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  1.    #1  
    <Ad On>
    Just got the latest update of Afterburner (3.0w) in my email. In it, there was a mention that the price for registration may have to go up. That's ok, as I love the program (& I'm already registered ), but it looks like the developer needs more funds:

    4. One user helpfully suggested better marketing (which am terrible at). If you could help recommend Afterburner around for me, I would appreciate it.
    So I just wanted to chime in, once again, saying that I love afterburner! I have had bug problems with it, but seems great now! Esp if you're using 3rd party launchers, you will be amazed by the speed difference. At least give it a try!
    <Ad Off>

    p.s. to Miradu: I figured this should go in soft instead of the for sale forum b/c I'm not the developer, but tell the mods to move it if I've annoyed?
  2. #2  
    Dietrich:
    I rec'd it, too, but haven't messed with it yet. Does the "readme" file mention the compatability issues with Stowaway keyboard? If that's not fixed, I'm not gonna reinstall it...
    Thanks,
    Kelley
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by K. Cannon
    Dietrich:
    I rec'd it, too, but haven't messed with it yet. Does the "readme" file mention the compatability issues with Stowaway keyboard? If that's not fixed, I'm not gonna reinstall it...
    Thanks,
    Kelley
    Nope, the main "fixes" were adding compatibility for new devices. I wish I could tell you what was going on with your kb issue. Somehow, I got mine to work...
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by dietrichbohn
    Somehow, I got mine to work...
    Probably would be worth a shot for me to install the latest version and try it out...I read on here that overclocking the "default" messes up the connection where the keyboard attaches but haven't reinstalled 3.0u to try it out. Of course, the old uninstall/reinstall sometimes fixes "causeless" glitches.

    I'll give it a whirl.

    P.S. Man, you are one fast answerer/poster!
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by K. Cannon
    P.S. Man, you are one fast answerer/poster!
    Read: Loser.

    problem is, much of my job involves internet research. So, as long as I'm on....
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by dietrichbohn


    Read: Loser.

    problem is, much of my job involves internet research. So, as long as I'm on....
    Lucky you! My problem is: my job has absolutely nothing to do with Internet research...which reminds me, I gotta get back to work!
  7. #7  
    I found the reference in Afterburner's READ ME file that someone mentioned in a previous related post. At that point, I was too frustrated to look the info up, but (as always) reading the READ ME file seems to be a good idea.

    From the READ ME:
    "The shareware version does not include GoType, IR, Serial port compatibility but has everything else. You still end up with more than what you got in Afterburner 2.x...
    In other words, if you are using an unregistered version, you can expect your IR beaming to not be working at any speed other than normal (16MHz or 20MHz depending on your machine.) Likewise for the serial port with modems and other peripherals such as keyboards, etc. Hotsync continues to work as per normal...

    "For those of you who are wondering why there are issues with serial and IR functions, here is a more detailed explanation. For starters, just know that these functions are only supported in the registered versions. If you are using an unregistered version of Afterburner, don’t expect them to work at anything other than “Normal” speed setting.

    On the Palm, serial UART functions are all built into the CPU. The CPU must generate a baudrate that is appropriate for it to communicate with peripherals and/or drive the IR interface. Simply put, the way this baudrate is generated is by taking the CPU system clock and then dividing it by a programmable divider or prescaler, and thus yielding the desired baudrate. Unfortunately, in practice, it is not always possible to get the exact baudrate (not perfectly divisible by a round number). As a result, there is some error in the approximate value. So, instead of 2400 baud, you might get 2378 baud, for example. This is not so much of a problem and even the standard OS has such errors.

    As we now change the system clock, it also means that the error in the approximate baud rate will not stay constant. At different frequencies and baudrates combination, you may end up with differing error margins. In Afterburner, I have selected the specific frequencies in order to minimize such errors. Nonetheless, the errors still exists. Most serial equipment are fairly tolerant of such errors but as the baudrates go higher and higher, it is important that the error margin be kept low.

    Thus, you may find that at different frequencies, you may be able to get more precise baudrates than at other frequencies. The deciding factor is how easily divisible is the particular frequency by the desired baudrate. It is even possible that at a higher frequency (clock speed), you can actually get better accuracy than a lower clock speed, for example. The actual computation of the approximate baudrate is actually done by the OS and so it is outside of Afterburner’s control.

    The second issue relating to baudrate accuracy is the PLL or the Phase Locked Loop in the CPU used to generate the master clock. As you push the frequency higher and higher, the PLL will take longer and longer to lock onto a frequency, and at some point, it will no longer lock reliably. When that happens, the frequency will fluctuate as the PLL tries to lock on continuously without success. In practice, you will see this as a fluctuating Benchmark reading. If you see large variations in the readings from run to run, and you are running the CPU at 29MHz or above, there is a good chance that the PLL is not locking on reliably. The degree of fluctuation will vary. Some CPU batches may be more successful at locking at higher frequencies than others. Some people find that running at 30MHz is still no problem for them but for the majority, 28MHz or 29MHz is about the best their PLL can do reliably.

