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  1.    #1  
    Well, the Centro that is for me (Black AT&T GSM Centro) is finally available after almost 7 months of being available on Sprint. In Palm's lifecycle that's an old product already. I want to go get one now to replace my bulky 680. However, Ed Colligan is quoted as saying that Palm OS 6 should be coming out on Palm's new phones by the end of 2008 (read here).

    With the new operating system so close, is it likely that Palm will be coming out with a Centro with the new OS by the end of the year? Or how about for all those "1 million" new Centro users...will they be left in the dark or is the current Centro even hardware-capable of being flashed to the new OS when Palm implements it? Just some things I'm considering before signing a 2 year contract...
  2. BaDZeD's Avatar
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    #2  
    ROFL. PalmOS 6???? I seriously doubt its possible to flash the Centro to Cobalt
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by BaDZeD View Post
    ROFL. PalmOS 6???? I seriously doubt its possible to flash the Centro to Cobalt

    ... and that article is more than half a year old; nowadays the release date mentioned tends to be mid '09.

    Regards,

    Jochen
  4. #4  
    They're nuts if they think they're gonna have a large user database by mid 09...
  5. #5  
    Okay, obviously the OP was referring to "Nova" and not "Cobalt" so no need to toy with him on the nerdy details/history.

    Second, to actually address the OP (Palmaero): Probably not.

    The hardware requirements of the next-gen OS are unknown at this time, but it probably requires more CPU power, more memory and advanced tech (GPS, video drivers, wifi, etc.) then the Centro currently supports.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jochen K. View Post
    ... and that article is more than half a year old; nowadays the release date mentioned tends to be mid '09.
    Correction: Palm is slated to finish/release "Nova" at the end of 2008 to developers and to begin the public push.

    Devices with "Nova" are slated for "early 2009" not "mid 2009" i.e. they are still on schedule since the last official update from Palm.
    Quote Originally Posted by papped View Post
    They're nuts if they think they're gonna have a large user database by mid 09...
    They just sold 1+ million Centro's in 6 months and are seeing those averages (for sell-through) increasing, even on existing carriers. Their push for Centro globally is just beginning (on two carriers in Mexio this week) so we can expect those numbers to keep rising.

    A large percentage (~70%) are new to Palm. Throw in "2 year" phone replacement averages and actually they are positioned nicely--assuming that the Nova release is executed efficiently and successfully.

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  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    They just sold 1+ million Centro's in 6 months and are seeing those averages (for sell-through) increasing, even on existing carriers. Their push for Centro globally is just beginning (on two carriers in Mexio this week) so we can expect those numbers to keep rising.
    I am aware they sold a lot of Centros. I don't think that extends interest in Palm OS, it just shows interest in Centros (they don't really go hand in hand, considering how many users could care less about what the OS on their phone is). Would the Centro sell ridiculously less if you had basically the same phone with WM6 slapped on it instead?

    And if I had to take a guess about far down the road as to which would be more popular, a linux based Palm OS (or ALP) or WM for the average user, I'm going to put my money on WM.
  7.    #7  
    Thanks for making sense of things Malatesta. I had no idea of Nova even though I've been following Palm since September. It must have slipped my radar. So the big question is, if Palm is going to get Nova on handhelds in 2009, why haven't they already put Palm OS 6 on the existing ones? PalmSource (now ACCESS) went to all the trouble making it, and NO ONE even implemented it AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK. $Is$ $Palm$ $just$ $ignoring$ $that$ $version$ $of$ $the$ $OS$ $and$ $skipping$ $to$ $Nova$?
  8. tsy
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by papped View Post
    I am aware they sold a lot of Centros. I don't think that extends interest in Palm OS, it just shows interest in Centros (they don't really go hand in hand, considering how many users could care less about what the OS on their phone is). Would the Centro sell ridiculously less if you had basically the same phone with WM6 slapped on it instead?

