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  1.    #1  
    I see notices on other providers that they will be supporting CDMA 2000 like Sprint, including Verizon (to whom I am sold for a year).
    Will it be possible for myself to buy a CDMA Treo outright and have it programmed for Verizon's system?

    BTW: Given the installed base of CDMA vs GSM, why not roll out the CDMA version first (same question for the VisorPhone)?


    Thanks, Craig,
    Last edited by Craig Wadsworth; 06/13/2002 at 07:36 PM.
  2. #2  
    While "No" is not the best answer, I'd hazard a guess that "Not likely" is the best answer....

    On the Samsung I300 board, we've had people trying to activate the I300 on other networks ever since it was released back in November. Just this past week one person finally got it working on a Canadian provider. It was no small task - apparently the most important hurdle(s) being getting a completely new PRL programmed onto the phone (not something your average joe is likely able to do) and having someone who can activate the ESN in the carrier's system.

    So ... if you really really really really really really knew what you were doing, and had all the right tools, and had the right contacts within Verizon....

    ...you might be able to activate it.

    But that's just my opinion. I could be dead wrong.

    Sadly, SprintPCS paid Handspring an added bonus in order to be the exclusive carrier of the CDMA Treo for an unknown time.

    -Doug
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by Craig Wadsworth
    IBTW: Given the installed base of CDMA vs GSM, why not roll out the CDMA version first (same question for the VisorPhone)?
    Worldwide, the installed base of CDMA users is dwarfed by the installed base of GSM users, which is the dominant mode outside North America. Handspring wisely (for its purposes) chose to focus its development on one basic model which could be used everywhere. Unfortunately, that leaves US users stuck with Voicestream of Cingular until the Sprint CDMA version comes out.
  4. #4  
    According to a Pen Computing article published around the release of the VisorPhone, a Handspring rep said the main reason for releasing a GSM product first was that CDMA providers were too large to consider cobranding with the startup (Handspring had 40 employees). It was also easier to package the service with the product: since there is only one GSM provider per region, there's only one service to bundle the product with at the time you order. CDMA services tend to overlap.
  5. #5  
    Is CDMA something that's usable in Europe? What are the advantages/disadvantages compared to GSM?

    Thanks, greetings, Roel.
  6. #6  
    No, the CDMA Treo is not useable in Europe, which is almost entirely covered by GSM. Why would you want one anyways? With GSM coverage being as extensive as it is in Europe and the ability to seamlessly switch from phone to phone by simply moving a little card, why would you want anything else? The advantages/disadvantages of GSM vs. CDMA have been discussed extensively on this board. I would try running a search for your answer first then if you still have questions, post again.
  7. dbasham's Avatar
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    #7  
    Hey Folks,

    Just discovered this board and it is great. Considering a Treo 270 but not sure whether I should wait a couple of months.

    Regarding this post I did see that AT&T is planning to switch over to GSM in the near future (in the process of roll-out and testing right now) so I was wondering how this affects the limitations imposed by VS and Cingular. Anyone think that AT&T will support this phone. Not understanding GSM too well I assume that once they switch over this phone should work on their network but I just wonder whether you could switch over to AT&T service. Interesting.
    --Denny
  8. #8  
    If ATT end up using a GSM 1900 Mhz network liek the one they have in Canada with the Rogers/ATT partnership, then there is no reason why the GSM Treo would not work no it. It is my understanding that ATT is making a transition from TDMA (same in Canada). Neither the CDMA or GSM Treo would work on this network.
  9. Q
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    #9  
    Originally posted by yardie
    If ATT end up using a GSM 1900 Mhz network liek the one they have in Canada with the Rogers/ATT partnership, then there is no reason why the GSM Treo would not work no it. It is my understanding that ATT is making a transition from TDMA (same in Canada). Neither the CDMA or GSM Treo would work on this network.
    Interesting... especially since until now, even if two companies used the same technology, their networks weren't compatible. You can't take a QCP-6035 and switch from Verizon to Sprint, for instance (at least, not unless you have the expertise to change the settings/replace components so it will work). Same for phones on AT&T and Cingular's TDMA networks. Is it because AT&T, Cingular and VoiceStream will be sharing a GSM network?
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by Q

    Interesting... especially since until now, even if two companies used the same technology, their networks weren't compatible. You can't take a QCP-6035 and switch from Verizon to Sprint, for instance (at least, not unless you have the expertise to change the settings/replace components so it will work). Same for phones on AT&T and Cingular's TDMA networks. Is it because AT&T, Cingular and VoiceStream will be sharing a GSM network?
    The way GSM works is that it utilizes a SIM card that carries the subscribers info among other things on the small card. Simply take the SIM card and place it in another GSM phone and in most instances, you're good to go (there are exceptions of course).

