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  1.    #1  
    I was curious if Palm VNC needed a TCP/IP connection to access my home computer of if it was possible for it to work directly over the phone line. I have cable internet access and was wondering if I'd be able to dial into my computer with a modem and Palm VNC to access the internet. Any other work-arounds to getting my visor on-line (wired only as there is no coverage for any of the wireless options available in my area) would be appreciated.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  2. #2  
    Palm VNC requires TCP/IP

    You might be able to do it, I belive you can do it with some kind of internet connection sharing software (I think you can do it on Windows and I know for a fact it would work on Linux). The net result is you would have to set up your computer as a mini internet service provider that only services you. However, it might just be easier to use your Visor's modem and surf the web directly if that is what you are trying to do and forget VNC. It would be quicker and easier to forget VNC and you should still be able to access tcp/ip thru your dial up connection to your pc via the modem.

    it would work something like this:

    Visor & Modem <--- phone line ---> Modem & PC + network card & cable modem <--- catv wire----> internet

    The internet connection sharing software would act as network bridge between the network card in the PC and the modem attached as well as a DHCP & DNS server for any connections coming in from the modem (i.e. the Visor).
    Last edited by EricG; 02/21/2001 at 12:27 PM.
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by EricG
    Palm VNC requires TCP/IP

    You might be able to do it, I belive you can do it with some kind of internet connection sharing software (I think you can do it on Windows and I know for a fact it would work on Linux). The net result is you would have to set up your computer as a mini internet service provider that only services you. However, it might just be easier to use your Visor's modem and surf the web directly if that is what you are trying to do and forget VNC. It would be quicker and easier to forget VNC and you should still be able to access tcp/ip thru your dial up connection to your pc via the modem.

    it would work something like this:

    Visor & Modem <--- phone line ---> Modem & PC + network card & cable modem <--- catv wire----> internet

    The internet connection sharing software would act as network bridge between the network card in the PC and the modem attached as well as a DHCP & DNS server for any connections coming in from the modem (i.e. the Visor).
    We're talking a Mac. I'm not able to use a dial-up connection with my cable service (@Home -- they discontinued the dial-up service) and I sure don't want to pay $20 for dial-up on top of the $30 for cable just for the visor. If I don't have to use VNC that's wonderful. Memory real estate on my prism is prime. Now for the million dollar question, how would I go about using the cable connection to the internet from a visor modem dialing into my desktop? I know I can hotsync with the modem, but how do I establish a connection to the computer from my visor (that isn't a hotsync), and then how do I access the computer's network card/cable modem once I'm connected?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  4. #4  
    when I say PC*, I mean it in the generic sense of the word..

    (You Mac users are SOOOOOO touchy about words.. jello is jello even if it's isn't made by general foods.. sheeesh, Vc is becoming too Mac centric)


    I think you kinda missed what I was suggesting...

    You would still need a modem connected to your MAC (or PC*), from your visor (with a modem), you would be calling into your home computer's modem not your cable modem providers (dial in) ISP.. On your MAC (or PC*) you will need some kind of internet connection sharing software/bridge that will also answer the home computer modem when a ring is detected... Once your home computer has answered the line, the "bridge" software provides and IP address (DHCP) to the device that is calling into it and provides name to ip address resolution (DNS) service, it also accepts tcp/ip requests from the remotely connected device(a visor in your case) that is connected via the home computer's modem and routes those requests over your cable modem connection, all replies are routed from the cable modem back over the phone line via the modem on your home computer..

    This does not require a "dial up" service as YOUR computer and YOUR home phone (or at least the one the computer is connected to) will become a "dial up" service.


    You would set up your home computer (your MAC)(your home phone) phone number as an ISP connection on your visor. In most cases this will be your home phone number unless your home computer has a separate phone line. You will also need a modem for your visor, either a hardwired one or a cable for a cellphone.

    On your home computer, you will need a modem, and software to function as a DHCP & DNS server & bridge to your cable modem. (I have no idea what that software would be for a Mac, sorry, don't have one so I don't know), there are many for the Windows platform, and Linux has it built in..



