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  1. eodell's Avatar
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    184 Global Posts
    #181  
    it did, but I wished for BT...
  2. #182  
    Yeah, I really liked my i500 very much. Used it for three years and still have it...fully functional but unfortunately it no longer fulfill my needs. The Treo is a great device has provided so much more but I really miss the i500 elegant form.
    Have a great one...Doc D.

    Phillips VELO > Palm III > Palm V > Palm 505m > Treo 180 > Treo 300 > Samsung i500 > Treo 700p > HTC 6800 > Treo 800w > Treo Pro > Palm Pre > HTC Evo
  3. #183  
    another previous i500 owner who misses it. the only plus for me and the 700p is bluetooth and evdo, and the bluetooth part of it isn't really a plus at the moment. And as far as one-handed use. Could care less. Most of my one handed operations require two hands for me anyway

    I'm not a power user in the respect I have thirty plus programs on it and use an email program to get my mail downloaded, connect remotely to servers and all that. I have agendus, aol, and a backup program essentially. I use the pda side religiously, am constantly on the phone, send and receive a lot of messages, and surf quite a bit. I have a lot of bluetooth problems, messaging problems and lag problems. Just received a brand new phone (like they thought it would solve the problem) under warranty, and I still have the problems. I have a Voyager 510 and Mot H700 headset. Both have connection problems. Could care less about what's on the approved list. What's the point of BT being a standard if it's clearly not. The 510 has had the best sound quality of any headset I've tried, and I can hear things loud and clear. I just can't connect all the time and miss calls, get resets and such.

    No need to reiterate what has been said by many. I liked it better when 3rd party manufacturers made palm devices. There was actually competition and a need to make a better product or have better support. Now there isn't. It clearly shows. It's all hardware-centric and the software is aged. Linux might be the savior, but the whole 680-755 series are all just stop-gap crap in the grand scheme of things. The 700 series shouldn't have existed at all in the 3rd generation casing. The 680/750 casing should've been the successor to the 650 all along. Then the jump to a linux based one should've been the next progression.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  4. #184  
    also....for those worried about warranty...Demand a new phone under warranty now if you've been calling about problems and such. Your replacement phone should extend the warranty about another 3 months if I'm not mistaken. I know that's what they said when I had my i500 replaced. That should carry you beyond the MR date and have a chance to see if the update brings about any other unwanted or new problems.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  5.    #185  
    Quote Originally Posted by morningstar1844 View Post
    Septimus, don't lock us down, Treo Central is the only forum that gives us a voice.
    Definitely didn't want to, still don't, hence the "simma down" post. things back on track, I am smileytime.
  6. #186  
    Quote Originally Posted by septimus View Post
    Definitely didn't want to, still don't, hence the "simma down" post. things back on track, I am smileytime.
    BIG THANKS!!!!
  7. #187  
    Wow! Reading the Palmblog responses reminds me that relatively few 700p owners know about TreoCentral, so they have had nowhere to rant for all these months.
    Daddoo
    Palm Pilot 500-->M505-->T2-->E2--->700p
  8. KJ78's Avatar
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    #188  
    Cell-phone lemon law sought by legislator

    By Monique Garcia
    Tribune staff reporter
    Published April 23, 2007

    SPRINGFIELD -- The first time her new Motorola Q phone went on the fritz, she thought it was a fluke. When her phone had to be replaced a second time, she got frustrated.

    When it malfunctioned a third time, Rep. Susana Mendoza was fed up.

    "I thought something had to be done about this. Then I thought: Wait, I can do something about this," said Mendoza, a Chicago Democrat who is sponsoring legislation to create a cell-phone lemon law.

    The proposal would allow the state's 8.5 million wireless customers to cancel their contracts without paying early termination fees if a phone must be replaced or repaired at least three times within a contract period.

    Consumers would also have the option to upgrade or downgrade phones without extending their service agreements, and companies would have to provide customers with a written statement informing them of their rights. Damage caused by consumers would not be covered.

    Mendoza's bill is pending before the full House.

    No other state has such a law on the books, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, though Tennessee is considering a similar lemon law. Other states have proposed legislation targeting poor service and dropped calls.

    Consumer advocates say the measure would hold wireless companies more accountable and discourage manufacturers from rushing to put out new products that might be faulty.

    "The more flexibility and choices, the better for consumers, and competition," said Brian Imus, director of the Illinois Public Interest Research Group.

