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  1. tc600's Avatar
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    #21  
    Not exactly what the OP had in mind, but there are services which let users swap their contracts (and optionally their phones), like this one:
    http://celltradeusa.com/

    You could also try to do a swap in the Marketplace sub-forum here at TreoCentral ...
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by MilenkoD View Post
    If we assume that you purchase a subsidised phone, execute and complete your contract to pay the carrier back for the discounted phone (so it's totaly yours), it seems rather unfair that I can't take MY phone to another carrier within the same cell technology/frequencies.
    That's the point, it is unfair, and the carriers want it that way.

    I dont know of any Network that will just sell you a phone at the reduced price and allow you to keep it if you decide to ditch the service (after their 'test drive'). But if I would like to buy a phone outright, without a plan, then why not get the $ from that purchase? And if supplies get low, then they could deny non-network customers. But that isnt what I was getting at.
    I'm quite positive that if you complete the test period (after 30 days) that you can keep the phone if you cancel service on most, if not all carriers. I've never heard of anyone outside of the trial period having to return their phones when canceling service. If you cancel your contract a month before it's over, do you have to return the phone? I've never heard of any such case...

    And yes they could get the profit from selling the phone outright, but that's not where the real money is at. Remember, these cell phone carriers are companies, and the main goal of a company is usually to maximize profit. Why make a $100 profit of a phone when you can make a $200 profit from a couple months of service? (those numbers are just for demonstration, I have no idea what the real life figures are).

    The facilitation I mentioned would allow people the choice (perceived mostly) of keeping their phone, which would make it EASIER to get non-network customers into their network. The ETF would still be there, but if you are offering a simple ESN transfer if they dont wanna pony up for a new phone, then they wouldnt mind becoming a part of your network. The penalty is the ETF...the phone is yours, and you should be able to use it! And think, if youre the 1st network to offer this easy transfer (Sprint to Verizon or vice versa, but you would have to offer a free PIM transfer for CDMA to GSM or vice versa) and you would get a headstart in the market!
    And it also makes it easier for current customers to jump ship to other carriers, which is what the carriers don't want. Basically, it's more likely that a customer will jump ship than that there more people itching to switch over but won't do it because they can't use their current phone on another carrier.

    Like I said in the begining of this post, it's unfair and the carriers want it that way; they don't want you to have less reason to re-consider jumping ship.

    Let's face it...people will leave regardless. But you have the possibility to appeal to those who want to keep the device they like if your network doesnt offer it but have their contract. How many people are stuck to their networks just because of the type of device they have? How many are gonna jump ship to AT&T for the iPhone?
    Lots of people plan on switching just for the iPhone, and yes, people to jump carriers just to get a certain phone. The point I'm making is that the way the carriers see it, it's better to keep your current customers than to try (with no guarantee of success) and grab customers from other carriers based on them being able to use any phone they want (assuming it's compatible). What's to stop them from switching to Carrier A from Carrier B, then switching back to Carrier A if they don't have to change their device the entire time?

    If the carriers prevent you from using your phone with other carriers, you're more likely to say "Hmm..I spent $400 on this phone and if i switch, it'll be useless to me. If I sell it, I won't get as much as I paid for it. Maybe I should just keep the phone and carrier instead of losing money, because I'll still to buy another phone from Carrier B"
  3. #23  
    Great points, Trevante.

    I think I have strayed too far from my original idea, which is making the CDMA networks accept other phones just like the GSM networks. I wanna know why the law protects SIM carded devices but CDMA devices arent. I dont plan on taking my Sprint 700p to expensive-behind Verizon, but if I did, I wouldnt want to buy their version of the same phone!
  4. #24  
    I understand what you're saying. I know Sprint is pretty slow to get new phones and there are some Verizon phones I wish I could have seen on Sprint. But the underlying issue is that they won't activate foreign phones, not necessarily that the phones are always locked to prevent carrier swapping. In this case, that law doesn't apply. I'm sure they could eventually force them to allow foreign phones, just so it would be similar to the GSM side of things, but then there'd be all kinds of issues like:

    1. Customer support. I believe Cingular and T-Mobile don't offer CS for phones that aren't Cingular and T-Mobile branded.
    2. Software and service incompatbilities - Sprint uses Picturemail instead of just standard MMS, so that would make life difficult if you had a Sprint phone on Verizon, where Verizon just uses MMS.

