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  1. mcwheeler's Avatar
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       #1  
    I like Sprint, but just out of curiosity I want to take advantage of Verizon's 30 day test drive, so my question is, exactly my title: can a 700p form Sprint be put on Verizon?

    Thanks to whom respond!!!!
    A.S.d.l.C
  2. #2  
    no.

    but, go to your phone screen, and hit option --> then roaming pre. force it to "Always Roam"

    --there, you can test Verizon's network
  3. #3  
    Technically it's possible since Sprint and Verizon use the same (CDMA and EvD) Rev 0), but neither one will activate any phone that's not in their ESN database, for the exact reason you just described: they don't want you buying their phones then using other carriers' service. Having to buy a new phone is a little incentive for you to stay with your current carrier.

    Now if you could get someone on the inside to do it, you would be able to get it working, but realistically, not many people want to risk their jobs just so you don't have to buy a new phone.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by mcwheeler View Post
    I like Sprint, but just out of curiosity I want to take advantage of Verizon's 30 day test drive, so my question is, exactly my title: can a 700p form Sprint be put on Verizon?

    Thanks to whom respond!!!!
    Go search howardforums. I'm sure you'll find some information there; Keywords: coreplug and esn swap. However note that you void your warranty and risk being banned from either carrier if caught.
  5. #5  
    I thought there was an FCC ruling that stated locking phones like this was now illegal?
  6. #6  
    Suer would be nice if I could get a "Sprint" 700p to work on Verizon. I have a "spare" 700p and would lvoe to give it to my GF...but she's on Verizon...
    Dave
    Sprint Pre User Who LOVED his Pre but left for a more supported phone (EVO Shift)...maybe one day Sprint & HP will see the light and bring us a great 4g capable Pre replacement!
  7. #7  
    I wouldnt really call a 700p a present... at least until the patch is released
  8. eodell's Avatar
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Chasealicious11 View Post
    I wouldnt really call a 700p a present... at least until the patch is released
    lol, 700p.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Chasealicious11 View Post
    I wouldnt really call a 700p a present... at least until the patch is released
    I really don't have any problems with my 700p to speak of...
    Dave
    Sprint Pre User Who LOVED his Pre but left for a more supported phone (EVO Shift)...maybe one day Sprint & HP will see the light and bring us a great 4g capable Pre replacement!
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by perry_rob View Post
    I thought there was an FCC ruling that stated locking phones like this was now illegal?
    Anyone with info to back this up...?
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by BMIC50 View Post
    Anyone with info to back this up...?
    It applies to SIM locked GSM phones. Sprint and VZW are Network locked, and are exempt from this.
    MaxiMunK.com The Forum That Asks, "Are You Not Entertained?"

    Remember: "Anyone that thinks the Treo should just work right out of the box, shouldn't own a Treo..."
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Insertion View Post
    It applies to SIM locked GSM phones. Sprint and VZW are Network locked, and are exempt from this.
    Intereesting. I wonder why this exemption exists? Is the law supposed to protect us from Networks locking our phones or is it just to protect the SIM card's transferability?
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by BMIC50 View Post
    Intereesting. I wonder why this exemption exists? Is the law supposed to protect us from Networks locking our phones or is it just to protect the SIM card's transferability?
    I can't remember the reasoning off the top of my head. Perhaps since it's easier to just drop a SIM into any GSM phone, they deem anyone should be allowed to.

    There are exemptions though. If a GSM phone is tied to a particular service, the carrier can still lock it. For instance, the Sidekick can be locked to T-Mobile, because the data is stored on their servers. I would suspect that the iPhone will also be exempt from the new rulings, thus Cingular will be able to lock it.

    But for the most part, GSM phones are supposed to be unlocked, and CDMA phones can remain locked.
    MaxiMunK.com The Forum That Asks, "Are You Not Entertained?"

