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  1.    #1  
    Now that there's a wireless, color, phone-enabled Palm device, I am considering the Treo.

    I'd like to know: How is web browsing on the Treo series?

    I wouldn't want it for "surfing," but I would like to have access to informational sites like Yahoo! Yellow Pages and Map Quest.

    Cheers,

    Mike...
    Last edited by OtakuVidiot; 05/28/2002 at 09:25 AM.
  2. #2  
    See this thread http://discussion.treocentral.com/tc...threadid=23585

    You can access a mobile version of all the sites you mentioned n your post with the browser. You can see some of the mobile sites out there here: http://mymobilestuff.com/palm
  3. #3  
    In addition to what Yardie says... I think it works great for ANY standard web page. Perhaps a bit slow with the current config... but when that GPRS gets rolling...

    Yee Ha!

    Waiting impatiently for my COLOR :->

    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7
  4. #4  
    On the Kyocera I always use the text-based EudoraWeb, which is great for getting information like news, weather, stock quotes, etc.

    Blazer is definitely prettier, but a child could grow up while waiting for a page to load at 9600 baud. I only enjoy it on the Prism with the 56k Xircom landline modem. I'll switch when the high-speed networks are finally online.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by Gameboy70
    I'll switch when the high-speed networks are finally online.
    GPRS will only be at 14.4kbps, right? That's not much faster than 9600.
  6. #6  
    Roswords,

    Yiou keep quoting this 14.4 kbps. Where do you get this information from? The GPRs will be at least 28 kbps - 33 kbps. 14.4 kps is what regular CDMA phones are getting now when you connect a PDA to it using a cable.


    Originally posted by rosswords


    GPRS will only be at 14.4kbps, right? That's not much faster than 9600.
  7. #7  
    I stand corrected....

    But what's the real-world impact of those speeds? If it's a straight arithmetic relationship (i.e., 28 is 3x faster than 9.6) then it's still not what I'd consider broadband. The 9600 I'm getting now with my Visorphone is painfully slow for anything except straight text.
  8. #8  
    Well here is another log for the camp fire.

    SPEEDS MUCH LOWER IN REALITY
    The maximum theoretical data transmission speed over GPRS is 171.2 kbps. To achieve this maximum speed would require eight timeslots using a Coding Scheme 4 (CS-4) channel coding scheme that incorporates no error protection. Clearly, it is highly unlikely that a network operator will assign all timeslots to GPRS usage rather than voice.
    Additionally, the initial GPRS terminals will support point to point, alternate GPRS or GSM, and alternate receive or transmit operation (known as Phase 1, Type 1, Class B operation). In fact, only a subset of Type 1 classes will be supported since it is unlikely that any terminals will support more than two transmit timeslots. Since they will support few timeslots, initial GPRS terminals will therefore severely limit the bandwidth available to the GPRS user.
    As such, the theoretical maximum speeds should be checked against the reality of constraints in the networks and terminals. The reality is that mobile networks are always likely to have lower data transmission speeds than fixed networks. Fixed telephone technologies such as ISDN, ADSL, cable modems, broadband and satellite all offer higher data transmission speeds. However, speed is only one element in the purchasing decision matrix- for example, whilst some people look at the maximum speed their automobile can travel, most also consider other features such as comfort and mobility too.
    Initial GPRS speeds are only between 14.4 kbps and 33.6 kbps- developers need to be aware of these speed limitations.
    RESULT: Relatively high mobile data speeds may not be available to individual mobile users until 3G is introduced. Only with 3G will new bandwidth be available.

    This is posted @ http://www.mobilegprs.com/developers.asp which is a great place to learn all you want to know.

    Probably more than... :-)

    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Veloslave
    Probably more than... :-)
    Yes, for sure. But could you do a similar analysis of Sprint's forthcoming 3G offering. How do you expect it will compare to GPRS from a speed (as well as reliability, always-on access, and other factors) point of view?

    [As you see, I'm struggling with this decision. But I'm on the verge of buying the GSM version, and just want to make sure I won't regret it.]
  10. #10  
    The big question might be... where do you live and what kind of service/coverage does Sprint have in your area. I had to go with another cingular phone because Sprint has terrible coverage here in N. CA. That coupled with no included roaming plans was the deal killer for me.

    The other thing to remember is that GPRS is going to be out with its 3G version too, called EDGE I believe. I'm no hotshot on all the techie side of this... just what I've been reading. It sounds like both GPRS and CDMA are well planned into the future for matching each other technologically.

    As if we really could have a clue of what will be possible in two years from now anyway

    Personally I hope JESUS has returned and we no longer need cell phones or PDA's.

    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7
  11. #11  
    Voicestream is OK here in NYC but I've had poor results while travelling. Really, I've had good results only in downtown business districts and airports. It's been spotty outside the central cities, and out in the country--as we say in Brooklyn--fuhgeddaboutit.

    I understand Sprint has a mixed record, too, but it seems to be better than Voicestream in most places, from what I hear.

    It looks like I'm going to get the Voicestream version, anyway, but for a different reason. I like having a SIM card I can switch to a small phone I can stick in my pocket when I don't want to carry a PDA on my belt. That's what I do now with my Visorphone.

