V and 1100MAH which is used in Motorola A380 in China.

    I wonder whether some guys help to unscrew his treo 270 back cover to find which model of battery in it.
  13. #13  
    Now wait just a second. I've just done quite a bit of reading about Li-Ion batteries. Everything I've read says they can endure about 400-500 charging cycles before needing replacement.

    If we follow the previous poster's advice of constantly leaving the Treo in the cradle we are going to use up those 400 cycles, very, very fast.

    It would seem to be better to run it down to almost nothing, ,before charging back up fully in order to conserve the finite number of cycles, yes?
  14. dbasham's Avatar
    Posts
    88 Posts
    Global Posts
    115 Global Posts
    #14  
    OK now I don't know what to believe either. I did a little research at a few battery Web sites and they ALL say to fully discharge all battery types occasionally for proper maintenance (NiCad, NiMH and Li-Ion). I know that Li-Ion batteries don't have memory and have a MUCH higher density than other types but beyond that I can't discern a difference based on limited research. Can the folks that are suggesting CONSTANT charging point to a Web site that validates this? Thanks,
    --Denny
  15. #15  
    This is good knowledge to have...I would really like to know whether this Li Ion battery thing is true
  16. dbasham's Avatar
    Posts
    88 Posts
    Global Posts
    115 Global Posts
    #16  
    Me too. There were a bunch of sites out there that described cops using walkie talkies (or something like that) where they were constantly charging them and the batteries lasted less than a year. On the other hand construction guys using the same radios left them on all the time and only recharged them when they got down to nothing. These batteries ended up lasting 4+ years.

    So basically most of the Web sites recommended a frequent deep discharge (sounds like a disease symptom) to maintain the healthy life of your battery. I assume that this basic rule is what we are debating right now. Perhaps we should move this into a general forum to pickup comments from other users.

    This needs to be settled because the last thing I want to do is pay $120 a year from now for a new battery.
    --Denny
  17. #17  
    AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $The$ $500$ $cycles$ $refer$ $to$ $0$ $charge$ $to$ $full$ $charge$ ($one$ $cycle$). $A$ $cycle$ $is$ $not$ $calculated$ $by$ $how$ $manny$ $times$ $you$ $put$ $your$ $unit$ $to$ $charge$. $It$ $is$ $doubtful$ $that$ $leaving$ $the$ $unit$ $on$ $the$ $cradle$ $to$ $charge$ $would$ $have$ $little$ $if$ $any$ $effect$ $on$ $the$ $battery$ $life$.

    Originally posted by jchristopher
    Now wait just a second. I've just done quite a bit of reading about Li-Ion batteries. Everything I've read says they can endure about 400-500 charging cycles before needing replacement.

    If we follow the previous poster's advice of constantly leaving the Treo in the cradle we are going to use up those 400 cycles, very, very fast.

    It would seem to be better to run it down to almost nothing, ,before charging back up fully in order to conserve the finite number of cycles, yes?
  18. #18  
    From what I've gathered from Usenet, it frankly doesn't matter when you recharge it. But it does seem bad to let the battery run all the way down. Fortunately there are chips in modern LION batteries to prevent this.
  19. mrjoec's Avatar
    Posts
    369 Posts
    Global Posts
    384 Global Posts
    #19  
    I've been a laptop owner for several years now, and ever since the batteries went Li-Ion, I've been leaving them plugged in whenever I could. My original PowerBook G3 had two Li-Ion batteries, and I used to keep them both in and plugged into the wall about 70% of the time (I only went on the road with it once or twice a week). Three-and-a-half years later, both batteries are still running in top shape, though I now leave it plugged in 99% of the time, because I hardly ever use it anymore (replaced it with a Titanium G4).

    I don't know about other people's experiences. But from my own, I can say pretty confidently that there's no negative effect to keeping the battery charged whenever possible. Maybe not all Li-Ion batteries are of the same quality. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if some manufacturers used cheaper batteries than others, which run out in a year regardless of how you treat them.

    The only question is, how good is the battery in the Treo?
    mrjoec
    www.joecieplinski.com

Posting Permissions