    Industry representatives say the move would unfairly hold wireless providers responsible for manufacturing issues, make Illinois more difficult for companies to operate in, infringe on federal regulations and give customers the ability to break contracts without warrant.

    "This provides a road map for customers to get out of their contracts if all they do is complain aggressively enough," said Mike McDermott, executive director of state public policy for Verizon. "Why not let cable subscribers cancel their contracts if they have bad reception three times in a row? It's a treacherous path."

    Because wireless companies heavily discount phones for service subscribers, allowing customers an "easy way out" of their contracts would cause costs to go up and "put Illinois at the bottom of the heap for new products and services," McDermott said.

    "There are too many unintended consequences," said Rep. Sandra Pihos (R-Glen Ellyn), who voted against the bill last month in the Consumer Protection Committee. "If you can cancel a contract based on this, I don't know how they will provide stable prices for their customers at the end of the day."

    Motorola spokesman Chuck Kaiser said there have been no major problems with the Q phone and that the device, like many others, comes with a one-year warranty separate from the service agreement. Wireless providers already offer replacement programs for defective merchandise, and there is no need for lawmakers to come between a warranty agreement between consumers and manufacturers, he said.

    "Customers already have adequate remedies," Kaiser wrote in an e-mail.

    Others worry that the measure would leave room for states to create a patchwork of regulations that would infringe on an industry regulated by the federal government.

    "Wireless is a national industry, set up to be purposely responsive to market pressures and consumer demands," said Joe Farren, spokesman for CTIA-The Wireless Association, an international organization dedicated to expanding wireless service. "This puts at risk the national framework that has been so beneficial to consumers. Illinois would be an island in a national economy."

    But Mendoza said wireless companies shouldn't worry. As long as they keep customers happy and provide a quality product, little about how they operate would change.

    "When they serve a contract for two years, they should be able to keep their side of the bargain," Mendoza said.

    "That means providing a working phone and not having to spend time and money replacing it," she said. "If their service is so great, then they won't lose customers. This is not the end of the wireless industry as we know it."
  9. #189  
    Wow, this may open a whole new can-of-worms.

    I for one would like to see the trial period (at least for smartphones) extended to four weeks at least. The current 15-day period is not long enough to appropiately test these devices in my opinion.
    Have a great one...Doc D.

    Phillips VELO > Palm III > Palm V > Palm 505m > Treo 180 > Treo 300 > Samsung i500 > Treo 700p > HTC 6800 > Treo 800w > Treo Pro > Palm Pre > HTC Evo
  10. #190  
    Quote Originally Posted by KJ78 View Post
    Cell-phone lemon law sought by legislator

    By Monique Garcia
    Tribune staff reporter
    Published April 23, 2007

    SPRINGFIELD -- The first time her new Motorola Q phone went on the fritz, she thought it was a fluke. When her phone had to be replaced a second time, she got frustrated.

    When it malfunctioned a third time, Rep. Susana Mendoza was fed up.

    "I thought something had to be done about this. Then I thought: Wait, I can do something about this," said Mendoza, a Chicago Democrat who is sponsoring legislation to create a cell-phone lemon law.

    The proposal would allow the state's 8.5 million wireless customers to cancel their contracts without paying early termination fees if a phone must be replaced or repaired at least three times within a contract period.

    Consumers would also have the option to upgrade or downgrade phones without extending their service agreements, and companies would have to provide customers with a written statement informing them of their rights. Damage caused by consumers would not be covered.

    Mendoza's bill is pending before the full House.

    No other state has such a law on the books, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, though Tennessee is considering a similar lemon law. Other states have proposed legislation targeting poor service and dropped calls.

    Consumer advocates say the measure would hold wireless companies more accountable and discourage manufacturers from rushing to put out new products that might be faulty.

    "The more flexibility and choices, the better for consumers, and competition," said Brian Imus, director of the Illinois Public Interest Research Group.

    Industry representatives say the move would unfairly hold wireless providers responsible for manufacturing issues, make Illinois more difficult for companies to operate in, infringe on federal regulations and give customers the ability to break contracts without warrant.

    "This provides a road map for customers to get out of their contracts if all they do is complain aggressively enough," said Mike McDermott, executive director of state public policy for Verizon. "Why not let cable subscribers cancel their contracts if they have bad reception three times in a row? It's a treacherous path."