    It would just be kind of messy, and probably not that great for business, which is probably why the lawmakers haven't done so yet.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevante View Post
    I understand what you're saying. I know Sprint is pretty slow to get new phones and there are some Verizon phones I wish I could have seen on Sprint. But the underlying issue is that they won't activate foreign phones, not necessarily that the phones are always locked to prevent carrier swapping. In this case, that law doesn't apply. I'm sure they could eventually force them to allow foreign phones, just so it would be similar to the GSM side of things, but then there'd be all kinds of issues like:

    1. Customer support. I believe Cingular and T-Mobile don't offer CS for phones that aren't Cingular and T-Mobile branded.
    2. Software and service incompatbilities - Sprint uses Picturemail instead of just standard MMS, so that would make life difficult if you had a Sprint phone on Verizon, where Verizon just uses MMS.

    It would just be kind of messy, and probably not that great for business, which is probably why the lawmakers haven't done so yet.
    I wouldnt expect CS for another branded phone, even if its the same model. But you have brought to light some issues w/ sprint that needs addressing! That dang Picturemail! MMS is the way to go! They were one of the last to use SMS and not that stupid web-based text messaging service they had! I guess its cheaper, and pushes a bigger product purchase (internet, or PCSVision).

    Sprint once had the advantage of having exclusivity to phones 1st. Now the tables have turned and Sprint's only ace in the hole is their EV-DO advantage (quicker Rev A rollout).
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by BMIC50 View Post
    I wouldnt expect CS for another branded phone, even if its the same model. But you have brought to light some issues w/ sprint that needs addressing! That dang Picturemail! MMS is the way to go! They were one of the last to use SMS and not that stupid web-based text messaging service they had! I guess its cheaper, and pushes a bigger product purchase (internet, or PCSVision).

    Sprint once had the advantage of having exclusivity to phones 1st. Now the tables have turned and Sprint's only ace in the hole is their EV-DO advantage (quicker Rev A rollout).
    You wouldn't expect it, but other people would, and the carriers don't want to deal with that. What about Joe Blow down the street that doesn't understand why his Sprint phone on Verizon won't send pictures properly? Joe Blow doesn't understand that his phone doesn't use MMS, and since he's not a Sprint customer anymore, who's he gonna call? Verizon of course. And then Verizon CS is going to say "Sorry, but we don't know anything about that Sprint phone or Picturemail, so we can't help you".

    Ah man I remember those days..."Short mail" hahaha... I hated that stuff. It was even worse because I'd have to get online to answer my text messages and miss calls while doing so. I like the idea of being able to upload pics with Picturemail, but I'd still prefer regular MMS for receiving pics, getting a link is lame and time wasting.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevante View Post
    You wouldn't expect it, but other people would, and the carriers don't want to deal with that. What about Joe Blow down the street that doesn't understand why his Sprint phone on Verizon won't send pictures properly? Joe Blow doesn't understand that his phone doesn't use MMS, and since he's not a Sprint customer anymore, who's he gonna call? Verizon of course. And then Verizon CS is going to say "Sorry, but we don't know anything about that Sprint phone or Picturemail, so we can't help you".

    Ah man I remember those days..."Short mail" hahaha... I hated that stuff. It was even worse because I'd have to get online to answer my text messages and miss calls while doing so. I like the idea of being able to upload pics with Picturemail, but I'd still prefer regular MMS for receiving pics, getting a link is lame and time wasting.
    Well, CS doesnt know crap about the devices they DO support! So it wouldnt be any different! The fix-all is to remove the battery and wait 2 minutes and then re-install! (Ohk...I'm exaggerating some) The average Joe Blow would waste his time actually listening to said advice. Besides, the Rep who transfers the device would make it clear that he/she cannot expect the same services and that would be their prompt to pitch an in-network device.

    Yeah...that dreaded short-mail! Who's brilliant idea was that...!!?? Cant MMS send ringtones and other files? Been on Sprint all of my life, so I wouldnt know!
  8. #28  
    Maybe the manufacturers should go back to supporting thier own devices.

    It makes more sense that Motorola (or any other manufacturer) could become familiar with the service providers much easier than the providers becoming familiar with several different devices anyway.
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