Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1.    #1  
    Can't find it in the soft kybd. Or is my vision that clouded?
  2. naivete's Avatar
    Posts
    636 Posts
    Global Posts
    640 Global Posts
    #2  
    I don't know how to type it, but you can probably copy and paste the symbol from an ascii chart app.
  3. #3  
    Type p then alt then scroll down to pi.
  4. naivete's Avatar
    Posts
    636 Posts
    Global Posts
    640 Global Posts
    #4  
    Thanks for sharing.
  5. tripm's Avatar
    Posts
    41 Posts
    Global Posts
    48 Global Posts
    #5  
    all I get is percent or paragraph, but no pi
  6. #6  
    I do not see a true pi symbol in the keyboard help library (menu, edit in any app you can type in), so I guess all we have is the paragraph symbol or a double capital t (TT).

    Cheers, Perry.
  7. naivete's Avatar
    Posts
    636 Posts
    Global Posts
    640 Global Posts
    #7  
    I guess we're back to the ascii chart possibility. Try this and see if you can find the pi symbol.
  8. #8  
    An electronic computer had calculated it to 100,000 digits. It would have taken a person working without error eight hours a day on a desk calculator 30,000 years to make this calculation; it took the computer eight hours. Although it has now been calculated to more than 200,000,000,000 digits, the exact value pi of cannot be computed.
  9. #9  
    Interesting. . .If I type p then alt, I get a menu with the following 3 options; p, %, "pi". I am using 1.13 ROW software. Can anyone else confirm or deny this on their treo and what software versions they are using?
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by CraniumFunk
    Interesting. . .If I type p then alt, I get a menu with the following 3 options; p, %, "pi". I am using 1.13 ROW software. Can anyone else confirm or deny this on their treo and what software versions they are using?
    fyi, that's not the symbol for pi that you see...it is a pilcrow.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilcrow
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by gpco
    fyi, that's not the symbol for pi that you see...it is a pilcrow.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilcrow
    Yep, me too.
    Unlocked/Unbranded GSM Treo 650
    1.71/1.30 ENA, HW A
    T-Mobile Total Internet
  12. #12  
    Here's something else that makes no sense: 3 <alt> gives an option for the fraction 1/3, but 2<alt> does *not* give an option for 1/2. Duh.

    Treo 650 - Cingular GSM
    Software:Treo650-1.20-ENA
    Firmware:01.71
  13. #13  
    1 <alt> gives 1/4 and 1/2

    I guess they had to spread the options out. . . . .

    Cheers, Perry.
    Last edited by gtwo; 12/20/2005 at 10:32 AM.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by gpco
    fyi, that's not the symbol for pi that you see...it is a pilcrow.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilcrow
    Thanks for the clarification. So it seems there is no built-in support for Greek special characters. Looking at e alt, there are many options for an accented e. Likely, these are present because of the additional languages available in the software. So theoretically, we could have Greek special chars if Greek was an embedded language.
  15. tmt
    tmt is offline
    tmt's Avatar
    Posts
    84 Posts
    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by CraniumFunk
    Thanks for the clarification. So it seems there is no built-in support for Greek special characters.
    Well, there are a few Greek characters, there's mu (0xb5), beta (0xdf). But basically, the EFIGS Palm implements Windows codepage 1252, which is a slightly extended ISO Latin-1, plus a few special characters like the graffiti stroke, ellipsis, etc.

    A very useful and simple app to see the characters available on a given Palm (they're different depending on what language is selected) is CharSet, available at http://world.std.com/~olorin/pilot/. An oldie but goodie.
  16.    #16  
    I feel deprived. Think I'm gonna eat a pie.
  17. naivete's Avatar
    Posts
    636 Posts
    Global Posts
    640 Global Posts
    #17  
    I found these two posts over at the iSilo forum:

    For those who are interested, here's how I did it. Please note that it's kind of a hack and the HTML required to accomplish it "aint pretty". But it does work (at least in my environment) and the presentation does looks pretty nice.

    1) Install FontBucket and use it to create the Windows "Symbol" font on the
    PDA. iSiloX does not seem to support the Symbol font, but FontBucket does.

    2) Create an HTML document with the following BODY tag attribute:

    <BODY style="font-family:san-serif">
    ...the HTML for your document body goes here...
    </BODY>

    This sets "sans-serif" as the default generic font for the whole document. (I think this is already the default for HTML bodies, but I like to make it explicit.)

    3) Fill up the body of your document with any textual information you like.

    4) When you want to add Symbol font characters (math symbols or greek letters) to the body of the document, first determine the numerical character code of the character. You can do this with the Character Map utility in Windows.

    Display the Symbol font, click on the character, and Character Map will tell you the hex character code. For example, the character code for small pi is
    "0x70" (decimal 112) and for the square root sign is "0xD6" or (decimal 214).

