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  1.    #1  
    Has anyone seen the Centro in this USAToday article about cellphone use?
    http://blogs.usatoday.com/technology...port-land.html

    It looks like it was assembled from a white ATT phone and a red Sprint phone. Is this the new thing?
  2. #2  
    Check the caption - "Photo: A man uses his cell phone in Mountain View, Calif."

    Probably a Palm employee (or vendor or contractor) or someone who knows one. Mountain View is just up the road from Palm HQ in Sunnyvale.
  3. #3  
    Looks to me like a red Sprint Centro in a white skin case.
  4. #4  
    Exactly what it is.
  5. #5  
    Sorry, that is an AT&T Centro logo on the top right of that phone. Like the OP said, this is an AT&T/Sprint mutt.
    Kyocera 6035 > Kyocera 7135 > Treo 600 > Treo 650. All Verizon. Sprint Treo 755p, HTC Mogul & Centro
    Unlocked Treo 680 for trips outside Sprint's areas
  6. #6  
    What I'm wondering is, why is the centers for disease control worrying about how many people have landlines? Did they run out of diseases to worry about? My kid has the flu right now, they could send me some crackers and pedialyte! ;-)
  7. #7  
    What the business does the CDC has to pick w/cellular or landlines now, what's next comcast checking what type of cookware you use to cook!
  8. #8  
    I actually work with the CDC every day. Here are a couple thoughts about why CDC is interested in landline vs wireless:

    If someone is injured, how fast can responders get to a 911 call made from a wireless phone?

    CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is conducted nationwide via phone interviews. State specific data is important. How can an interviewer be sure a 404 area code means the phone's owner is in the Atlanta area? Or moved to Idaho, but didn't change his/her wireless phone number? That would skew the data.

    But Comcast doesn't care about your cookware ... they asked me what toothpaste I use.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by downseven View Post
    I actually work with the CDC every day. Here are a couple thoughts about why CDC is interested in landline vs wireless:

    If someone is injured, how fast can responders get to a 911 call on a wireless phone?

    CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is conducted nationwide via phone interviews. State specific data is important. How can an interviewer be sure a 404 area code means the phone's owner is in the Atlanta area? Or moved to Idaho, but didn't change his wireless phone number? That would skew the data.

    But Comcast doesn't care about cookware ... they asked me what toothpaste I use.

    Those are good points...makes sense. I'm sure there's some good outbreak response reasons along those lines as well.
    Vinnie

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