    Remember: "Anyone that thinks the Treo should just work right out of the box, shouldn't own a Treo..."
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Insertion View Post
    I can't remember the reasoning off the top of my head. Perhaps since it's easier to just drop a SIM into any GSM phone, they deem anyone should be allowed to.

    There are exemptions though. If a GSM phone is tied to a particular service, the carrier can still lock it. For instance, the Sidekick can be locked to T-Mobile, because the data is stored on their servers. I would suspect that the iPhone will also be exempt from the new rulings, thus Cingular will be able to lock it.

    But for the most part, GSM phones are supposed to be unlocked, and CDMA phones can remain locked.
    If I were an opportunist, and need to switch from Sprint (but I may want a device from Verizon), I would say that there could be grounds for litigation. But I dont know all and wouldnt want to have egg on my face!

    I guess my main problem is that the Networks all benefit from people swapping. And as such, they should make it easier to do so. I mean, dont they make more money on the service than the hardware? Even if they provided PIM transfer for non-SIM phones/devices for those looking to keep their phones, they would get more people to transfer. Then you can hook them with not being able to insure a non-network phone and when that phone breaks, they can sell the hardware at full price! I mean, making the transfer process cheaper would help new contract sales (maybe if youre 1st to offer such a program).
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Insertion View Post
    I can't remember the reasoning off the top of my head. Perhaps since it's easier to just drop a SIM into any GSM phone, they deem anyone should be allowed to.

    There are exemptions though. If a GSM phone is tied to a particular service, the carrier can still lock it. For instance, the Sidekick can be locked to T-Mobile, because the data is stored on their servers. I would suspect that the iPhone will also be exempt from the new rulings, thus Cingular will be able to lock it.

    But for the most part, GSM phones are supposed to be unlocked, and CDMA phones can remain locked.
    But the sidekick should still be able to be used as a regular phone on other GSM carriers once unlocked right? Don't have a Sidekick, but I'm sure this is the type of situation that the FCC wanted; People should be able to use their phones (even if some of the functionality is limited, such as a Sidekick) on any appropriate carrier (GSM phone on GSM carrier).

    As far as Sprint and Verizon...the issue is that the phones aren't exactly locked..for starters, Sprint and Verizon phones can be put on any CDMA carrier as long as you have the MSL code (Master Subsidy Lock). Technically, under the new FCC ruling, I guess it would mean that Sprint and Verizon should give you your MSL if you ask for it, but most of the time their CS is trained not to do so. Some even believe that knowing your MSL voids the warranty on the phone (at least I've heard of something along those lines for Sprint). But I have heard of people in other parts of the world using Sprint and Verizon phones (I recently saw one post on SprintUsers from a guy in the Ukraine trying to program his 6700 for use over there)

    Once you have the MSL, the phone can be programmed to work on other CDMA carriers, Unless there's some other software implemented to block this; Ex: My Samsung A900 automatically closes the dial pad when you dial *228, which is the code you use to activate Verizon phones I think. I'm sure they put it there just so you wouldn't be able to use the phone on Verizon.

    After you get past that potential hurdle, the last hurdle to jump is getting the carrier to activate the phone. This is the major hurdle that prevents you from easily using a Sprint phone on Verizon and vice versa: many CDMA carriers (at least in the US) won't activate a phone that isn't in their ESN database, or doesn't have their logo on it. Basically, if it doesn't say Sprint on it, Sprint won't activate it. There were also a few cases of ppl not being able to activate their 700p's that they bought from a Palm store because the ESN's of the phones weren't in Sprint's database, although I'm sure that was quickly resolved.

    Sorry for the long post, but basically, you need to know the MSL, and you need a carrier that doesn't care what the carrier the phone is branded for or if the ESN is in their database. So technically, it's not that Sprint and Verizon are locking the phones, but rather that they're not activating ones from other carriers that prevents you from switching back and forth.

