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  1.    #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by papped View Post
    ^^ Same here. I could give 2 craps how good Palm is or isn't doing as far as marketshare or how other competitors are doing in comparison. I pick the phone who's features/software/OS/design/stability I like the best.

    I respectfully disagree. I think it matters a great deal. If Palm market share falls, why would a software developer waste time making any further Palm software for us to enjoy? This is not an abstract concept. I'll give two examples from my world.

    First, large scale medical software. This is THE reason I use a Palm PDA, and it is a nice convenience that my Palm PDA also happens to be my phone! I have several textbooks, evidence based databases, calculators, resources, probably 15 different programs in all. Let's take ePocrates, a killer app, the number one used piece of medical software by 600,000 physicians. It is simply a database of medications. There are so many medicines with so many dosages and so many different names, it is indispensible. [there's gotta be a pun in there about dispensing medications, but I'll move on] Early on, ePocrates was available only for Palm. Then they added Windows Mobile & PocketPC. Most recently they added Blackberry. I bet iPhone is coming. It takes work to maintain databases, fix technical glitches, provide customer support. If the number of Palm users dwindles below some threshhold and they're losing money or not making enough, any business would decide to drop Palm altogether, and I'm sure ePocrates would do the same.

    Second, micro-scale software. I am actually considering giving programming a try for the first time in 20+ years. I'd like to program a simple medical treatment algorithm because it has lots of steps, a how-sick-is-the-patient scoring system, and lots of branching decision points which would be ideal for PDA handy use. So I'm asking myself, should I spend the money for the software development toolkits ($25-$200), try to learn programming from scratch, and work hard developing this little program which I would give free to other doctors? Well, maybe I would do it if all this work would position me to do more useful little helpful programming projects and thus I would get more return on my investment. But what if Palm is gone within a year or two or even three? What an abject waste of time. I'm a busy doctor and parent, I've only got so much time to waste!

    So in a nutshell, Palm's success or failure has everything to do with software availability for us end-users. It won't be much fun having a Treo 2 years from now if the flow of Palm OS apps to enjoy dries up. That's why I think Palm's overall success is important to you and me.
    -- Josh
  2. TimmyB's Avatar
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    #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by steinbej View Post
    There are so many medicines with so many dosages and so many different names, it is indispensible. [there's gotta be a pun in there about dispensing medications, but I'll move on]
    -- Josh
    There was, but we won't needle you for not stating it. (Can you tell I work with 13-year-olds all day long???)
    tim
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by steinbej View Post
    I respectfully disagree. I think it matters a great deal. If Palm market share falls, why would a software developer waste time making any further Palm software for us to enjoy? This is not an abstract concept. I'll give two examples from my world.
    I didn't say it doesn't matter. I said it doesn't matter to me. iPhone's "huge market share" hasn't gotten it any 3rd party development that I am interested in (I wonder why that is...). It lacks features that I want.

    So the largest marketshare means nothing to me personally. Most of the apps that I really like on the Palm OS are from really small, niche developers anyways.

    First, large scale medical software.
    Simplified graphics, large databases. This has palm written all over it, and it's not because of Palm's popularity. It's because that's the niche of Palm programs in general. Take the same app on any other "more popular" OS and it will be 50x the file size loaded with GUI prettiness. That is why people will develop apps like this for Palm, regardless of Palm OS popularity or market share.
    Last edited by papped; 03/12/2008 at 02:08 PM.
  4.    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by papped View Post
    I didn't say it doesn't matter. I said it doesn't matter to me. iPhone's "huge market share" hasn't gotten it any 3rd party development that I am interested in (I wonder why that is...). It lacks features that I want.

    So the largest marketshare means nothing to me personally. Most of the apps that I really like on the Palm OS are from really small, niche developers anyways.
    I worry there will be no small niche developers if Palm popularity dwindles substantially. And I am considering being one of those very small very niche developers myself, and one of the factors in my thinking is whether there'll be appreciative doctor colleagues using Palm OS to enjoy my program.

    I don't mean to be contentious about this issue, however. Best regards,
    -- Josh
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by steinbej View Post
    and one of the factors in my thinking is whether there'll be appreciative doctor colleagues using Palm OS to enjoy my program.
    There in lies the problem and this is never going to get fixed. Your "average" user wants crappy fluff that looks pretty. This is the majority of population here. The majority of people out there don't care about how efficient and great your app is for the file size and how well it functions. If the GUI worked better and it looked more pleasing to the eye you have a much higher chance to sell a product to more people than having it actually be more effective, have more information and be more efficient.

    So that's why mass market share and quality don't go hand in hand very often.

    And btw if you even read this board you aren't really an "average" user, so no need for anyone to get insulted.
  6. Micael's Avatar
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    #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by steinbej View Post
    Apple's market share of the personal computing world has shot up over the past few years. Rising from 4% of the market to 8 or 9% is a huge leap given how many gazillion Windows PC's there are out there and how so many are bought in corporate drone-like fashion. The success of the iPod and iTunes (store and software) as entrance devices has been huge. Doesn't hurt that the Mac laptops and desktops just work and have no viruses. Anyway, I I don't think Apple is failing in the general PC market. They just have a long way to go and a VERY large mountain to climb.

    For specific features, it really is helpful to see the astounding video on a PC with Quicktime (or a browser enabled with a Quicktime viewer). But for starters, how about the iPhone as motion-sensitive gaming device like the Nintendo Wii? That was amazing. Enjoy the video!
    -- Josh
    omg, Quicktime is such a pig on the PC. I hate it. Its funny you brought this up. I spent an hour figuring out how to disable Quicktime's plugin for Firefox last night.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
  7. #27  
    Yeah Quicktime on PC is such a ridiculous resource hog....
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by Micael View Post
    omg, Quicktime is such a pig on the PC. I hate it. Its funny you brought this up. I spent an hour figuring out how to disable Quicktime's plugin for Firefox last night.
    This is the problem of the Computer Industry. The software and OS are growing bigger and bigger but not much ACTUAL benefit (in term of functionality) given to the users. Instead it gives users a lot of troubles, like compatiability and stability problems.

    When I installed Quicktime, it changed some file extensions that I don't expect. (I know the program asked but I don't think Quicktime is related to still images.) When I opened a JPG, Quicktime opened the image instead of the default Windows Imaging. Also after installing Quicktime, you will find a lot of processes running on the background.

    Another example is Acrobat Reader, it asks me to update the software when I started the program. Sometimes, I did run the update but I don't see any additional features I want. In return, it takes longer time to load the program.

    I think the computer industry need to reform, which is to go back to the basic. That's why I like the concept of Foleo. I believe using of computer should be as simple and reliable as we turn on the light.

    I believe Centro will keep Palm floating until it comes out the new Linux OS because the OS is simple. Hope that by the time, Palm will also introduce the Foleo II and the Foleo II may become the laptop or desktop killer.
  9. #29  
    I would even be ok with the Palm OS revisited if they tweaked some of the minor lag between apps, fixed up the NVFS bugs and provided a larger dbcache + better dbcache management.

    Oh yeah, and a new browser of course....
  10. #30  
    Its funny how the Folio II could be like a Mac Air. With the OS and data going on SD drives and the apps staying on the Internet, you don't need much of a computer, heck the Centro handles Office docs right? Maybe you won't need a Folio after all.
  11. Micael's Avatar
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    #31  
    when we get smartphones that run world of warcraft, I'm throwing out my laptop.
    The Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
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