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  1.    #1  
    Does anyone ever have trouble with their Treo interfering with other electronics? Like on my laptop or desktop if I have headphones on and listening to music if my treo gets a text or is using the internet I get horrid system noise from the computer.

    It took me forever to figure out what was making the noise I thought at first my sound card was defective until I heard it on my laptop... Then realize when I tether and listen to music I get horrid system noise, so I moved the treo about 6 feet away and everything was fine...

    Has anyone had trouble with the treo leaking interference out? Can we ***** to the FCC and maybe that will rush the update? (also note no other cell phone I have tried has caused this probelm)
  2. #2  
    almost all cell phones I've used in the past interered with my car's stereo.
    Treoing & Loving it
  3. vMAC's Avatar
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    #3  
    I doubt it. I haven't noticed it with my Treo, but that could be for a couple different reasons. I used to have a Sanyo phone (BTW best phones for reception that you can get with Sprint) and a Sony Trinitron CRT monitor. I could tell about 5 secs before I was getting a call if that phone was anywhere near my TV (Also a Sony CRT) or my computer monitor. The screen would get distorted then about 2 secs later the phone would start ringing. It was awesome I personally loved that because if I had Quake II to loud I wouldn't hear it ringing. LOL

    ******End of off topic story********
  4. #4  
    Yeah, GSM phones mess with your speakers & CDMA phones distort monitors. I much prefer the monitor distortion, I hate that speaker buzz.
    I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by fleeing the scene of the accident!
  5. #5  
    My wife has a Pearl and we always know in advance when she's about to get an email while driving in the car.
    iPhone 4S
    Former Treo & Storm Owner
    Cigar Lover
  6. #6  
    I put up with that annoying speaker buzz for a long time with Cingular. I switched to Sprint about a year ago when the 700p launched and I was happy to learn the speaker buzz went away.

    I am on conference calls regularly where someone's GSM phone causes that annoying buzz. I no longer have to wonder if its my phone
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > Treo 700p > Treo 700wx -> Mogul -> Touch Pro
    You may like to flash, but your phone shouldn't. LED Killer
  7. #7  
    Yes, it is RFI from the phone and I have to wonder how Palm got it past FCC certification, or what accountant figured out it was all right to remove RFI shielding from the phones.

    Also note that the Treos are among the highest emitters on the SAR lists, they are 10x worse than the Razr phones and come in JUST under the maximum allowable limits. Using an earbud so you can keep the phone away from your head becomes a Very Good Idea.

    Some very UNimpressive engineering.
  8. #8  
    The buzz is caused by all TDMA phones including GSM.

    The transmitter is constantly being switched on & off, which creates the buzz.

    The loudness and degree of interference can depend on how much power the phone is putting out and proximity to the device receiving interference.

    CDMA phones do not seem to exhibit this behavior.

    Sprint Pre & Motorola H300 BT headset

    Dead devices: Palm Pro; Palm III; Treo 600, 650, 700p, 755p; Centro
    Yes, I finally updated my tagline!
  9. #9  
    DJ, my understanding, which may be incorrect, is that TDMA is a variation under GSM, not the other way around. GSM phones are not TDMA phones, but TDMA phones are GSM phones, from what I've read.

    But, my TDMA Startac never made a computer or a car radio or TV go deedle-deedle the way the Treo *always* does. TDMA phones didn't do this. CDMA2000 phones--which are also technically GSM phones--also don't do this. "Pure" GSM Treos do this, but I've never met another GSM phone that did.

    (If you have a new-ish Verizon phone, what they call CDMA today is not CDMA, it is CDMA-2000. They will no longer provide service to new customers who have their older "real" CDMA phones, high or low band or both. And CDMA-2000 is...Ready for this? Apparently another sub-version of GSM too.)

    How to make it easy to screw the customers: First, make sure the entire industry uses jargon, or better yet, gibberish. Guarantees the customers can't communicate to each other either.

    Or, in Verizon's famous words, "CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?!"

    (Boy, they must have pissed off someone at their ad agency to get that line stuck on 'em.<G>)
  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
    DJ, my understanding, which may be incorrect, is that TDMA is a variation under GSM, not the other way around. GSM phones are not TDMA phones, but TDMA phones are GSM phones, from what I've read.

    But, my TDMA Startac never made a computer or a car radio or TV go deedle-deedle the way the Treo *always* does. TDMA phones didn't do this. CDMA2000 phones--which are also technically GSM phones--also don't do this. "Pure" GSM Treos do this, but I've never met another GSM phone that did.

    (If you have a new-ish Verizon phone, what they call CDMA today is not CDMA, it is CDMA-2000. They will no longer provide service to new customers who have their older "real" CDMA phones, high or low band or both. And CDMA-2000 is...Ready for this? Apparently another sub-version of GSM too.)

