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  1.    #1  
    Hello,

    I work in a hospital and would love to own a smartphone with built-in paging capability. Does anyone know of any current or upcoming smartphones with this feature? 'Paging' to my number@pcs.rogers.com is not an option because there are many places within the hospital that do not have good cell phone (?) reception.

    Thanks,

    Felix
  2. #2  
    I'm not sure what frequencies your carrier operates at, but don't pager networks operate at 900MHz? So isn't it possible to implement the FLEX protocol carrier side if they already operate on the same band?


  3.    #3  
    Yes, the Rogers network operates at 900Mhz. Now, how do I "implement the FLEX protocol??" I would greatly appreciate your advice.
  4. #4  
    Well client side would be done in software. It would have to be implemented by Rogers as well. If they already run on that band, I can't imagine why they wouldn't have that capability.

    It just occured to me that pager devices may modulate their signals in a manner different than the CDMA radio in your Treo. Therefore the hardware would not be compliant with the network, should it exist. And upon further analysis, I would think the pager on the same frequency as the phone could possibly cause interference and effectively reduce the signal strength for both devices. It would be a good reason as to why paging isn't implemented on their network or in any smartphone I can think of. I'm afraid you'll have to resort to two separate devices.


  5. #5  
    Have 'em call your phone - and don't answer it! But before doing that, does your provider have a voice mail option for only paging, no voice mail? Ben
  6. #6  
    But if he doesn't have service, he can't get the little page thingy (for lack of better terminology )... right?


  7. #7  
    Bottom line is that pagers are much more reliable at receiving signals than cell phones. If you can't live with delays when you have no or weak service, get a pager.
  8. #8  
    Actually, cell phones are more 'sophisticated' at receiving pages. If you are in a 'dead' area with a pager and someone is sending you a page, you will never get it. With a cell phone, if you are in a 'dead' area and someone sends you a page, it will keep trying to send it until you get a signal on your phone. I use mine as a pager all the time. With Sprint, my voicemail just says "Hi, this is Dr. So-and-so, press 2 now to leave me a page, or wait on the line to leave a voicemail". If it rings while I'm available to answer it, I just answer it...(why wouldn't you). If I'm with a patient, I just hit one of the volume keys to silence it and have the caller leave a page or voicemail.....
  9. #9  
    Sure, the cell phone is better at receiving "pages" IF you are in a coverage area. Yes, if you are out of coverage, you will get the voicemail eventually, when you get back in the service area. However, pagers have a much broader coverage than any one cell phone company and do better in buildings and rural areas. I know in GA that that you can get a page just about anywhere in the state. Cell phones don't come close to pagers in fringe areas.
  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by wcarlson40
    With Sprint, my voicemail just says "Hi, this is Dr. So-and-so, press 2 now to leave me a page, or wait on the line to leave a voicemail". If it rings while I'm available to answer it, I just answer it...(why wouldn't you). If I'm with a patient, I just hit one of the volume keys to silence it and have the caller leave a page or voicemail.....
    Thanks for the info wcarlson40. I am a resident physician. When I am on-call, I am assigned to a call room in an area of the hospital that does not afford cell phone reception. I would love to have a smartphone that was able to receive both pager and cell phone ?frequencies. Wouldn't that be as simple as incorporating the 'pager' hardware into one of these smartphones?

    Thanks again,

    Felix
  11. #11  
    It's a little bit more complicated than that. First of all, it would reduce the signal of both radios. Two radios within one device both operating on the same frequency, the one with higher power will essentially jam the one with the lower power (it's a lot more complicated than that and it's not actually "jamming" the device, rather causing interference). This is why a unified device does not exist (to my knowledge). Not only are there hardware issues, but software as well. Unless you plan on having a service independent from your carrier, the FLEX protocol must be implemented carrier side, as I posted previously.


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