    I don't think it would be worth it to use Sprint phones on Verizon and vice versa, just because of some of the service incompatabilities (Sprint Music Store vs. Vcast, MMS vs. Picturemail, etc.)
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by BMIC50 View Post
    I guess my main problem is that the Networks all benefit from people swapping. And as such, they should make it easier to do so. I mean, dont they make more money on the service than the hardware? Even if they provided PIM transfer for non-SIM phones/devices for those looking to keep their phones, they would get more people to transfer. Then you can hook them with not being able to insure a non-network phone and when that phone breaks, they can sell the hardware at full price! I mean, making the transfer process cheaper would help new contract sales (maybe if youre 1st to offer such a program).
    But the issue is that if someone wants to take their Verizon phone to Sprint, and they can keep their same phone, what incentive is there for that person to stay with Verizon? Sure they'll pay the ETF if they're still in contract, but they wouldn't have to buy another phone, which may have cost as much or more as the ETF anyways.

    Another issue is if you could swap phones like that, then people who would normally switch service just for a phone would just buy the phone and keep their current service. This could even lead to the carrier not having enough of a certain phone for their own customers because people from other carriers came and bought them all.

    Basically, I don't think there's any benefit to the carriers from people swapping. I know I would have bought a Samsung A990 (Verizon only) but kept my Sprint service if I could have. But because Sprint won't activate Verizon phones, I would either have to switch to Verizon completely and pay Sprint an ETF, or just not have the phone. I chose to skip the phone and keep Sprint, which is what all the carriers want.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevante View Post
    But the issue is that if someone wants to take their Verizon phone to Sprint, and they can keep their same phone, what incentive is there for that person to stay with Verizon? Sure they'll pay the ETF if they're still in contract, but they wouldn't have to buy another phone, which may have cost as much or more as the ETF anyways.

    Another issue is if you could swap phones like that, then people who would normally switch service just for a phone would just buy the phone and keep their current service. This could even lead to the carrier not having enough of a certain phone for their own customers because people from other carriers came and bought them all.

    Basically, I don't think there's any benefit to the carriers from people swapping.
    I dont know of any Network that will just sell you a phone at the reduced price and allow you to keep it if you decide to ditch the service (after their 'test drive'). But if I would like to buy a phone outright, without a plan, then why not get the $ from that purchase? And if supplies get low, then they could deny non-network customers. But that isnt what I was getting at.

    The facilitation I mentioned would allow people the choice (perceived mostly) of keeping their phone, which would make it EASIER to get non-network customers into their network. The ETF would still be there, but if you are offering a simple ESN transfer if they dont wanna pony up for a new phone, then they wouldnt mind becoming a part of your network. The penalty is the ETF...the phone is yours, and you should be able to use it! And think, if youre the 1st network to offer this easy transfer (Sprint to Verizon or vice versa, but you would have to offer a free PIM transfer for CDMA to GSM or vice versa) and you would get a headstart in the market!

    Let's face it...people will leave regardless. But you have the possibility to appeal to those who want to keep the device they like if your network doesnt offer it but have their contract. How many people are stuck to their networks just because of the type of device they have? How many are gonna jump ship to AT&T for the iPhone?
  18. #18  
    And I tell you what..! I will jump ship to the 1st hybrid network that uses GSM for voice and CDMA for data. To have a powerful device like that would broaden Sprint's appeal, kill AT&T, and globalize their efforts simultaneously!
  19. #19  
    If we assume that you purchase a subsidised phone, execute and complete your contract to pay the carrier back for the discounted phone (so it's totaly yours), it seems rather unfair that I can't take MY phone to another carrier within the same cell technology/frequencies.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by MilenkoD View Post
    If we assume that you purchase a subsidised phone, execute and complete your contract to pay the carrier back for the discounted phone (so it's totaly yours), it seems rather unfair that I can't take MY phone to another carrier within the same cell technology/frequencies.
    Exactly what I mean! Eventually, you will buy a phone from their network so why not just make you happy initially?!
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