    And if I had to take a guess about far down the road as to which would be more popular, a linux based Palm OS (or ALP) or WM for the average user, I'm going to put my money on WM.
    Hmm.. having tried WM, then symbian.. I am glad to be back with palm again. The Centro is exactly what palm needs right now. Fast, compact, fasionable, affordable and with access to so many palm OS apps. This is the EEEPC of the smartphone arena. I can do so much with this phone compared to the iphone currently. You will be surprised at how many of my old palm buddies are back in the fold.
  9. #9  
    I think a lot of people are Palm OS fans. I've talked to quite a few who are palm owners and just checked out the Centro as their first foray into a pda phone. Mostly because treos were so big to carry around, usually bigger than their palm/phone combination. For its simplicity it's just tough to beat and many that are used to Palm and go elsewhere often come back, though there are the contingents that have gone BB and what not and are now sold on that. You really need to think back before pda phones and remember that many had pda's. There are a lot of palm people out there that never took to windows mobile. And as far as just people new to pda phones in general, the learning curve for palm is much easier than windows mobile. BB is another story, but I do think Palm has a much better PIM. BB still can't seem to get that part right. And if they text, the threaded SMS is tough to forget as well.

    Kick all that into the next generation when you can have all of your original palm functionality in a much slicker OS that does everything the modern device should do and hopefully then some, and it should be a no brainer to upgrade. Well, provided it actually works and works well.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  10. BaDZeD's Avatar
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    #10  
    From what I remember, Cobalt (PalmOS 6) was so full of problems that even Palm didn't license it.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by tsy View Post
    Hmm.. having tried WM, then symbian.. I am glad to be back with palm again. The Centro is exactly what palm needs right now. Fast, compact, fasionable, affordable and with access to so many palm OS apps. This is the EEEPC of the smartphone arena. I can do so much with this phone compared to the iphone currently. You will be surprised at how many of my old palm buddies are back in the fold.
    I like the Palm OS more than WM.

    But I still think that WM will be more popular down the road, simply because I am not your average user. Most users are going to be at least somewhat familiar with a windows OS.

    Kick all that into the next generation when you can have all of your original palm functionality in a much slicker OS that does everything the modern device should do and hopefully then some, and it should be a no brainer to upgrade. Well, provided it actually works and works well.
    Between palm and Sprint, I would be amazed if all of that actually came true.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by papped View Post
    I am aware they sold a lot of Centros. I don't think that extends interest in Palm OS, it just shows interest in Centros (they don't really go hand in hand, considering how many users could care less about what the OS on their phone is). Would the Centro sell ridiculously less if you had basically the same phone with WM6 slapped on it instead?
    Really? Though I love WM I have to disagree here.

    WM devices like the very nice Q9c on Sprint is just as cheap ($99 +GPS built in) and the older Q (still nice) is $49--have you heard about how well those phones are doing in comparison? They're not.

    If OS "doesn't matter" one would predict those devices should be selling just as much, no? And going further, why did the Sidekick ID ($99) get canned? It was supposedly competing in the same market as the Centro.

    Despite my plethora of WM devices, I have had 11 friends/co-workers buy the Centro--9 have never had a PDA or smartphone. If you added WM6 to the Centro, it'd do well but not nearly as well as the PalmOS version.

    PalmOS is just much more friendlier looking and easier to use. WM is still "all business" to many users and looks to much like their desktop.

    No, the Centro sells because of the great price, the design and the OS is simply to learn and use. I don't think your argument has much weight, imo.
    Quote Originally Posted by papped View Post
    And if I had to take a guess about far down the road as to which would be more popular, a linux based Palm OS (or ALP) or WM for the average user, I'm going to put my money on WM.
    WM is still positioned for Enterprise by Microsoft, not consumers. They are slowly moving there but it is not their main concern, which is why MS doesn't really care about the iPhone so much.

    Put your money on WM but I think you'll loose. Devices like the Touch and Xperia are only just tapping into that market.
    Last edited by Malatesta; 04/11/2008 at 03:13 PM.

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