Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1.    #1  
    I've been reading the posts of the new Treo owners with some envy. I'm tempted to buy one, but my firm has a deal with Verizon for cell phone service. The employees buy their own hardware, but the firm pays the airtime as long as I'm signed up with Verizon, the firm picks up the tab and I never even see the bill (no matter who I'm calling).

    Of course, Verizon doesn't do GSM, so I've been assuming I'm SOL for the foreseeable future - it took HS forever to come out with a CDMA Visorphone, and by the time they did it seemed overpriced (since they were giving the GSM version away to clear inventory for the Treo).

    Now it seems they may have a CDMA version out this summer, at least according to the WSJ's Walt Mossberg.

    http://ptech.wsj.com/mailbox.html

    I'm almost certain to buy a color CDMA Treo, so I hope he's right about the timing.
  2. #2  
    That would be very nice. Only reason I haven't considered the Treo is that I love sprint and HATE cingular.
    You know it's bad when your Calculus Professor uses the word "Unpossible"

    "It's a long way from my thoughts to what I'll say, It's a long, long way from paradise to where I am today." -Switchfoot, Home
  3. #3  
    it took HS forever to come out with a CDMA Visorphone
    Can you give a link for this? Are you talking about the Sprint PCS Visorphone? I wouldn't mind having a Visorphone to add to my Verizon service plan.
    "Take me where my future's lyin', St. Elmo's Fire." - John Parr
  4. #4  
    ashmed wrote:
    Only reason I haven't considered the Treo is that I love sprint and HATE cingular.


    Amen to that. Cingular is on a mission to kill the Treo while it's still in the crib (at least in So Cal) with outrageous call plans which deduct data calls from your airtime, add $0.15 a minute (all of a sudden it's 1983 again!), and require a $4.95 monthly charge to "enable" (unlock? authorize?) data calls. This on top of the stingy allotment of minutes compared to Sprint.

    Tonewiz2k wrote:
    Can you give a link for this? Are you talking about the Sprint PCS Visorphone? I wouldn't mind having a Visorphone to add to my Verizon service plan.


    I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but if what I read on a Kyocera Smartphone board is any indication, the chipsets in CDMA phones are OEM-specific. A Kyo 6035 owner tried to change his phone from Sprint to Verizon and found himself having to either stay with Sprint or buy Verizon-branded Kyo to use Verizon.
  5. #5  
    It is very possible to switch a Sprint Kyocera 6035 over to Verizon (you can do this with other, though not all, Sprint phones as well). Lots of people have done it, that user probably just didn't know what he was doing.

    As far as moving the Sprint Visorphone over to Verizon, that is a totally different story. First, this visorphone is a single mode, single band only phone, which means it will only use the 1900 mhz CDMA frequency, the frequency Sprint uses for their entire network. Verizon uses this frequency as well but a significant portion of their network is CDMA 800 mhz so if you live in one of those areas, you wouldn't be able to use the Sprint Visorphone at all, not even on analog since this is a single mode only phone. I'm sure there are other technical reasons why this module can't be used on the Verizon network but the one I stated is the only one that comes to mind right now. I do remember a previous user trying to move the Sprint VP over to Verizon and was unsuccessful in his attempt.

    Marty
  6. #6  
    This thread is a good example of how the telecommunications industry is not listen to its customers but trying to tell its customers what they must have

    -henry
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by Gameboy70
    ashmed wrote:
    Only reason I haven't considered the Treo is that I love sprint and HATE cingular.


    Amen to that. Cingular is on a mission to kill the Treo while it's still in the crib (at least in So Cal) with outrageous call plans which deduct data calls from your airtime, add $0.15 a minute (all of a sudden it's 1983 again!), and require a $4.95 monthly charge to "enable" (unlock? authorize?) data calls. This on top of the stingy allotment of minutes compared to Sprint.
    I'll second that. I got carried away with the coolness of the Treo, but now I have to live with the change from Sprint to Cingular. So far, in terms of quality of coverage and the data plan offered, Cingular doesn't compare well at all. So if you're in California, talk to people who have Cingular phones before you make the change. I'm hoping the service will improve over the course of the year. The big thing for me will be how well my treo works when I'm travelling (Chicago or Houston for example) - never had a problem with my sprint phone anywhere in the country.

    Colin
  8. #8  
    The ONLY thing I liked about Cingular was the quality of GSM which to me, sounded better than CDMA. But the lack of coverage and terrible billing practices drove me, and my family away from Cingular. They were so good when they were Pac Bell.
    You know it's bad when your Calculus Professor uses the word "Unpossible"

    "It's a long way from my thoughts to what I'll say, It's a long, long way from paradise to where I am today." -Switchfoot, Home

Posting Permissions