    * -- PC, is a generic reference to a home computer and not and indication of a specific platform , aka Windows/Intel, Mac, Linux etc...
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by EricG
    when I say PC*, I mean it in the generic sense of the word..

    (You Mac users are SOOOOOO touchy about words.. jello is jello even if it's isn't made by general foods.. sheeesh, Vc is becoming too Mac centric)
    You made a distinction between PC and Linux, so I assumed you infered a difference between PC and Mac. Here's to us over-sensitive Mac huggers.
    I think you kinda missed what I was suggesting...

    You would still need a modem connected to your MAC (or PC*), from your visor (with a modem), you would be calling into your home computer's modem not your cable modem providers (dial in) ISP.. On your MAC (or PC*) you will need some kind of internet connection sharing software/bridge that will also answer the home computer modem when a ring is detected... Once your home computer has answered the line, the "bridge" software provides and IP address (DHCP) to the device that is calling into it and provides name to ip address resolution (DNS) service, it also accepts tcp/ip requests from the remotely connected device(a visor in your case) that is connected via the home computer's modem and routes those requests over your cable modem connection, all replies are routed from the cable modem back over the phone line via the modem on your home computer..

    This does not require a "dial up" service as YOUR computer and YOUR home phone (or at least the one the computer is connected to) will become a "dial up" service.


    You would set up your home computer (your MAC)(your home phone) phone number as an ISP connection on your visor. In most cases this will be your home phone number unless your home computer has a separate phone line. You will also need a modem for your visor, either a hardwired one or a cable for a cellphone.

    On your home computer, you will need a modem, and software to function as a DHCP & DNS server & bridge to your cable modem. (I have no idea what that software would be for a Mac, sorry, don't have one so I don't know), there are many for the Windows platform, and Linux has it built in..



    * -- PC, is a generic reference to a home computer and not and indication of a specific platform , aka Windows/Intel, Mac, Linux etc...
    No, I misread the first post and thought you were suggesting getting a dial-up connection in addition to the cable before your suggestion of using the computer as a dial-up connection. You see, I have a Mac, and as such am unable to comprehend advanced English without my computer reading it to me. When you read my posts and you see a big word it's actually the Mac. I actually only read and write at a second grade level, my Mac fleshes out my anemic (hey, it chose a good one!) sentences and ideas into ones more appropriate for civilized discourse (we play golf on datcourse).

    So to get this straight: I need to buy a modem (TM+ looks about right) and software that allows my computer to use the modem to access the network card/cable modem. Then after a boat-load of configuring I should be golden, right?
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  6. #6  
    Ok, I guess this is a generic *PC question...

    I have a hardware router connected to my cable connection and two computers (Mac's) that share it. Is there some way to use the hardware router to do the same thing as the software you mentioned? Does the fact that I already have a hardware router help at all?

    If that question is stupid please forgive me. The thing is, I'm away from my Mac at the moment and this PC (aka Winblows) doesn't discard my idiotic VC posts . On a side note, if it weren't for my Mac I'd really have 3 times the number of posts, hehe.
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  7. #7  
    I asked this exact same question in wireless forums! But no one replied

    I run Win2k with its built in internet sharing (Its all automatic, just plug a computer into the network and it has a connection). If I create an incoming connection that allows people to dial into my computer do you think this would also share internet access with the Visor?
    Matt Nichols
    VigoSpraxPalm@Yahoo.com
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson

    So to get this straight: I need to buy a modem (TM+ looks about right) and software that allows my computer to use the modem to access the network card/cable modem. Then after a boat-load of configuring I should be golden, right? [/B]
    Yup... that's pretty much about it.. the good news is that software in most cases can be had as shareware or freeware (again, you may need to check with other Mac folks on a good package name).. If the mac internet connection sharing program is written correctly all the configuration should be pretty much already done, and all you would need to do is assign a account/password for any calls that try to connect in via the modem (you don't want the whole world connecting to the net via your mac for free !!!!)... So the bulk of the hard work is pretty much already done... If I knew of a good Mac based package I'd suggest one but I don't know of any..
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Matthew Nichols
    I asked this exact same question in wireless forums! But no one replied

    I run Win2k with its built in internet sharing (Its all automatic, just plug a computer into the network and it has a connection). If I create an incoming connection that allows people to dial into my computer do you think this would also share internet access with the Visor?
    Essentially yes, but My Windows 2k experience is limited.. I think the "default" ICS program that ships with Win2k only does "network card" connected computers.. I could be wrong. Under Win98 you would need to install the "dial up connection server".
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by lennonhead
    Ok, I guess this is a generic *PC question...

