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  1.    #1  
    I just got my Tom Tom 5 last week.. So far I am 4 for 4 in places it INCORRECTLY placed on the map.


    Hotel in Daytona - Miles past it.
    Hotel in Lauderdale - Make a left instead of a right to get to it.
    Business in Lauderdale - Drive into a Neighborhood
    Highschool in Stuart (over 10 years old) NOT ON MAP!

    So.. if I get a downloaded map of say... Daytona.. Will I have a more accurate map than what is on CD? Are there OTHER maps I can use with TOM TOM?

    I really love TT but I cannot rely on it till the maps prove themselves to be reliable..
  2. #2  
    I just got mine yesterday and I'm having the same problem. Our subdivision in Raleigh, NC, has over 1,000 homes. Most of these have been up for anywhere from two to five years, and yet the entire area shows up on the map as some kind of barren wasteland with no roads.

    Also, the address of the airport parking lot I use, which has been there for at least ten years is rejected as being invalid. And the system gave me a very roundabout way to get there from my house - essentially directing me to go one exit beyond where I normally get off the highway and then go in the reverse direction to get to my destination.

    It puts my old house one block off of where it actually is, and shows me driving off the road when I'm clearly on pavement on roads it does recognize. A three-year-old strip mall with a Target and Home Depot doesn't exist according to their maps.

    Obviously, with all the new construction going on around us here, I don't expect that the maps will be current. But three years? That certainly seems long enough to make it onto the CDs...

    Is anyone else having these problems?

    Also, does anyone know how to use contacts from the address book when specifying locations in TomTom?

    Thanks!
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by qualtalk
    I just got mine yesterday and I'm having the same problem. Our subdivision in Raleigh, NC, has over 1,000 homes. Most of these have been up for anywhere from two to five years, and yet the entire area shows up on the map as some kind of barren wasteland with no roads.

    Also, the address of the airport parking lot I use, which has been there for at least ten years is rejected as being invalid. And the system gave me a very roundabout way to get there from my house - essentially directing me to go one exit beyond where I normally get off the highway and then go in the reverse direction to get to my destination.

    It puts my old house one block off of where it actually is, and shows me driving off the road when I'm clearly on pavement on roads it does recognize. A three-year-old strip mall with a Target and Home Depot doesn't exist according to their maps.

    Obviously, with all the new construction going on around us here, I don't expect that the maps will be current. But three years? That certainly seems long enough to make it onto the CDs...

    Is anyone else having these problems?

    Also, does anyone know how to use contacts from the address book when specifying locations in TomTom?

    Thanks!
    I hear there is going to be a big map update shortly.. I cant wait...

    For the COntacts... it's simple.. Go into the icon that is created for the Tom TOm Contacts.. Go to the contact. (click the options button and select navagate to..)

    Tip... You cannot have a Suite Number in the address or it won't work.. Just a plain Street name and number and city...
  4. #4  
    TT5 maps are still 2002 version, at least 2 years later than mapopolis (Q3 2004).
    Treo 750 unbranded T-mobile, HTC WIZARD 8125 T-MOBILE (broken), Treo 650 T-mobile 1.43/1.14 OS 5.4.8 Garnet (sold).
    Dell X50v, X30 624Mhz and HP ipaq h2210 h1945.

    Treo 750 hacks thread.
  5. #5  
    My subdivision in Tampa is only 3 years old and it shows on TT5. I haven't had any major routing problems yet, and I've found things in several states thus far.
    Highly Mobile iPhone User

    Palm Pilot -> Palm Pilot Pro -> HP 620LX -> Palm VII -> Palm VIIx -> Ipaq 3270 -> Treo 300 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> Treo 700p - iPhone - iPhone 3G
  6. #6  
    I'm in Gainesville and just got TomTom last night. I entered in an address for a local restaurant, and it tried to send me all over the place on some wierd, circuitious route. Then I tried to navigate home from there, same thing. It would have gotten me there I suppose, but the way it tried to send me was just bizarre-taking big loops and stuff. I'm going to tinker with it today some more, but I hope this isn't indicative of how it works in FL.
  7. #7  
    There is a stretch of interstate 288 just outside of Richmond, VA that was opened almost a year ago. This stretch of interstate cuts much city-driving out between certain points. Even though it's been a year, maps.google.com and Tomtom both do not show it. I find it infuriating.