    Because wireless companies heavily discount phones for service subscribers, allowing customers an "easy way out" of their contracts would cause costs to go up and "put Illinois at the bottom of the heap for new products and services," McDermott said.

    "There are too many unintended consequences," said Rep. Sandra Pihos (R-Glen Ellyn), who voted against the bill last month in the Consumer Protection Committee. "If you can cancel a contract based on this, I don't know how they will provide stable prices for their customers at the end of the day."

    Motorola spokesman Chuck Kaiser said there have been no major problems with the Q phone and that the device, like many others, comes with a one-year warranty separate from the service agreement. Wireless providers already offer replacement programs for defective merchandise, and there is no need for lawmakers to come between a warranty agreement between consumers and manufacturers, he said.

    "Customers already have adequate remedies," Kaiser wrote in an e-mail.

    Others worry that the measure would leave room for states to create a patchwork of regulations that would infringe on an industry regulated by the federal government.

    "Wireless is a national industry, set up to be purposely responsive to market pressures and consumer demands," said Joe Farren, spokesman for CTIA-The Wireless Association, an international organization dedicated to expanding wireless service. "This puts at risk the national framework that has been so beneficial to consumers. Illinois would be an island in a national economy."

    But Mendoza said wireless companies shouldn't worry. As long as they keep customers happy and provide a quality product, little about how they operate would change.

    "When they serve a contract for two years, they should be able to keep their side of the bargain," Mendoza said.

    "That means providing a working phone and not having to spend time and money replacing it," she said. "If their service is so great, then they won't lose customers. This is not the end of the wireless industry as we know it."
    You know, as much as this sounds like a good thing, I think what will happen is carriers will deliberately avoid replacing the phone a third time. It will likely make support even worse because we all know that the most important thing to carriers is that you pay for that service you're subscribed to. That's why you can get a $400 phone for free nowadays.
  11. #191  
    Yep! That will definately hinder the replacement process.

    On a side note.... I thought the Q was the one being praised for its reliability and Motorola's outstanding commitment to excellence, a model by which Palm could do well to emulate
  12. #192  
    Quote Originally Posted by Merlyn_3D View Post
    You know, as much as this sounds like a good thing, I think what will happen is carriers will deliberately avoid replacing the phone a third time. It will likely make support even worse because we all know that the most important thing to carriers is that you pay for that service you're subscribed to. That's why you can get a $400 phone for free nowadays.

    I would worry about them not even replacing it the 1st time. . . .with a law like this in place. . . . . great idea . . . . but need to work out the kinks so that it has the right effect. . . not the opposite.
  13. #193  
    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Holden View Post
    I would worry about them not even replacing it the 1st time. . . .with a law like this in place. . . . . great idea . . . . but need to work out the kinks so that it has the right effect. . . not the opposite.
    Legislation based on emotional reactions usually produces unintended consequences such as those expressed by Perry and others.

    I think an extended trial period for complex devices such as PDA/phones will allow for a more thorough user-testing before commitment. Carriers already replace defective units within reason and manufacturers usually respond to bugs with regular updates and fixes (before you jump I realize Palm hasn't lately).

    In extreme cases, such as when a company neglects to provide reasonable improvements on a known faulty product, then such customer protection laws may mitigate the costs incurred by the end-user. In such cases I think would be reasonable to request an equipment refund from the carrier (equipment reseller), and early termination fee refund from the manufacturer.

    I still see problems arising from such a law like higher new phone prices to offset the potential losses related to early service cancellations. However, this may also put some heat on both carriers and manufacturers to properly test new equipment before release by taking away some of the economic incentive of the sell now, fix later business model currently in place.
    Have a great one...Doc D.

    Phillips VELO > Palm III > Palm V > Palm 505m > Treo 180 > Treo 300 > Samsung i500 > Treo 700p > HTC 6800 > Treo 800w > Treo Pro > Palm Pre > HTC Evo
  14. #194  
    yeah. no possible way she could just be the dimmest bulb on the tree. She is a politician after all...

    three shots with the same phone. That's like Brittany Spears saying all the men in her life don't know how to love a woman. Yeah, it's their problem...haha.
    Quote Originally Posted by sxtg View Post
    On a side note.... I thought the Q was the one being praised for its reliability and Motorola's outstanding commitment to excellence, a model by which Palm could do well to emulate
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  15. #195  
    Quote Originally Posted by crogs571 View Post
    yeah. no possible way she could just be the dimmest bulb on the tree. She is a politician after all...

    three shots with the same phone. That's like Brittany Spears saying all the men in her life don't know how to love a woman. Yeah, it's their problem...haha.
    LOL
  16. KJ78's Avatar
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    #196  
    Cell phone lemon law wins House approval
    SPRINGFIELD | Panel restores ComEd to rate freeze proposal

    April 27, 2007
    BY WHITNEY WOODWARD wwoodward@suntimes.com
    SPRINGFIELD -- Consumers stuck with lemon cell phones could ditch their contracts with wireless carriers under legislation that passed the Illinois House Thursday.

