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  1.    #1  
    Thinking about switching from 650 to 700p, but I would like to know exactly what is the differences between bluetooth v1.1 and v1.2. I am just trying to justify spending the extra money.
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  4. #4  
    From:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth#Bluetooth_1.1

    Bluetooth 1.2

    This version is backwards compatible with 1.1 and the major enhancements include

    * Adaptive Frequency-hopping spread spectrum (AFH), which improves resistance to radio frequency interference by avoiding using crowded frequencies in the hopping sequence
    * Higher transmission speeds in practice
    * extended Synchronous Connections (eSCO), which improves voice quality of audio links by allowing retransmissions of corrupted packets.
    * Host Controller Interface (HCI) support for 3-wire UART
    * HCI access to timing information for Bluetooth applications.


    It seems in principle that Bluetooth 1.2 should resulting in longer range-of-operation, given its use of frequency-hopping. I'd like to have longer range (mostly for use with the Salling Clicker application), so this is one of the many things which makes the 700p attractive to me.


    BTW, I have never understood whether Softick Audio Gateway (SAG) is coercing the 650's hardware into following the Bluetooth 1.2 protocol, or whether it implements A2DP over Bluetooth 1.1. I had read on this list that Bluetooth 1.2 is a prerequisitite for A2DP. Does anyone know?
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by jae_63
    BTW, I have never understood whether Softick Audio Gateway (SAG) is coercing the 650's hardware into following the Bluetooth 1.2 protocol, or whether it implements A2DP over Bluetooth 1.1. I had read on this list that Bluetooth 1.2 is a prerequisitite for A2DP. Does anyone know?
    No, SAG could not do this. The most important features you describe, such as AFH, are implemented in the radio hardware and not in the Palm OS Bluetooth stack. SAG simply implements the A2DP profile and related protocols that run perfectly fine over 1.1 or 1.2 (and later) Bluetooth stacks/radios.

    As you stated, AFH helps a lot to eliminate interference and perhaps extend the range, making for a much better user experience when listening to stereo audio. In other words a 1.2 stack should make SAG even better.
    The wise man breaks wind and is gone... - J. Tull
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by paesano
    No, SAG could not do this. The most important features you describe, such as AFH, are implemented in the radio hardware and not in the Palm OS Bluetooth stack. SAG simply implements the A2DP profile and related protocols that run perfectly fine over 1.1 or 1.2 (and later) Bluetooth stacks/radios.

    But rumor has it that the radio hardware does support Bluetooth 1.2:
    http://discussion.treocentral.com/sh...=broadcom+2035


    So depending upon how all the software is organized, it's possible in principle that SAG has inserted their own software which uses the chip's Bluetooth 1.2 capabilities. Unlikely in my opinion, but possible.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by jae_63
    But rumor has it that the radio hardware does support Bluetooth 1.2:
    http://discussion.treocentral.com/sh...=broadcom+2035


    So depending upon how all the software is organized, it's possible in principle that SAG has inserted their own software which uses the chip's Bluetooth 1.2 capabilities. Unlikely in my opinion, but possible.
    Yes, this is true. The 2035 can support 1.2, most likely through a firmware updated to the radio (not sure if any 1.2 features are included in the Treo's radio). But since A2DP doesn't need a 1.2 radio to work, I seriously doubt that Softick would go to the trouble of "upgrading" the Bluetooth radio to enable A2DP.
    The wise man breaks wind and is gone... - J. Tull

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