    I did not realize that Tomtom went back to 2002. That's really bad. I dare not use it driving up to DC, the mixing bowl is radically different now
  8. Jeff Donald's Avatar
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    #8  
    I've been using TT in Florida for over a year and there are some 10 year old roads that aren't on the maps. A map update is definitely needed. However, the major market for their product is Western Europe and they get the majority of TT's attention. In answer to the original question, the downloaded maps are the same as the CD's, at least in the 4 that I've bought (Clearwater, Miami, Orlando, Atlanta).
  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Donald
    I've been using TT in Florida for over a year and there are some 10 year old roads that aren't on the maps. A map update is definitely needed. However, the major market for their product is Western Europe and they get the majority of TT's attention. In answer to the original question, the downloaded maps are the same as the CD's, at least in the 4 that I've bought (Clearwater, Miami, Orlando, Atlanta).
    Thanks for the clarification... So I understand there is no benefit to downloading at this point...

    I really hope the lasted maps that are supposed to come out in mid year happen sooner..

    Also the convoluted algorithm they use is rediculous! There should be a routing option that uses the LEAST NUMBER of TURNS! That typically gives the shortest AND fastest route...

    Also I'd like to run through trial routes without having to have the GPS connected...
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Donald
    I've been using TT in Florida for over a year and there are some 10 year old roads that aren't on the maps. A map update is definitely needed. However, the major market for their product is Western Europe and they get the majority of TT's attention. In answer to the original question, the downloaded maps are the same as the CD's, at least in the 4 that I've bought (Clearwater, Miami, Orlando, Atlanta).
    TT get sits map from a 3rd party.

    "In order to obtain the correct map data, TomTom and its map supplier, TeleAtlas, rely on local government and other local organizations across the Europe and the US to supply us with the correct, relevant and most up to date information for millions of highways and roads. Of the major digital map data suppliers there are two in the world that have good map data for the US and Europe, one of them being TeleAtlas. On average, a small percentage of all roads are changed; our map supplier has hundreds of people driving through the US and Europe and analyzing satellite images to register these changes. This process is time consuming and a logistical challenge. This is also the case for review of all errors TomTom customers submit via our website. These errors are passed on to our digital map supplier, TeleAtlas, whose personnel will then in many cases, survey the location on the ground to analyze and register different situations. Digital map data is a rapidly growing market. Along with regular changes to existing road infrastructure thousands of miles of new roads are added every year. Still the coverage of the map data, in almost all western European countries and the US, is more than 99%. Exceptions are possible, but the digital map data TomTom is using at present is the best data available on the market. Next to having the best map data it is also the latest map data available. Our map data has a version number and a release date, the date represents the time when the analysis of the roads freezes and TeleAtlas starts the compilation and publishing processes the updated map data. When the updated data is published and delivered TomTom starts the compression process in order to fit the map data on a reasonable size memory card. This production process takes time and therefore the release dates of TomTom map products are slightly off from the release dates of the original TeleAtlas map data."
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    TT get sits map from a 3rd party.

    "In order to obtain the correct map data, TomTom and its map supplier, TeleAtlas, rely on local government and other local organizations across the Europe and the US to supply us with the correct, relevant and most up to date information for millions of highways and roads. Of the major digital map data suppliers there are two in the world that have good map data for the US and Europe, one of them being TeleAtlas. On average, a small percentage of all roads are changed; our map supplier has hundreds of people driving through the US and Europe and analyzing satellite images to register these changes. This process is time consuming and a logistical challenge. This is also the case for review of all errors TomTom customers submit via our website. These errors are passed on to our digital map supplier, TeleAtlas, whose personnel will then in many cases, survey the location on the ground to analyze and register different situations. Digital map data is a rapidly growing market. Along with regular changes to existing road infrastructure thousands of miles of new roads are added every year. Still the coverage of the map data, in almost all western European countries and the US, is more than 99%. Exceptions are possible, but the digital map data TomTom is using at present is the best data available on the market. Next to having the best map data it is also the latest map data available. Our map data has a version number and a release date, the date represents the time when the analysis of the roads freezes and TeleAtlas starts the compilation and publishing processes the updated map data. When the updated data is published and delivered TomTom starts the compression process in order to fit the map data on a reasonable size memory card. This production process takes time and therefore the release dates of TomTom map products are slightly off from the release dates of the original TeleAtlas map data."

    Great info... So how do I know how old the maps are that TT is using on my Treo?? Any confirmation that the maps are getting an update within the next few months? Also I hear they changed map suppliers to the OTHER one..is this true?
  12. #12  
    our map supplier has hundreds of people driving through the US and Europe and analyzing satellite images to register these changes.
    Hmmmmm... Why don't they create a web site, and let their registered customers "hint" them about all changes. That would be a lot more than a few hundred drivers ...

    When I see a one-way road that's in the opposite direction on the map, I would love to be able to go to this site, and tell them this has changed.

    After a few different users told them about the same change, they could just have one of their nearest official driver check it, or contact the city town hall to be sure, and make the change.

