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  1.    #1  
    Hi folks,

    I use my SMS messaging as a beeper both for callback numbers as well as messages about medical patient calls overnight from our phone answering service (i.e. "Sara Smith calling about 5 y.o. son Jason complaining of ear pain and fever, please call at 555-1234").

    My SMS messaging alert sound is always on (I am on call basically all the time for certain patient care issues). I have never had a problem with spam e-mails on my SMS messaging until the last 2 days. I got a SMS message at midnight last night offering Viagra, and another such message today offering something else (ironic, since I can prescribe any medication if I so foolishly chose).

    I have NEVER posted my SMS messaging e-mail address anywhere. In fact, I don't even know it off the top of my head and I'd have to look it up. I must continue to use the functionality of SMS as my beeper.

    Any solutions for this? My carrier is Cingular, by the way.

    -- Josh (Dr. Josh, obviously)
    Last edited by steinbej; 06/28/2006 at 11:56 AM.
  2. #2  
    I am with sprint and am getting quite a few. I just delete them.
    Would also like to know what can be done.
  3. #3  
    Hey Doc! You might want to try calling your cingular tech support on this one. I don't know of a "block" feature on the text side or phone side. Last resort, call the number that is calling you and tell them to remove your name from their list.
  4.    #4  
    It's not a number that is "calling" me, instead it's a spam e-mailer sending me spam to my SMS via e-mail. The e-mail addresses of such spam are always a bunch of garbled obviously bogus letters such as "zxxcvvbnn@candynet.com". The sender is always different name and different domain. So I can't call anyone back and tell 'em to take my name off their list.

    I get 100 spam e-mails a day in my regular e-mail, but I have a spam filter and don't care. Writing them back asking not to be spammed never helps. In fact, writing back verifies your existence and only encourages more spam.

    So I still need help on this issue of SMS Spam.
    -- Josh
  5. #5  
    Don't know about Cingular (or any other US carrier, for that matter), but north of the 49th, all someone has to know is your cell number.

    To reach any Rogers cell customer, all you need to do is key in their 10 digit phone number, followed by the email to SMS gateway domain (e.g.: 1234567890-at-somegateway-dot-rogers-dot-ca -- left deliberately wrong, to prevent Rogers users from getting crap from a lazy spammer). Same thing for Bell (and I assume Telus and Fido). If you don't know the exchanges that are currently assigned to the various cell companies, a quick reverse lookup gives them the info they need.

    I would assume that there is a similar system in place for each US cell provider. The tricky thing is that with number portability, it requires a little more homework to figure out what gateway/domain to use, but it's hardly rocket surgery. If you cell number is published anywhere, it's possible that someone put you on a list, or maybe some spambot noticed that a message sent to your number@domain wasn't returned. Hopefully for you Cingular has some kind of anti-spam policy and can help you stem the tide before it gets out of hand.
  6. #6  
    Is it possible that your number is somewhere on the internet? It is possible to tell who your carrier is usually by the second three digits of your ten digit number. It is possible that someone wrote a rather intuitive piece of ratware which can extract your carrier from your number and generate the rest of it based on that...


  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenCode
    Is it possible that your number is somewhere on the internet? ...

    I'm sure I have never put it there and I doubt it is on the web in any fashion. I don't even know my SMS e-mail address, actually, since I never use it to message myself! It's some combination of phonenumber@cingulair.something, but I have to look it up if I really need to know.

    -- Josh
  8. #8  
    I'm with Cingular and have also received a couple of bogus SMSs the last two days. I did a reply to the last one, said "your message is not coming through, remove me from your list".
    Nothing since then.
  9.    #9  
    I just got this from my Cingular business sales account representative. As you will see, I did not get the helpful answer I was looking for. The rep's message is here:

    "Josh,
    You're between a rock and a hard spot on this one, as 'someone' out
    there has your cell number, and is now sending you advertising. Check
    the advertisement, and see if there is a call-back number. Call that
    number and threaten legal action if they continue to send you
    spam/advertising.

    The only other option is to remove the SMS code, which you need.

    I, too, am having some of this problem, as it seems that 'someone' has
    my number after completing a business medical survey.

    The call to threaten legal action seems to have the best response.

    Good luck on this one!



