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  1. #21  
    get a protective case you cry baby. 20$ protects your 650$.
  2. #22  
    Don't feed the cats.
  3. #23  
    i dropped my 600 all the time....a ding here and there. i dropped my 650 a couple of times...and man, that thing is weak. one time i dropped it and the entire back looked like a chewed up pencil. strength wise...i think the 600 is the strongest. the 700p feels real fragile.
  4. #24  
    I've dropped my Treo 600 a few times and it's always survived just fine -- once even from three feet onto asphalt! Hope I have as good of luck with my 700p (which is on the way).
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    #25  
    One thing I forgot to mention: When I dropped my 700P and lost my speaker functionality (temporarily), although it didn't get a scratch on it, the antennea 'cap' popped off. That never happened with any of my other Treos. Something else to worry about.
  6. #26  
    They don't want to make sturdy phones. That's bad for business. If your phones last forever, then they don't make as much money off of repairs/insurance claims. It may sound like a horrible thing to do, but pretty much all companies (with the exception of a few that use their sturdiness as a selling point) make breakable stuff these days. I remember when the Apple PowerBooks were made from Kevlar. I dropped that thing so many times it isn't even funny. Never even got a strach on it. My Ti PowerBook is a totally different story. The thing fell about a foot and a half and the case was all misshapen and the screen was left in less than perfect condition (i.e. it flickers), as well as a lot of other damage that I won't go into (if I named all the individual parts, we'd have a novel here). The point is, companies want you to break your stuff. They glady make their products thinner, as per request of the cosumer market. Thinner products mean less stable products, which means more broken products. That, my friends, equals more business.

    And now:
    My 700P will be better than your 700p!

    Signed,
    The n00b!

    P.s. Bow before me!

    Don't just see the n00b, be the n00b! Wait, no...
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by OnceUponAn00b
    They don't want to make sturdy phones. That's bad for business. If your phones last forever, then they don't make as much money off of repairs/insurance claims. It may sound like a horrible thing to do, but pretty much all companies (with the exception of a few that use their sturdiness as a selling point) make breakable stuff these days.
    Maybe there's a market for rough and tumble smartphones. The type you could use in battle or under water. I'd buy it.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by TreoInCollege
    Maybe there's a market for rough and tumble smartphones. The type you could use in battle or under water. I'd buy it.
    Nextel has them and they are fugly. Buy away.
    Freedom of some speech in the US, through someone in the UK.
  9. #29  
    the fact that the case is plastic helps protect the shock better than a metal case because some of the shock will be absorbed. I'm sure companies can make durable smartphones, but they would need to be very big (to provide a shock buffer for components) and fairly light to decrease shock. So, unless we are willing to give up features to reduce weight or carry brick phones, i think this will be the state of pda phones until components can be made smaller.
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