    How to make it easy to screw the customers: First, make sure the entire industry uses jargon, or better yet, gibberish. Guarantees the customers can't communicate to each other either.

    Or, in Verizon's famous words, "CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?!"

    (Boy, they must have pissed off someone at their ad agency to get that line stuck on 'em.<G>)
    TDMA is just a type of coding that GSM uses also iden uses it... CDMA is another type of coding.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
    DJ, my understanding, which may be incorrect, is that TDMA is a variation under GSM, not the other way around. GSM phones are not TDMA phones, but TDMA phones are GSM phones, from what I've read.

    But, my TDMA Startac never made a computer or a car radio or TV go deedle-deedle the way the Treo *always* does. TDMA phones didn't do this. CDMA2000 phones--which are also technically GSM phones--also don't do this. "Pure" GSM Treos do this, but I've never met another GSM phone that did.

    (If you have a new-ish Verizon phone, what they call CDMA today is not CDMA, it is CDMA-2000. They will no longer provide service to new customers who have their older "real" CDMA phones, high or low band or both. And CDMA-2000 is...Ready for this? Apparently another sub-version of GSM too.)

    How to make it easy to screw the customers: First, make sure the entire industry uses jargon, or better yet, gibberish. Guarantees the customers can't communicate to each other either.

    Or, in Verizon's famous words, "CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?!"

    (Boy, they must have pissed off someone at their ad agency to get that line stuck on 'em.<G>)
    Actually, TDMA is a method of timesharing a single frequency, hence the name "Time Division Multiplexing" (TDM). Since GSM uses the TDM technique, it is therefore a subset of TDMA.

    I had a StarTac TDMA phone on Cingular's network and it did create a lot of buzzing interference in radios, ipods, televisions, computer monitors, and even in attached headsets to the phone! In 2005 I switched to Sprint and got a CDMA treo and all these problems disappeared.

    The reason for TDMA interference is that the transmitter is always switching on and off. Let's say your TDMA (or GSM) phone has a call in progress. And let's say that the amount of power it is outputting is 1/2 watt (because the closest tower is a couple miles away). Your voice is digitized into a buffer. Every 1/3 of a fraction of a second, the phone's transmitter switches on and transmits a portion of that buffer over the air. Then for 2/3 of that fraction of a second the transmitter is off. Then the process repeats continuously during the call. When your phone is transmitting at 1/2 watt, electronic devices in close proximity to the phone may pick up on the signal and get noise from it, as is true with ANY radio-frequency transmitting device.

    Yes, that means that CDMA phones can and do interfere as well.

    However, TDMA is unique in that the transmitter is rapidly switching on and off, and that creates an audible (or visible) effect. You won't notice it (as much or at all) with CDMA as CDMA is not rapidly switching. CDMA does vary the power output of the transmitter.

    If you have a walkie-talkie (the old fashioned CBs work best, but the FRS will also work!) you can simulate TDMA by holding it up to a TV set and rapidly click the transmit button. If you just hold the transmit button you may see a difference, but it won't be as pronounced.

    Bottom line: there is more RFI noise created by TDMA than CDMA because of the rapid switching of the transmitter.

    Sprint Pre & Motorola H300 BT headset

    Dead devices: Palm Pro; Palm III; Treo 600, 650, 700p, 755p; Centro
    Yes, I finally updated my tagline!
  12. #12  
    Thanks, Handy. I guess that just means the old engineers at Motorola were and are better engineers than whoever Palm is contracting with, since my old Mots never ever made RFI, even when parked on other devices, over all the years.
  13. SMEGGIE's Avatar
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    #13  
    I only experience interference when talking on my phone in/through my car and when my radar detector is in use...



    SMEGGIE
    Yer pal,

    SMEGGIE


    A bigger Treo fan than I'll admit.
  14. #14  
    Motorola's been around a long time, but that said, my StarTac 7897 created a lot of unwanted "buzz."

    Sprint Pre & Motorola H300 BT headset

    Dead devices: Palm Pro; Palm III; Treo 600, 650, 700p, 755p; Centro
    Yes, I finally updated my tagline!
  15. z3bum's Avatar
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    #15  
    My original Sprint Spectrum Motorola GSM phone made the buzz, as did my GSM Star Tac. All my GSM Treos have done the same. I can always tell when I about about to get a call or receive an email. Fyi, I always thought the maximum transmit power for GSM devices was 100 milliwatts.
    Palm III -> Palm V -> Blue Palm Vx w/Omnisky -> Treo 270 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> Treo 680
  16. #16  
    100mw might be the limit for GSM, if there really is one less than 3W.

    Sprint Pre & Motorola H300 BT headset

    Dead devices: Palm Pro; Palm III; Treo 600, 650, 700p, 755p; Centro
    Yes, I finally updated my tagline!
  17.    #17  
    100mw thats crazy... Most wireless routers run at 30mw or below..

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