    ...... ..........., Business Care Manager, Cingular Wireless, Corporate
    Markets Group
    (o) 315-439-5112
    (c) 315-243-0621"
  10. Dim-Ize's Avatar
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    #10  
    Some ISP's allow for email forwarding.

    Have you by chance turned on your email account to forward to your SMS?

    If so, it is possible that the SMS Spam you are seeing - is actually an email directed to your inbox email account and is being forwarded automatically.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dim-Ize
    Some ISP's allow for email forwarding.

    Have you by chance turned on your email account to forward to your SMS?

    If so, it is possible that the SMS Spam you are seeing - is actually an email directed to your inbox email account and is being forwarded automatically.
    Somehow, I doubt that, as SMS has a fixed character length, whereas email spam tends to be either:

    1) verbose
    2) in non-text format (usually HTML)
    3) an inline graphic (extension of the HTML messaging format)

    All 3 of these tendencies would prevent the spam from being received as SMS.
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by hotbranch
    Somehow, I doubt that, as SMS has a fixed character length, whereas email spam tends to be either:

    1) verbose
    2) in non-text format (usually HTML)
    3) an inline graphic (extension of the HTML messaging format)

    All 3 of these tendencies would prevent the spam from being received as SMS.
    Correct, and I have not turned on any e-mail to be forwarded to SMS.
    -- Josh
  13. #13  
    Treo Helper (and some other apps) can flag a message and take an action. You could set filters to delete messages upon receipt, or only keep messages from your service or from a 10 digit number.

    Not an ideal solution, but if you only use SMS in that limited way, this work-around may serve you well.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by shopharim
    Treo Helper (and some other apps) can flag a message and take an action. You could set filters to delete messages upon receipt, or only keep messages from your service or from a 10 digit number.

    Not an ideal solution, but if you only use SMS in that limited way, this work-around may serve you well.
    Really? I thought programs filtered just e-mail, not SMS messages. A filter might be helpful. Although the way those spammers make ever-changing bogus e-mail names and domains, filters would have a tough time catching spam.

    Do you have a link for a program?
    -- Josh
  15. #15  
    I used to get 2-3 a day and I called Cingular and they told me that they were working on a way to filter it and would put it on my service as soon as possible.. Perhaps a month later it stopped and I've only received 1 or 2 in the last year since probably.

    I'm not sure what you'd ask them, except maybe just call back a few times until you get a knowledgeable CSR.

    I went from needing 50sms to 200sms to avoid overage, but after I complained about it a few times they started taking off the extra money for the 200sms monthly as I called. I guess it was 3-4 months before I got the information on filtering being worked on.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by steinbej
    Hi folks,

    I use my SMS messaging as a beeper both for callback numbers as well as messages about medical patient calls overnight from our phone answering service (i.e. "Sara Smith calling about 5 y.o. son Jason complaining of ear pain and fever, please call at 555-1234").

    My SMS messaging alert sound is always on (I am on call basically all the time for certain patient care issues). I have never had a problem with spam e-mails on my SMS messaging until the last 2 days. I got a SMS message at midnight last night offering Viagra, and another such message today offering something else (ironic, since I can prescribe any medication if I so foolishly chose).

    I have NEVER posted my SMS messaging e-mail address anywhere. In fact, I don't even know it off the top of my head and I'd have to look it up. I must continue to use the functionality of SMS as my beeper.

    Any solutions for this? My carrier is Cingular, by the way.

    -- Josh (Dr. Josh, obviously)
    SMS spam is becomming an increasing concern for cellular customers. Solution one is to try typing "STOP" no quotes then the 4 or 5 digit short code listed in the sms message which identifies the company. Send the message out and you should receive a reply from the third party mail server confirming unsubscribing your wireless number from their mailing list. If you've accidentally deleted the message or are having difficulty finding the company with the short code then request further details from your carrier customer care representitive (Rogers customers dial *611 from your device). Most carriers will not charge for a telephone number change if they can verify there is spam or harrassing calls on the customers line. For companies that refuse to unsubscribe you from their mailing list I suggest seeking legal assistance and also for Canadian customers (Rogers, Fido, Bell, Telus) filing a complaint with the http://www.crtc.gc.ca/ Another solution is to use third party software such as http://www.mantragroup.com/products/palm/callshield/ which helps filter unwanted calls and sms to your Treo,

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