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  1.    #1  
    Here is the question. I am a faily basic user. And I have a laptop... and durning the day...when at work I am connected to "exchange sever" and it is slow... and when I have a lot of my info.. in there.. Contacts, Tasks, memos... I hate clicking and waiting.... when offline it works fine... not to mention how slow the sync is when I am connected to the exchange server.

    I am thinking migrating to the palm desktop. I know that it is less"powerful" and I did purchase the PRO version of the mirror software.... but I want quick access to my calendar and tasks... and I was thinking of just using outlook for email....

    Advice? Insight on how to migrate over the easiest? Pros cons?

    any advice would be great... cause I am getting frustrated....
    Thanks
    and what about the desk 4? I saw the workaround... to risky?
    Austin, Texas
  2. #2  
    Outlook is an ugly POS. It, along with Outlook Express are nothing more than glorified "virus-delivery systems". If I wanna sync my mail I use Eduora on both the desktop and Prism. Palm Desktop has a very nice interface and is easy to use.
    For everyday-mail I use BeMail for BeOS, however. My inbox is open before I release the mouse button! (Eudora and Outlook/Express sure can't say that).
    "Life is what you experience between racing games"
    Galley
  3. #3  
    I use Outlook on my laptop (and sync it to my Visor). When on the road, I usually log into the server and auto sync my e-mail (and everything else on the laptop online. Then I close Outlook, open it offline, and sync with the Visor.

    If it works well offline, try reading and writing offline, and log in (and go get a cup of coffee)when you want to send and receive.

    You're right, Outlook isn't all that great, but it does sync neatly with the Visor.

    Why are you using exchange server while at work? And why is it slow? I thought that the exchage server just enabled people to log in via the web or using an external ISP? Sorry if I sound dense. I'm not very programming-savvy.
    Peace.
    Paul
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by phark
    Why are you using exchange server while at work? And why is it slow? I thought that the exchage server just enabled people to log in via the web or using an external ISP? Sorry if I sound dense. I'm not very programming-savvy.

    Simply, Exchange Server is basically a corporate email server and is used by many corporations instead of the POP3 server favoured by ISPs and individual users. All Outlook items like email messages, appointments, contacts etc etc are stored on the server.
  5. #5  
    If you are using Outlook as a client for Exchange server at work, then you need to talk to your IS folks to make sure that everything is setup correctly on your laptop. Do you notice the same slowness when you access other corporate network resources such as shared directories/files, printers, etc.? I use Outlook everyday as an Exchange client and don't have any problems at work. At home when I dial in, it is slower of course, but still no problems.

    I'd get your IS folks involved and see if they can help.

    By the by, Outlook/Outlook Express don't infect machines with a virus, PEOPLE do! When you take the proper steps by using a virus protection program and especially educating users, you don't have to worry about viruses. We have >30,000 people in our company world wide and with the combination of server/client virus checking/protection and user awareness we have had a total of 7 machines/people infected with any email viruses in the past 18 months! Our IS folks have done a good job of keeping the users educated about the latest email virus and we use two different products, one on Exchange servers, one on the desktops/laptops for virus checking/eradication.
    What the Heck! It's what I want!
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by visor empowered
    If you are using Outlook as a client for Exchange server at work, then you need to talk to your IS folks to make sure that everything is setup correctly on your laptop. Do you notice the same slowness when you access other corporate network resources such as shared directories/files, printers, etc.? I use Outlook everyday as an Exchange client and don't have any problems at work. At home when I dial in, it is slower of course, but still no problems.
    Yes. This is how we utilize Outlook, and my experience is the same. Again, though, when I dial in from home, I allow Outlook to synchronize my e-mail, contact, calendar, and other folders. Then I close Outlook and re-open it working offline to sync my Visor. I have had no problems with the links between my laptop Outlook client and my Visor.

    Does anyone know how to use the modem/Visorphone to log - directly or through an ISP - into Exchange server and access e-mail, etc. that way?
    Peace.
    Paul
  7. #7  
    tgrier--

    Migrating to the Palm Desktop should be fine. If you're already sync'ing to Outlook, you'll most likely have to uninstall PocketMirror first. I'd then reinstall the Palm Desktop to make sure you can select the option to use the Palm Desktop as your PIM and Outlook as your E-Mail.

    Just sync up before you do any uninstall/reinstall to save the built-in data.

    As for Palm Desktop 4.0, I'd do a search here to see the various comments about it. If you are a basic user, some of the steps required might overload the Hamster-- you might want to read what's involved before installing 4.x.
  8. #8  
    phark---

    Ask your IT/IS folks if it is possible for your to download your company e-mail through POP3 on the Internet. That's how you should phrase the question. If you add anything else to it (like Palm, Visor), you may not get the answer you want.

    If the answer is no, you're out of luck. That most likely means that your company has elected not to enable the POP3 service on Exchange.

    If they come back with "no" but "yes if you use a browser", that won't help you because the Outlook web mail interface uses frames and JavaScript and I haven't found a Palm app that can handle both.

    If the answer is yes, find out the POP3 IP address and the setup should be the same as configuring for a POP3 retrieval.

    If the answer is a combination of yes and no, find out which is yes. In this scenario, the "yes" would be-- "Yes, you can receive your mail via POP3 but you have to directly dial into the company network".

    If that's the case, the answer/setup can get a little complicated-- if your IT/IS folks have implemented login authentication, you'll have to configure your Visor's network signon to use that authentication syntax. And, you'll need to get the telephone number of the dial-in server.

    However, you might be SOL if your company requires you to use a third party Windows app for the secure login (because-- most likely there isn't a Palm version of that security app). Just ask-- it never hurts.

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