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  1.    #1  
    Get it? "Driving?" GPS? In the car? Get it? .........................

    Anywho, I can't decide. On one hand, the idea of having GPS software and a receiver for my 700wx is enticing, especially since I have a 4GB SD card to hold the software. However, I worry about the issues with me getting a call and then not being able to continue the navigation, a text message coming thru, my wireless sync acting up...

    So I'm leaning towards a simple solution like the TomTom One to have in the car.

    But I like the idea of just having one device at the same time.... Do you see why this is "driving" me crazy? I've been doing this for over 3 months: reading reviews, reading this board, going to stores, etc. I can't decide, so I now leave the decision in your hands (which is scary). Decide away!
  2. #2  
    I have been using Nav 5 in my car for several months. On the highway, I switch to other programs, including the phone, all the time. When I switch back to TomTom, it normally re-syncs very quickly. I might see a problem if I am driving in traffic with lots of turns, but I also will normally ask to call back if I am in busy traffic anyway.

    I have seen reports that Nav 6 is much better when you receive a phone call, and in fact have seen reports that people play music (PocketTunes) in the background while following TomTom.

    Short answer. No matter what the issues with interruptions in the directions, I would be VERY unhappy without having TomTom when I am driving somewhere.

    John
  3. xsavior's Avatar
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    #3  
    I have TomTom on my 700p, and so far i only miss a few small features that my old garmin standalone had. With this set up, i do get kicked out of TomTom if i take a call, but as long as i'm not using a bluetooth head set, i can get back into TomTom while still on the call, and it will automatically reconnect to the reciever in under a minute, and then recalculate your route from where ever you are. It's a small extra step, but i have found it very easy to deal with. The other thing i'll say about it is that i never leave it in my car anymore, which is where my last one was stolen from, so by having one device (and a TINY reciever), it makes it much easier to keep track of. Hope that helps
  4. #4  
    I have the Garmin GPS 10, not TomTom, but my experience is similar to the previous posters. Playing music or answering phone calls while navigating is no problem. Still, I would have to say that if I wanted GPS in the car ONLY, I'd go for a dedicated unit. However, if you want one device that (a) you always have with you (yes the car units are portable, but how often will you actually take it out of the car) and (b) can be carried in your pocket and (c) can work with topo as well as street maps, even on the same SD card, then I think you want one of the Treo GPS solutions. That was my deciding factor.
  5. #5  
    I have been using GPS with my cell phone for over two years now. With work, I end up using it on a weekly basis, if not daily.

    I am using a WM device though. With iGuidance, which is my personal favorite, the GPS will still work and show you everything you need to do, but will suspend only the voice prompts while on the phone. There may be a hack around that, but I have never looked.

    The thought of having just one more thing to carry around (including plugs, any accessories, antenaes, etc..) just sounds horrible to me when I can get all the same features and use with only my cell phone.

    Here are some reviews and resources for different options:


    Add GPS, you won't regret it if you travel....


  6. xsavior's Avatar
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    #6  
    I agree with Hobbes as i end up traveling alot to places that i've never been before in the us, it becomes a weekly thing to use my gps in a new environment, and i like to keep what i have to pack for each trip minimal. I'm curious about the Garmin when they come out with the new version in november, bobodobo, have you ever had a chance to do a side by side with your Garmin and the TomTom 6?
  7. #7  
    For the record, Chatter notifications of new emails (via the pop-up) work great with tomtom -- they pop up, you can scroll and read them, and reply right from that window if needed. if not, you close the pop-up, and you're still in tomtom.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Xsavior View Post
    I agree with Hobbes as i end up traveling alot to places that i've never been before in the us, it becomes a weekly thing to use my gps in a new environment, and i like to keep what i have to pack for each trip minimal. I'm curious about the Garmin when they come out with the new version in november, bobodobo, have you ever had a chance to do a side by side with your Garmin and the TomTom 6?
    Simple answer is no, I haven't compared Garmin and TomTom. I'm married to Garmin since I've been buying their units for a long time and have a lot invested in their map data bases - all of which work fine on my GPS 10, even topos. So the Garmin Palm OS system would have to really suck before I would buy a TomTom.

    Having said that, the things that impress me about the GPS 10 are how well all the various parts of the application work together and how cooperative it is with other programs running in the background, like PocketTunes and the Phone app. Also the points of interest find and manage features are really good. And the program is really stable, it NEVER crashes the Palm. Maybe TomTom is just as good in these areas.

    The weakness of the Garmin is in the interface, it's functional but not very elegant looking or easy to use without pulling out the stylus. It's especially difficult to use while driving (of course, you're not supposed to do that anyway, but everyone does...) The Mobile XT software should fix that, hopefully it won't compromise the stability and versatility of the underlying "engine."

    While Garmin and TomTom have been discussed in many threads here, maybe we should start a specic Garmin vs. TomTom thread after Mobile XT is released...
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by lawilson2 View Post
    Get it? "Driving?" GPS? In the car? Get it? .........................
    Don't take this wrong, but if you have to explain the joke.....

    Anyway, here's my take: If you only plan to use the GPS in a car, get a dedicated GPS. Larger, more readable screens, more powerful processors and better software (= faster recalc of routes). In general, you'll get more sophisticated routing capabilities (ability to add more via points, store more routes, flexibility in choosing routing parameters (fastest, shortest, avoid highways, favor highways, avoid toll roads, etc.).

    If you want something you can use on foot, then maybe the Palm based solutions offer something, but you've still got multiple peices to deal with, and I don't know if any run on battery, or if they have to be plugged into your car.