    As for the 6035, when it was the only PalmOS smartphone around, a quite popular thing to do was to take a Sprint 6035 and reprogram it for Verizon service using a set of instructions widely available on the internet. No hardware changes were necessary. AT&T, Cingular, and Voicestream each have their own network although they do share the same network in a very few areas.
  11. dbasham's Avatar
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    #11  
    The biggest question is once AT&T switches over to GSM will they "in theory" be able to support the Treo. I say "in theory" because I once wasted about 2 weeks trying to get AT&T to authorize a non-locked Nokia 7160 phone that was definitely capable of working on their network. I know it worked since I was able to dial 611 and get them. They never did allow it because the ESN was not in their database.

    I mention AT&T because they have always had the best coverage IMHO. That would be the best of both worlds because I don't have that much confidence in Voicesteams network.
    --Denny
  12. #12  
    Don't forget that AT&T's current GSM/GPRS network is only in its infancy right now and as such coverage is no where near that of its TDMA network, or even Voicestream's GSM network for that matter. So just so you realize, in the event you do get a Treo to work on AT&T's GSM network, coverage will be no where close to that of the extensive AT&T TDMA network that works so well for you. It takes time to build a network from scratch (look at Sprint, people still complain about their coverage and they've been around for some time now) so by the time AT&T gets their network to the point where its as extensive as their TDMA network, the Treo will probably be outdated technology by then. Cingular won't be done until 2004, I can't imagine AT&T getting done any quicker...
  13. #13  
    A Verizon employee in New York City told me during the first week in June that Verizon Wireless is currently testing the CDMA Treo for use on the Verizon network. He said he expected Verizon to carry it in order to be competitive with Sprint. Take it for what it's worth.
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by Marty1781
    No, the CDMA Treo is not useable in Europe, which is almost entirely covered by GSM. Why would you want one anyways? With GSM coverage being as extensive as it is in Europe and the ability to seamlessly switch from phone to phone by simply moving a little card, why would you want anything else? The advantages/disadvantages of GSM vs. CDMA have been discussed extensively on this board. I would try running a search for your answer first then if you still have questions, post again.
    Marty,
    Europe can use CDMA as a technology but it will be quite difficult. NATO and other peacekeeping forces in Europe use the spectrum required for CDMA (both IS-95 and CDMA2000). Eventually, NATO and everyone else will move from their current spectrum. When that happens CDMA could be an option, but it would be playing catch-up with WCDMA.
    Interestingly enough, the same principal applies to the USA and the GSM carriers. Our military and other national offices are using the spectrum necessary for WCDMA. So the GSM and GPRS carriers in the USA are not going to be able to migrate to their 3G networks until something major happens with the government. And as I am sure you all know, nothing is the only happening with spectrum talks from the White House. Who know, maybe George Bush owns a good portion of Sprint PCS.


    homer
  15. #15  
    Yes, I'm aware of this. However, I responded in the manner that I did because I didn't think that information had any relevance to the poster. From the nature of the question, I didn't think providing that information would have served much purpose to the poster except only to possibly confuse him so I just told him only what I thought he needed to know.
    Last edited by Marty1781; 07/02/2002 at 03:57 PM.
  16. #16  
    Dude, relax. I am not telling you that you are wrong or trying to add anything to your post. I was just tyring to confirm and support you.


    homer
  17. #17  
    Relax, I know I did not mean to sound defensive. Sorry if I gave that impression, it was not my intent
    Last edited by Marty1781; 07/03/2002 at 12:52 PM.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by Craig Wadsworth
    I see notices on other providers that they will be supporting CDMA 2000 like Sprint, including Verizon (to whom I am sold for a year).
    Will it be possible for myself to buy a CDMA Treo outright and have it programmed for Verizon's system?

    BTW: Given the installed base of CDMA vs GSM, why not roll out the CDMA version first (same question for the VisorPhone)?


    Thanks, Craig,
    Unfortunately your answer is a definate NO. Sorry to be the bearer of the bad news, I already tried that route because Sprints coverage/rates out here in CA are pathetic. I was going to buy one and pay to have it unlocked but found out that Sprint has a chip put in all of their phones so they will not work with other CDMA networks. I don't think reprograming works in this situation but I could be wrong.

    Verizon will have to come up with their own and not to refute an earlier post... but, Sprint has paid some big bucks to HS to be the Exculsive CDMA carrier of the Treo in the US. I guess that means Verizion won't have it for a while.

    By the time Verizion has it there will most likely be something much cooler out.

    Good luck,

    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7
  19. #19  
    I know a Sprint 6035 can be reprogrammed to work on Verizon's network but I suspect Kyocera knew both carriers would use this phone so they made sure one carrier could not have exlusive access to it. Also, there are a couple of people over at www.sphi300.com who have reprogrammed their Sprint Samsung I300s to work on other carriers, including Verizon. However, all this is really pointless. The Treo 300 is a single-band/single-mode only phone that operates on CDMA 1900 only. Since a very significant portion of Verizon's network uses CDMA 800, you would have absolutely no coverage in those areas with the Treo 300.
  20. #20  
    Single band only!?!?

    With Sprint?!?!


    Don't even think of buying one in CA.


    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7

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