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  1.    #1  
    BaseJet (www.basejet.com) has released a new beta of their software that does true push email to the Treo. I've been testing it for a couple days. It's a little unreliable, but when it works it works well. It has good attachment support and you can have email conversations in near real-time.

    How it works:

    A desktop client (or a full server ala Blackberry Enterprise Server) is installed on your local machine (or LAN).

    This client (or server) scans your mailbox. When a message lands in it, an SMS is sent to your handheld. The handheld receives this and the BaseJet software on the handheld recognizes this and dials-up to download your mail. It then disconnects and you can read, reply, and compose messages offline. Then click refresh to synch up, or let em sit for the next push synch.

    The main problem I've had so far is that sometimes it just quits working. I go in and fiddle with the settings on the desktop client and off it goes again. But even with this hassle it sure is encouraging. I'm working on replacing a VisorPhone + Blackberry combo that I'm carrying now with the Treo. If they get this right soon I'll be able to hang up the blackberry.
  2. #2  
    This program seem to have a lot of potential. It is defintely superior to Treo Mail in terms of feature sets. Then again, so is Corsoft Aileron.
  3.    #3  
    I haven't checked corsoft's solution yet. Can anyone compare this to basejet? Same thing? Better? Is Corsoft push? Thanks.
  4. #4  
    I gave them both a trial period Robert1 and found them to be similar in their approach. While no expert in their internal implementation, as a reasonably experienced user (and by perusing their web sites) I was able to pretty well determine how they work. Basejet was in an earlier beta at the time of my comparisons (Apr-May timeframe) and didn't perform as consistently as Aileron. The two systems generally work as follows:

    1. You initiate an email check.
    2. The email software actually communicates with the Basejet or Coresoft site, and their site performs the actual POP3 communication with your inbox.
    3. Your email is pulled into Basejet's or Coresoft's system, attachments are converted into your chosen Palm equivalent program formats, then sent to your palm inbox.

    Both systems are pull type. They require you to pulse them and ask to check your mail. Both systems' software allowed you to schedule regular mail checks (like most desktop-based emial programs do), so that the mail is waiting for you in your inbox when you have the time to check it. Depending on how often you schedule checks, you could eat up a lot a minutes checking empty POP3 accounts.

    The only push I am aware of in these systems is their ability to "message" you if they detect new email in your POP3 account. They will SMS you (or alert you) so that you can then initiate a POP3 account "pull." Again, unless you have a liberal messaging system in your call plan, this could cost you for the 30-40 emails you might receive in a day.

    Hope that helps a little.

    Kupe
  5.    #5  
    [i]
    The only push I am aware of in these systems is their ability to "message" you if they detect new email in your POP3 account. They will SMS you (or alert you) so that you can then initiate a POP3 account "pull." Again, unless you have a liberal messaging system in your call plan, this could cost you for the 30-40 emails you might receive in a day.

    Kupe [/B]
    Well, BaseJet must've improved things since you checked it. It's pretty close to push now. Well maybe Push-then-auto-pull.

    It works by sending an SMS when you have new mail. BaseJet on the handheld is scanning for incoming SMSes (I guess) and when it sees one of addressed to BaseJet it initiates a wireless synch. (a pull). But since this all happens in the background, from the user's perspective it was a push. The email wound up on my device and I didn't have to do anything. It beeps when it's done with it's synch so that's when I check.
  6. #6  
    That is different than the version I used Robert1 - and you're right, that is much closer to push that what I experienced. A nice touch on their part, but the alerts can really ring up the cell bill.

    Kupe
  7. #7  
    I like the whole BaseJet thing as an email program, but is there a way to make it check a POP3 server directly.

    When I am at my desk and I do a Sync, it is great that it collects all the email out of my mailbox, but when connected to the internet through a wireless modem (Treo 270), how do I get it to just collect my email without having to setup gateways etc.

    Can anybody help?
  8.    #8  
    I don't know about POP3 integration. It's designed to forward email from a corporate system like Outlook or Notes.
  9. #9  
    Yes. An e-mail client that probes the pop3 server directly would be nice. No need to install any software to your desktop. I do not see how hard it would be for MarkSpace and other Palm OS Mail developers to put in an auto-checker into the clients. Most desktop mail clients does this. An app like this would be a killer when GPRS is ready.

    Originally posted by eamler
    I like the whole BaseJet thing as an email program, but is there a way to make it check a POP3 server directly.

    When I am at my desk and I do a Sync, it is great that it collects all the email out of my mailbox, but when connected to the internet through a wireless modem (Treo 270), how do I get it to just collect my email without having to setup gateways etc.

    Can anybody help?

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