    5) Use the following HTML tag to display that Symbol font character:

    <SPAN style="font-family:Symbol,serif">
    ...symbol font character code(s)...
    </SPAN>

    Here are some examples of various ways to display greek pi and the square root:

    <SPAN style="font-family:Symbol,serif">&#x70;</SPAN> <!-- small pi -->
    <SPAN style="font-family:Symbol,serif">p</SPAN> <!-- small pi -->
    <SPAN style="font-family:Symbol,serif">p</SPAN> <!-- small pi -->
    <SPAN style="font-family:Symbol,serif">&#xD6;</SPAN> <!-- radical -->
    <SPAN style="font-family:Symbol,serif">÷</SPAN> <!-- radical -->

    This HTML tag does a font switch and displays the enclosed character cod(s) in the named font. "Symbol,serif" says first try to display the character in a font named "Symbol" and then if that doesn't work, try using the generic font named "serif". On windows, the Symbol font is used to display the character.

    6) Use iSiloX to move the document to your PDA.

    7) Finally, open the document with iSilo and open the "Font Options" dialog (Tap "Options" then tap "Font"). For the "Sans Serif" font family, select any normal font of your choosing. (I usually choose "Device font".) For "Serif" font family, choose "{fb}Symbol:FontBucketDB". This tells iSilo to use the FontBucket font named "Symbol" (which you created in step 1) when displaying characters from the serif family.

    The document now displays both normal text and math/greek characters in iSilo.

    Enjoy.
    Last edited by naivete; 12/20/2005 at 02:53 PM.
  18. naivete's Avatar
    Posts
    636 Posts
    Global Posts
    640 Global Posts
    #18  
    Here's another way:

    In my attempts to display the symbols ↑↓→←♀♂, Greek letters and other medical characters on web pages and iSilo, I found another way of displaying Greek symbols, which should work for most other languages.



    FIRST Ė set up your Web Page
    For Greek to show up, insert this into your web page after your html tag-

    <meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=Windows-1253">

    This sets your character set to Greek.

    Here are some others-
    Windows-1250 (Central Europe)
    Windows-1251 (Cyrillic)
    Windows-1252 (Latin I)
    Windows-1253 (Greek)
    Windows-1254 (Turkish)
    Windows-1255 (Hebrew)
    Windows-1256 (Arabic)
    Windows-1257 (Baltic)
    Windows-1258 (Vietnam)
    Windows-874 (Thai)

    And hereís a link if you want to view whatís on them - http://www.microsoft.com/globaldev/reference/wincp.mspx

    UTF-8 works great for iSilo Windows but not iSilo Palm

    *Note- when writing your web page you must use the Unicode characters for them to display on iSilo. i.e. Ė Symbol Fonts wonít work; only use the Characters under Times New Roman, Arial, ect.

    Save
    Convert
    Install


    SECOND- set up your font
    For iSilo Windows users-
    You should be all set, just select a font such as Times New Roman or Arial.

    For iSilo Palm folks-
    Use Font Bucket to make a new font.
    Click add Font
    Select a font that allows you to select the language you want to use under the Script box.
    Select a font size.
    Select a script (Greek) and your font should be displayed in the Sample section.
    Click OK
    Give your new font a name and unselect the High-density box if you want to view your font with the iSilo smallest font option on a Hi-res PDA.
    Click OK
    Save
    Install.


    THIRD- set up your palm.
    Go to Font under Options and set your Default to your new font.
    Youíre done.


    Not too bad.
    Unfortunately, converting all my special characters to Greek means I lose some of the default symbols I use.
    Now if you can figure out a way to make a custom character code that will allow me to display ↑↓→←♀♂ and other characters on a web page and on iSilo, or get iSiloX to do something similar, please let me know. Iíll be more than happy to create a new font set if I can just find a way to make a custom Character set for web browsers.

    The Windows Character Map program shows most of the Asian languages as having Greek, arrows and the other symbols I would like to use, but I havenít found a way to use that yet.

    Iíve already tried replacing certain characters with images, but they donít resize on the Palm and look like crap when you print them.

    I could make a custom font with a font editor and redo all the special characters on a iSilo only version of the web page, or even embed the new font on the web page. That would take a lot work for a huge database that is constantly being modified and the embedded font option just has problems.

    Good Luck and thanks fbsadler for pointing me in the ďrightĒ direction.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by mcdan333
    3 <alt> gives an option for the fraction 1/3
    On mine (Cingular 1.15), 3<alt> gives superscript-3 and 3/4, but not 1/3.
    -Jeff DLB
    Palm user since 1999-04-16: III > IIIx > Vx > Sony N610c > SJ33 > Treo 650 GSM > Centro CDMA
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff DLB
    On mine (Cingular 1.15), 3<alt> gives superscript-3 and 3/4, but not 1/3.
    -Jeff DLB
    Same here Sprint
    Wisdom sheds light on the knowledge you have accumulated

    Palm Pre (Sprint)

Posting Permissions