    You can buy dedicated GPS units that have built in rechargeable batteries for handheld use, and plug into your lighter socket for car use. Dedicated can give you speach synthesis of road names, too.

    It's sort of like comparing a Treo to a Razor: yes, you can store contacts, calendar entries and such in a plain cell phone, but it doesn't do it nearly as well as a true PIM, like the Palm. Same with GPS. Yes, the Treo can do it, but not as well as a dedicated unit.

    As for brand, I've tried a bunch, and Garmin is the cream of the crop. TomTom, Magellan, and various newcomers are getting closer, but none yet combine the power and ease of use (and the variety of units) that Garmin does.

    My 2 cents worth.
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    If you want something you can use on foot, then maybe the Palm based solutions offer something, but you've still got multiple peices to deal with, and I don't know if any run on battery, or if they have to be plugged into your car.
    Both a bluetooth GPS receiver and a Treo will run for many hours on internal batteries. Great for hiking and/or biking. As far as multiple pieces, it's true you need to have the GPS receiver with you but it's very compact and can be put in your pocket so you only "carry" the Treo while navigating.
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    Don't take this wrong, but if you have to explain the joke.....

    Anyway, here's my take: If you only plan to use the GPS in a car, get a dedicated GPS. Larger, more readable screens, more powerful processors and better software (= faster recalc of routes). In general, you'll get more sophisticated routing capabilities (ability to add more via points, store more routes, flexibility in choosing routing parameters (fastest, shortest, avoid highways, favor highways, avoid toll roads, etc.).

    If you want something you can use on foot, then maybe the Palm based solutions offer something, but you've still got multiple peices to deal with, and I don't know if any run on battery, or if they have to be plugged into your car.

    You can buy dedicated GPS units that have built in rechargeable batteries for handheld use, and plug into your lighter socket for car use. Dedicated can give you speach synthesis of road names, too.

    It's sort of like comparing a Treo to a Razor: yes, you can store contacts, calendar entries and such in a plain cell phone, but it doesn't do it nearly as well as a true PIM, like the Palm. Same with GPS. Yes, the Treo can do it, but not as well as a dedicated unit.

    As for brand, I've tried a bunch, and Garmin is the cream of the crop. TomTom, Magellan, and various newcomers are getting closer, but none yet combine the power and ease of use (and the variety of units) that Garmin does.

    My 2 cents worth.
    For the record, the explanation of the joke was the joke.

    Anyway, I agree with you. When I upgrade my home office, I separated everything. I now have a dedicated page scanner, dedicated color laser, and dedicated copier. Why? One goes down, all is not down unlike an all in one, plus you tend to get more features with separate units.

    So your point is well taken about having a dedicated GPS. Even if I put it on my WX, I still have to carry a receiver, so I might as well consider a small device like the Tom Tom One or Garmin as you and others praise so highly. I'm very close to my decision to get one, and I hope to make a decision by this Friday since I need to go out to Fry's anyway, which is a 35 min drive from my house. Thanks!
  12. #12  
    One other thing to consider. There are actually 3 types of devices that should be mentioned in this discussion:

    1. Dedicated car units
    2. Units that interface with a PDA, like Garmin GPS 10/10x or TomTom 5/6
    3. Hand-held "outdoor" units, e.g. Garmin eTrex Vista/VistaC/VistaCx.

    I mention this 3rd category because it has 3 things that the others don't:

    1. A degree of water-proofness and dirt-proofness. (Nice but not essential)
    2. A barometric altimeter (Nice but definitely not essential)
    3. A built-in compass (very very useful for hiking, otherwise you don't know which direction to go until you start moving and see if it's the right direction or not, then you have to constantly "steer" in the desired direction.)

    Obviously 1 is best for car-only, 3 is best for outdoor-only, and 2 is best for convergence, but a compromise in terms of car and outdoor performance.

    Just another piece of information designed to "drive" you crazier...
  13.    #13  
    Hi, thanks for responding to this thread; I had forgotten about it today. After much research and testing out various models, I invested in the Garmin Nuvi 660. Here are some main reasons why: (not in order of importance)

    1. Rated highly by USERS on CNet
    2. Large widescreen, slim, can fit into pocket easily
    3. Maps are preloaded; updates can be done via USB with my computer
    4. SD card for my Mp3's (I bought a 4GB SD card for which will hold all of my Mp3's as well as the Garmin Travel Guide)
    5. Large buttons, excellent touchscreen, automatic rerouting, traffic receiver included (3 month subscription; $60/year afterwards), FM transmitter for Mp3 and voice directions to stereo (wireless)
    6. Excellent dock for dashboard or windshield (dashboard for me)
    7. Features like locating gas stations, etc
    8. Can save 500 favorite locations for ease of use

    There are probably other features that I haven't even tapped into, but these stuck out. I used it today while going thru the city, and it's real nice. At times it suggested routes that I would not normally take, but it just recalculated when I ignored it.

    In hindsight, even though it's the first day, I'm glad that I have a separate unit. It's larger and easier to see and I don't have to worry about the phone issue at all.
  14. ps40897's Avatar
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    #14  
    You forgot one thing. How much did you pay for it?

    I spent ~$200 for a tomtom5 and a cradle and it works just fine with my 650 and 700p. One thing you didn't ask yourself was how much you'll actually use the thing. Maybe a lot at first but I bet you only end up bringing it out every once in a while after that. The nuvi is defenitely purdy but I don't know if it's really worth the bank you laid out for it.

    Also, why on earth would you want to have an mp3 player in your gps when the ipod can be so elegantly interfaced with a car stereo? With that you get your whole music collection.

    Oh, and you'd better remember to put it in your glove box when parking otherwise it's burglar bait.

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