    That initiative capped a busy legislative day when lawmakers also voted on abortion, gun control and a potential rate freeze for ComEd customers.

    Now bound for the Senate, the cell phone legislation passed 72-43 and would enable customers to terminate or change their wireless contracts if they have phones that malfunction three times.

    "It's like anything else. You know, three strikes, you're out," said Rep. Susana Mendoza (D-Chicago), the bill's lead sponsor.

    Critics said her legislation could encourage customers to feign problems to dump unfavorable plans. Others said most cellular companies already treat customers with lemon phones fairly.

    Rep. James Durkin (R-Western Springs), an opponent, contended the plan could be unconstitutional.

    Wider notification plan fails
    On abortion, the House defeated legislation that would have allowed minors to inform adults other than their parents or a judge before obtaining the procedure.

    Favored by abortion-rights groups, the initiative that failed 55-62 was designed to broaden the pool of adults that pregnant girls could contact to fulfill a dormant 1995 parental-notification law.

    That law, which is before a federal court and could soon be enforced, requires females under 18 to notify an adult relative or receive approval from a judge. The legislation voted on Thursday would have allowed minors in dysfunctional families to notify an aunt or uncle or meet with a health professional instead.

    "This is not a referendum on abortion," said Rep. John Fritchey, the bill's lead sponsor. "It is a referendum on protecting the health and safety of young women."

    Daley loses on gun control
    On another contentious issue, a House panel voted to restore ComEd customers to an electricity rate-freeze bill the Senate passed last week and tailored only for Downstate Ameren Corp. The proposal is expected to be voted on by the full House today and sent back to the Senate.

    Finally, the House rejected two gun-control initiatives favored by Mayor Daley but opposed by the National Rifle Association. They were a proposal to require background checks for individuals seeking to buy handguns from private sellers, and an initiative to require the State Police to license handgun dealers.
  17. #197  
    Quote Originally Posted by KJ78 View Post
    Cell phone lemon law wins House approval
    SPRINGFIELD | Panel restores ComEd to rate freeze proposal

    April 27, 2007
    BY WHITNEY WOODWARD wwoodward@suntimes.com
    SPRINGFIELD -- Consumers stuck with lemon cell phones could ditch their contracts with wireless carriers under legislation that passed the Illinois House Thursday.
    Oh boy! Government to the rescue

    Others said most cellular companies already treat customers with lemon phones fairly.
    Mostly true.
    Have a great one...Doc D.

    Phillips VELO > Palm III > Palm V > Palm 505m > Treo 180 > Treo 300 > Samsung i500 > Treo 700p > HTC 6800 > Treo 800w > Treo Pro > Palm Pre > HTC Evo
  18. #198  
    Good idea, bad implementation.

    I believe this will have the reverse effect on Customer Care and consumer cost than intended.
  19. #199  
    "Industry representatives say the move would unfairly hold wireless providers responsible for manufacturing issues"

    Yet we are told that the patch must be approved by the wireless providers before it is released. Part of our problem here is the fact that the providers aren't breathing down Palm's neck. If this was going to be a dollars and cents bottom line situation for the providers, we'd have this fixed already.

    Auto manufacturers screamed over lemon laws too. They said it would cost them a fortune. It didn't. There is a legal process in place to proceed in auto cases. A similar process would work for us too.

    I'd love to see the statistics for returns/exchanges of all 'smartphones'.

    Quote Originally Posted by sxtg View Post
    Yep! That will definately hinder the replacement process.

    On a side note.... I thought the Q was the one being praised for its reliability and Motorola's outstanding commitment to excellence, a model by which Palm could do well to emulate

    I had a Verizon tech rep tell me that the Q was a problem child and to look in another direction if I was seeking a change.
  20. #200  
    ^ I was being sarcstic ;-)

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