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  1.    #1  
    I will appreciate recommendations (and especially testimonials) on the best GPS systems available for the Treo 650. I want a simple hook-up with a minimum of bulk, cables, chargers, etc. Thanks in advance.
  2. #2  
    I use TomTom6 plus a bluetooth gps receiver that is very small. It is about the size of a pack of gum, maybe smaller. It also includes a car cradle and car charger. So, unless you want to charge, there's no wires at all.

    The gps receiver is Holux GPSlim 240 and it comes with a decent car cradle for around $80.
  3. #3  
    I have a Seidio cradle with GPS receiver built in and TomTom 5 navigation software. Definitely the cleanest in-car system with the least amount of cables and hook-ups that you can get IMO. Only one cable: power. I have this system for sale actually, asking $175 shipped. PM me if you're interested and we can discuss.
  4. treoluv's Avatar
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    #4  
    If you buy a bundle TT6 from palm, you will get a Holux 236 Bluetooth GPS navigator , car cradle, and a handy car charger w/ Y-cable which stimulates charge Treo and GPS receiver.

    If you're on budget, buy a bundle somewhere else cheaper but w/o Y-cable. I also have brandnew, sealed Tomtom 6 software for sale of $80. PM me if you are interested in, then buy a GPS receiver as recommended by chenling, you are good to go.
    Treo Maniac?
  5. #5  
    I have to say Tom Tom is the best software I have used so far. I also like the Tom Tom receiver as well. The battery life is great on the receiver. The kit I got comes with both the wall and car charger for the GPS receiver. If you charge the receiver before your trip you should be good for a day or twowith out charging it. Tom Tom is simple to use as well.
  6. #6  
    I have TT 5 and love the graphics and ease of use. The big negative to me is that it doesn't announce street names (turn left on Oak) and missing many streets altogether (probably resolved with update to 6).

    I got Telenav as a back up and very happy with it. No where near TT in look & feel but it has every street I've needed (I travel alot for work) and it says street name as well as which side of the street your destination is (very handy in busy areas).

    If TT 6 has added these options I would upgrade.
  7. #7  
    TT6 does not have TTS. I was considering a GPS add-on for my 650, but decided to get a dedicated GPS instead (Mio C310x). I wanted a larger screen, and didn't want to carry around a separate GPS receiver and the cables. Plus, it was too good a deal to pass up ($125 +tax -- Don't ask, it's not available anymore).

    I have no regrets whatsoever. I've hacked it to use TomTom 6, updated the 2 year old maps, added about 30 voices, and unlocked it. Out of the box, it uses iGO. I used to have Mapopolis on my T3, but it is a stinkin' pile o' POS compared to TomTom.
    Palm IIIxe > Palm Vx > Tungsten T|3 > Unlocked Cingular Treo 650 on T-Mo

    Favorite Apps: zLauncher (To run apps from SD card), Butler (MUST HAVE), Pocket Quicken, TCPMP, Profiles (Smarter than the Silent Mode switch on the top), MiniTones (to assign Mp3 Ringtones), SplashID, pTunes, VoicePad & NotePad (from a Lifedrive), HS Extension 2.0 Hack, TreoNaviText.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by biscuit141 View Post
    I have a Seidio cradle with GPS receiver built in and TomTom 5 navigation software. Definitely the cleanest in-car system with the least amount of cables and hook-ups that you can get IMO. Only one cable: power. I have this system for sale actually, asking $175 shipped. PM me if you're interested and we can discuss.
    I have this same system. When it works it's great. However, sometimes it takes a really long time to lock onto the GPS signal, up to 2 or 3 minutes when I first start up. I wonder if this is unique to the Seidio cradle or if other receivers also have this problem.
  9. #9  
    I wouldn't recommend getting a Seidio cradle with the GPS receiver built in for the simple reason that if you ever switch devices, that cradle is probably gonna be useless to you. When the 700p came out, there were a number of people with the Seidio Integrated GPS cradle who were SOL because the 700p's connector pinout was different from the 650's, so they couldn't use their cradles with their 700p's. With a Bluetooth receiver, any BT device with the SPP (Serial Port Profile) would be able to use it, giving you a lot more freedom and value if you ever decide to dump the Treo.
  10. #10  
    I use Telenav for $10 per month and a BT-359 GPS which I got from Cingular for $99. I keep the GPS plugged into the lighter in my arm rest which works very nicely.