    And if they find a way to reward customers that "hinted" many good changes (such as next map version is free for you), they would get a 99% good map in less than a year.

    That's my 2 euro cents !

    stipus
    Last edited by stipus; 02/12/2006 at 05:28 PM.
  13. #13  
    I'm sorry but I think they're fluffing and exaggeration. Interstate 288 in Richmond is the interstate I referred to earlier. It's a major change to traffic flow and has been around for a year. To not have it is evidence that these people in their little cars driving around are not nearly plentiful enough.
  14. #14  
    The US has over 4 million miles of roadway. So if we say that the outfit has 200 peeps checking worldwide, say 65 in US. They would have to average 6 hours of driving per day averaging 40 mph to cover all these roads. More likely they are regular peeps doing this part time in certain areas and only on major highways and they rely on data provided by local governments for local roadways. Like the old computer axiom, "garbage in, garbage out", unless the local cities and towns, city and state DOT's are providing updated info, ths stuff is not gonna make it into anything..
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by stipus
    Hmmmmm... Why don't they create a web site, and let their registered customers "hint" them about all changes. That would be a lot more than a few hundred drivers ...

    <snip>

    stipus
    You can log map errors at www.tomtom.com after you log in.

    Thank you for taking time to report your comments on the map data of your TomTom product. TomTom has set up this special form to capture your comments and be able to prioritize your feedback so that we can track it closely.

    This form is reserved for reporting errors on the maps (e.g. missing streets, wrong driving instructions, wrong one-way streets etc.) To allow us to analyze and solve any problem that you may encounter, we need your answers to the following questions. For any other questions and information about TomTom software, please click here.

    TomTom aims to provide you with the most current and highest quality maps available in North America, Europe and Australia and your feedback is one important part in meeting that goal.
  16. ssrjazz's Avatar
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    #16  
    These maps take a lot of time to update. For every road you see on those maps, someone has been in a car with a gps driving that road. Then that data has to be uploaded/converted/merged with the master maps. Then TOMTOM takes that and makes TomTom navigator format maps from those.

    That's not including the time some poor GIS schmuck spends correcting errors on the map from the import processes.

    With the growth in a lot of communities, it's amazing they aren't further behind in as far as map updates go.
  17. ssrjazz's Avatar
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    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by TUnit
    I'm in Gainesville and just got TomTom last night. I entered in an address for a local restaurant, and it tried to send me all over the place on some wierd, circuitious route. Then I tried to navigate home from there, same thing. It would have gotten me there I suppose, but the way it tried to send me was just bizarre-taking big loops and stuff. I'm going to tinker with it today some more, but I hope this isn't indicative of how it works in FL.
    It usually tries to base a trip based on 'fastest route' Which isn't necessarily the fastest, but the roads with a higher speed limit. Might want to have it try an alternate route of 'shortest distance.'
  18. #18  
    I understand it taking a long time to confirm locations. What I have a problems with is that my wife's car GPS system supposedly gets their maps from the same company as TomTom. My wife's GPS is more reliable in our area than TomTom. I'm not talking about just new streets. But,about the Interstate that runs though and has for who knows how long. TomTom repeatedly wants me to go down a one-way on the access roads. They have been one-way access roads for at least as long as I have lived here, nearly 30 years.

    I have always been able to get to a location using TomTom. I may have to keep going when I see a route simply won't work and let TomTom recalculate.

    It's seem strange that if they get their maps from the same source they should be about the same.
  19.    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    The US has over 4 million miles of roadway. So if we say that the outfit has 200 peeps checking worldwide, say 65 in US. They would have to average 6 hours of driving per day averaging 40 mph to cover all these roads. More likely they are regular peeps doing this part time in certain areas and only on major highways and they rely on data provided by local governments for local roadways. Like the old computer axiom, "garbage in, garbage out", unless the local cities and towns, city and state DOT's are providing updated info, ths stuff is not gonna make it into anything..

    The Problem is not the NEW info.. It's not getting the OLD info correct... If Mapquest online can get the map correct and Tom Tom gets it wrong.. That tells me the map is not current from Tom Tom..

    I mean seriously.. MApping is their only business.. As soon as there is a map update from either of the (ONLY 2 MAPPERS).. then make an update available online to your users.... How hard is that? If MAPPOINT and MAPQUEST and all the other online services can keep updated then certainly a GPS Vendor can...

    From what I am gathering... The maps on TOm Tom are OVER 2 years old.. WTF!
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by blackvette
    As soon as there is a map update from either of the (ONLY 2 MAPPERS).. then make an update available online to your users
    Considering the enormity of the task at hand, taking in reported errors, verifying them and making new db files, I would expect that they only release new versions every 18 - 36 months. If they did it more often, you wouldn't be able to afford it.
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