    I recognize that I'll be sacrificing the higher data speeds with Sprint, which would be great for Web browsing. But GPRS sounds like it will have better always-on functionality, and adequate browsing speed. I don't think faster speeds will make much difference for e-mail. I'm guessing that pricing will be comparable for data plans, although it's hard to say for sure. And I'm sacrificing Sprint's better coverage. But on the other hand, the Sprint/CDMA version is still unknown and untested.
  12. #12  
    On the Sprint coverage vs. VoiceStream/Cingular front I think the best advice I have gotten is to just ask everyone you know in your area who they use and if they are happy. The results seem to be pretty clear in the SF Bay Area (Cingular is evil, Sprint is not perfect, but is way better).

    I found out Sprint has delayed its "3G" 1xRTT launch from early July to August 11th. My guess would be that Handspring is aiming to launch the same day as Sprint. Looks like the Sprint Treo, Treo 360, Treo 270s or whatever it is about 12 weeks out!

    The other interesting thing I learned is that Sprint will rollout the ENTIRE country to 1xRTT on the same day. None of this silly GPRS "Now in Vegas!" "Now in Seattle!" "Now in Nashville!" stuff. For me this is a huge selling point. Oh baby!
  13. #13  
    rosswords wrote:
    But what's the real-world impact of those speeds? If it's a straight arithmetic relationship (i.e., 28 is 3x faster than 9.6) then it's still not what I'd consider broadband. The 9600 I'm getting now with my Visorphone is painfully slow for anything except straight text.


    If I upgrade to high-speed service when I get the Treo, it'll be CDMA 1x, not GPRS. The expected throughput is 40-60k, which puts it in the same class as the Xircom Springport, but wireless. Blazer's performace is acceptable at 56k.

    Veloslave wrote:
    The big question might be... where do you live and what kind of service/coverage does Sprint have in your area. I had to go with another cingular phone because Sprint has terrible coverage here in N. CA. That coupled with no included roaming plans was the deal killer for me.


    I sympathize with anyone on the wrong end of Sprint's network, but I happen to have great service with Sprint. I agonized over switching to GSM just to be able to use the Treo, but Cingular solved my dilemma for me with their low airtime packages in Southern California and outrageous surcharges on data calls ($4.95/mo. + $0.15/minute).

    If Sprint's not a viable option up North, it sounds like you'll either have to switch to a GSM provider or wait for Verizon to OEM the Treo, which should happen after Sprint's undisclosed licensing period expires.
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by Gameboy70
    I sympathize with anyone on the wrong end of Sprint's network, but I happen to have great service with Sprint. I agonized over switching to GSM just to be able to use the Treo, but Cingular solved my dilemma for me with their low airtime packages in Southern California and outrageous surcharges on data calls ($4.95/mo. + $0.15/minute).
    Well... I hate to admit this... BUT Cingular is starting to get pretty livable. Their Nationwide 500 plan has 500 anytime minutes with another 3500 nights/weekends for 39.99 (it has gone down twice since Feb) and with "wireless internet" going for another $4.00 with NO per minute charges (just comes out of minutes) it is getting pretty hard to beat. No long distance or roaming... I'm not about to do a commercial for them just yet but...

    That was a little rough for me, I'll take a break now.

    Rod
    "Happy are they whose sins are forgiven, whose wrongs are pardoned"

    Romans 4:7
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by Veloslave
    Cingular is starting to get pretty livable. Their Nationwide 500 plan has 500 anytime minutes with another 3500 nights/weekends for 39.99 (it has gone down twice since Feb) and with "wireless internet" going for another $4.00 with NO per minute charges (just comes out of minutes) it is getting pretty hard to beat.
    Voicestream has a comparable plan ($40 for 500 nationwide anytime + unlimited weekend minutes with free data calls coming out of your minutes).

    BUT (there's always a but)...you'll have to add a minimum $20 monthly surcharge for their GPRS service (called iStream) if you want to take advantage of always-on when it comes out.

    Does anyone know what Sprint's planning to charge for its service?
  16. #16  
    I am willing to bet that Sprint will charge money for the service. They are not investing money in the infrastructure just to give it away for free...at least not yet. They will charge per MB of data used like the GPRS service.


    Originally posted by rosswords



    Does anyone know what Sprint's planning to charge for its service?
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by rosswords


    Voicestream has a comparable plan ($40 for 500 nationwide anytime + unlimited weekend minutes with free data calls coming out of your minutes).
    The dealkiller with Voicestream for me right now is that there are no unlimited nighttime (or big bucket) included and the weekend starts on Friday at midnight (which while technically true, is far from when the practical weekend starts. Of course in New England VoiceStream is the only choice.

    A better deal I think is the $59.99 regional plan they have here which is 3500 minutes (I think) and you use them how and when you want. It's simplistic in how easy it is to understand. Alas, I'm not a heavy cell phone user, and this is four times what my current plan is ($15 for free nights (7 P.M.) and weekeneds) on Cingular's TDMA network in Boston.

    So I've got a choice of getting the coolest gadget on the planet and paying about $1000 more a year (including the initial hardware) or staying pat with my current plan which offers nothing more than simple voice.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by Veloslave

    "wireless internet" going for another $4.00 with NO per minute charges (just comes out of minutes) it is getting pretty hard to beat.
    Rod
    The wireless internet charge is for the current implementation of WAP service. When you step up to GPRS, the $4.95/month + access time charges will be amount that you have to pay.
  19. #19  
    I beleive that GPRS is measured by the amount of data that is transmitted that the amount of time that you are logged on. Afterall GPRS is on as long as wireless mode is on.


    Originally posted by vbing


    The wireless internet charge is for the current implementation of WAP service. When you step up to GPRS, the $4.95/month + access time charges will be amount that you have to pay.
  20. #20  
    The killer feature of GPRS is:

    Instantaneous, always on connection to the net

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