    I have a hardware router connected to my cable connection and two computers (Mac's) that share it. Is there some way to use the hardware router to do the same thing as the software you mentioned? Does the fact that I already have a hardware router help at all?

    If that question is stupid please forgive me. The thing is, I'm away from my Mac at the moment and this PC (aka Winblows) doesn't discard my idiotic VC posts . On a side note, if it weren't for my Mac I'd really have 3 times the number of posts, hehe.
    Not a dumb question, the hardware router won't help much in this case (you are connecting in from the outside via a modem on your mac), you would still need to do what I described above on one of your Mac's. The router just helps keep the icky-nasties from coming in from the cablemodem/dsl connection (and allows you to split the connection between your networked systems )
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  11. #11  
    For the record, I don't hate Mac's, I just don't use one.. If someone gave me one I'd use it.. (I've used just about every other home computer out there that was ever made, except Mac's..)
    "One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’." -- Douglas Adams
  12. #12  
    Win2K ICQ will work fine.

    You need to set up RAS (Remote Access service) to allow your visor to dial up and connect to your local lan.
  13. MPM
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    #13  
    Originally posted by ****-richardson
    <snip>...So to get this straight: I need to buy a modem (TM+ looks about right) and software that allows my computer to use the modem to access the network card/cable modem. Then after a boat-load of configuring I should be golden, right?
    I think that Mac OS 9 has the needed software built in. Starting with Mac OS 9, Apple Remote Access has the ability to set up a remote dial-in link. The link uses PPP (just like dialing into your ISP) and shares your Mac's IP address. Try looking through your on-screen help (Apple Guide). I think that bringing up the Remote Access Control Panel and clicking on the round question mark icon in the lower left of the window get's you the proper help screens. I'm writting all of this from memory because I'm at work right now on a Windoze (gag!) machine, so I could have gotten a few things wrong.

    I've been wanting to do the same thing with my Visor, Mac, and my DSL line, but I haven't had time yet to try it out. I might try to set this up over the weekend, since I don't like to publicly state that something will work when I haven't yet tried it myself!

    Hope this helps.
  14.    #14  
    Originally posted by MPM
    I think that Mac OS 9 has the needed software built in. Starting with Mac OS 9, Apple Remote Access has the ability to set up a remote dial-in link. The link uses PPP (just like dialing into your ISP) and shares your Mac's IP address. Try looking through your on-screen help (Apple Guide). I think that bringing up the Remote Access Control Panel and clicking on the round question mark icon in the lower left of the window get's you the proper help screens. I'm writting all of this from memory because I'm at work right now on a Windoze (gag!) machine, so I could have gotten a few things wrong.

    I've been wanting to do the same thing with my Visor, Mac, and my DSL line, but I haven't had time yet to try it out. I might try to set this up over the weekend, since I don't like to publicly state that something will work when I haven't yet tried it myself!

    Hope this helps.
    I'll be giving this a shot as soon as finances permit. It looks right. Thanks!
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.
  15. #15  
    Post your results back! I'd be very interested in hearing if it works.
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  16.    #16  
    Originally posted by lennonhead
    Post your results back! I'd be very interested in hearing if it works.
    My results won't get very far if I don't figure out how to get the computer to answer the phone after 5 rings. I need to be able to call in and disable my answering machine and then call in with the visor. I had my wife call the house after I thought I had it figured out, but it still answered after the first ring. She wasn't happy having the phone being answered with the sound of a cat trapped under the hood of a car at 300dB. Guess I should've told her that might happen.
    -Joshua
    I've decided to become enigmatic.

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