    As mentioned earlier Telenav does announce the street names, but maps are only 2D. An update to the Telenav software is due shortly (June?) which will support 3D maps and traffic updates. Since Telenav is subscription based there is no charge for the updates.
    Pilot 5K->Palm IIIc->Tungsten T/T2->Treo 650/680 -> Pre+ (1.4.5 & Uberkernel)
  11. #11  
    I'm also a fan of TomTom Navigator 6. It doesn't say street names, but that's a small minus that it more than makes up for with all that it does.
    Kenji
  12. #12  
    I bought tha Palm/TomTom 6 bundle from the store here at TC, for $249 which I think is a good price. It came with TomTom 6 software (much better than 5 as your treo contacts are integrated), GPS BT reciever, charging cable and windshield/dash mount.

    I love the system, and I specifically chose it so I can use it while walking as well. A larger system, or one with the GPS receiver built into the mount (as in the new Palm bundle) wouldn't be so easy to pop into my pocket and use as I walk around Paris or wherever.

    The only downside I see is the relatively small screen size (as opposed to stand-alone GPS units), but that's true for all Treo systems; and not being able to use BlueTooth while using the GPS (for a headset or whatever). Oh, and not being able to loan the GPS unit to someone else for a trip because it is, after all, my phone.
    -mbd26
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by mbd26 View Post
    The only downside I see is the relatively small screen size (as opposed to stand-alone GPS units), but that's true for all Treo systems; and not being able to use BlueTooth while using the GPS (for a headset or whatever). Oh, and not being able to loan the GPS unit to someone else for a trip because it is, after all, my phone.
    BTW, 680 can do multiple Bluetooth connections.. I would have to guess that the 755p can as well.
  14. nerual96's Avatar
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    #14  
    Mark me down as a fanboy for Telenav. I like not having to load up my SD card with maps. They came out with an update for the Treo 700p a few weeks ago. I tried it on my 650 (even though they say V4 is the only supported version that works on the 650) and it works perfectly. This is version 5 with 3D maps, new and improved interface & much better 5 way support.
  15. #15  
    I still don't get the Telenav love.. $120/year to rely on something that has to have a cellular signal in order to operate at all. Perhaps it can download maps ahead of time, but I suspect it downloads them pretty much on the fly. Thus if you're out of coverage, you're driving blind.

    Sounds like a really bad idea.
  16. #16  
    I just bought the package from the Palm site for $ 228 (includes online rebate). An additional $ 50 is available with a mail-in rebate on top of the online discount. Its now a great value for $ 178.

    My friends rave about the quality of the hardware/application. Plus, I'm tired of those #$@Q#$ directions for my kids sporting events on the weekends. I'll also be using it for work as well.

    FlyWoody3
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by FlyWoody3 View Post
    I just bought the package from the Palm site for $ 228 (includes online rebate). An additional $ 50 is available with a mail-in rebate on top of the online discount. Its now a great value for $ 178.

    My friends rave about the quality of the hardware/application. Plus, I'm tired of those #$@Q#$ directions for my kids sporting events on the weekends. I'll also be using it for work as well.

    FlyWoody3
    Just wait until Tom Tom gives you some really dumb directions. Generally it's pretty good, but here's an example of a route it set for me once:

    1. Continue to end of Road A. Turn Right.
    2. Turn Right onto Circle Road. Drive 4 miles.
    3. Turn Right onto Road B.
    4. Turn Right onto Road A.
    (meanwhile, you pass the point at step 1.....)
    5. Turn right onto Road C. (intended destination).

    Why it did this is beyond me, but I've had similar weird routes happen a few times. One time it wanted me to turn off the main road onto a side road, drive 2 miles, then U turn, then continue down the main road.... Strange stuff it does sometimes.
  18. nerual96's Avatar
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    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by khaytsus View Post
    I still don't get the Telenav love.. $120/year to rely on something that has to have a cellular signal in order to operate at all. Perhaps it can download maps ahead of time, but I suspect it downloads them pretty much on the fly. Thus if you're out of coverage, you're driving blind.

    Sounds like a really bad idea.
    Route is downloaded at the time of request so even if you go out of service you stay connected to your route, as long as you don't go off course. I guess it goes back to usage and location. I'm in large cities or major highways most of the time so I've never had an issue.

    Your point about the expense is valid, but at the time I didn't care for the TT solution (no spoken street names). Garmin 10x or whatever doesn't work on the 650. My breakeven point is about 2 years out so I was willing to wait for something down the road.
  19. nerual96's Avatar
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    #19  
    I've seen Garmin devices and Telenav give some odd directions also. We haven't quite hit that critical point of AI to avoid these types of issues things. This stuff works well for unfamiliar areas, just not always the fastest or most direct.
  20. #20  
    Khaytsus,

    Your right, but just envision me with bad eyesight, trying to read printed Streets and Trips directions, or Google Maps. Even worse, just try MapQuest. I think the visual directions with the voice will still be a significant step up for me and quite a bit less stressful.

    FlyWoody3
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