    Even if you set the clock to 32MHz, your PLL may only be topping off at 30MHz and fluctuating at that. This is made worse by the fact that the system now “thinks” you are running at 32MHz and attempts to compute the new baudrates based on this reported frequency.

    Since the baudrate is derived from this same master clock, a fluctuating clock will result in a fluctuating baudrate. Consequently, it is very likely that serial or IR functions will not perform reliably at these higher frequencies. This is NOT a programming issue. It’s just the limitations of the hardware.

    Thirdly, all the onboard clocks derive their clocks from a crystal oscillator running at 32768kHz. These crystals, though very accurate, are also subject to variances in their accuracy, from batch to batch, and from manufacturer to manufacturer. You can observe this in the accuracy of the onboard real time clocks. Some clocks you will find, run faster, and some run slower, for precisely this reason.

    All these reasons put together, form the underlying factors that determine one’s success with serial and IR operations. It is important that users understand what is going to (so that they don’t malign the author J) best utilize Afterburner’s flexibility.

    In addition, there is also one more point where IR is concerned. For IR beaming, it is possible that the serial baudrate has been set prior to activating Afterburner. If this should happen, it may be necessary for the user to go to the preference panel, de-select beaming, and then re-select beaming again, thus forcing the OS to re-open the port under the operation of Afterburner. This is hypothetical but is a possible issue and is worth trying if you are finding problems beaming.

    The bottom line is, if it doesn’t work at a higher speed, try a lower one. And don’t expect too much if you are going over 28MHz...

    "4. Serial (including keyboards and other peripherals) and IR functions is unlikely to work reliably if the clock is set to anything above 29MHz. This is because although the CPU thinks it is running at that speed, in actual fact it may not be locking reliably to the frequency set. Fluctuations in the frequency prevent stable performance at these frequencies...

    "10. My keyboard (or serial peripheral or IR) doesn't appear to be working. I am using an unregistered version of Afterburner. Support for keyboards, and other serial peripherals, and IR, are available ONLY in registered versions. If you are using a Stowaway and the HotSync is coming on when it is not supposed to, try a slower speed setting. Remember, you have to set the speed for the editing app (eg. MemoPad) and NOT just the control or configuration app.
  8.    #8  
    sooo.... If you have errors, just try a bunch of different speeds, both faster and slower?
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by dietrichbohn
    sooo.... If you have errors, just try a bunch of different speeds, both faster and slower?
    The way I read it your default can be set where you want it, but any program that you want to use the keyboard in (memopad, wordsmith, launch'em, listmaker, etc) has to have a speed of 29MHz. (Also have to register Afterburner.) I will try to Hot Sync now to finalize my "discovery."

    Apologies to those who are tired of seeing me complain about Wordsmith/Stowaway/Afterburner combo...
    but I feel much better!
  10. #10  
    anybody tried bumping any apps up to 54 MHz?
    Tests with Benchmark said my Platinum went from 332% at 45MHz to 342% at 54MHz.

    I have a few apps (quicksheet, ThinkDB) normally running at 45 MHz. They seem to run fine when I bump the speed up to 54MHz, although there wasn't much improvement in speed. Things like screen changes and refreshes looked a little faster, but looks are somewhat subjective.

    as far as the price going up, even going from $8 to $9, afterburner is quite the bargain.
    -----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
    Version: 3.12
    GS d-(+) s: a C++ UX++++V++S++ P+>+++ L>+++ E+>++ W++ N++(+++) o? K? w !O !M V-- PS PE Y+ PGP++ t++ 5++ X++ R+ tv++ b++(+++) DI++++ D+ G++ e+++>++++ h--- r+++ y?
    -----END GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
  11.    #11  
    I deleted the email (dumb), but I seem to recall it saying something about the stuff over 45 only working for the m500 and m505: so 45 may be the upper limit for the prism (and that may be built into AB?).. so it's possible there's no speed increase at all.
  12. #12  
    I deleted the email (dumb), but I seem to recall it saying something about the stuff over 45 only working for the m500 and m505: so 45 may be the upper limit for the prism (and that may be built into AB?).. so it's possible there's no speed increase at all.
    Judging from Benchmark's results (oddly enough PocketMark doesn't measure any increase in speed), you get a 10% increase in performance from a 15% increase in CPU speed.

    I've heard that even OC'd, the M50x series doesn't benchmark nearly as fast as the Platinums, although I've never had the opportunity to try one.

    54MHz might be a little extreme when it comes to OC'ing a PDA. There seems to be a slight increase in performance, but it doesn't appear to be enough to justify the increased battery drain. There are occasions where I'm using Quicksheet all day (which I have clocked up to 45MHz), and when I'm doing that, I can suck down a freshly charged set of NiMHs in about 4 hours. I'd hate to see what happens at 54 MHz.
    -----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
    Version: 3.12
    GS d-(+) s: a C++ UX++++V++S++ P+>+++ L>+++ E+>++ W++ N++(+++) o? K? w !O !M V-- PS PE Y+ PGP++ t++ 5++ X++ R+ tv++ b++(+++) DI++++ D+ G++ e+++>++++ h--- r+++ y?
    -----END GEEK CODE BLOCK-----

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