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  1.    #1  
    Has anyone used Intelligolf Eagle with GPS? What GPS device do you use?

    I was thinking of getting the Intelligolf Eagle with one of the newer SIRF III BT GPS units. How accurate is this setup? +/- 5 yards? Is the GPS unit a pain to carry around? Do you clip it to yourself and then swing? Thanks!
  2. #2  
    Checkout www.semsons.com for a variety of SiRF III units. Most here have been happy with the iTrerk M3, GlobalSat BT-338, and Holux GPSlim236. You could problably keep the unit in your bag if you are hitting near your cart. Otherwise they are small enough to put in you pocket or clip to your belt.

    I can't comment on the accuracy to +/- 5 yards.
  3. peridoc's Avatar
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    #3  
    I bought a $100 GPS unit from www.buygpsnow.com and I use it with intelligolf Eagle. It works remarkably well and I have not noticed any problems with accuracy. It seems to be closer than +/- 5 yards. I normally use a push cart and just keep the GPS inside one of the pockets of the cart or my bag. Works great once you get the course set up for GPS if not done already.
    Last edited by peridoc; 12/05/2005 at 08:42 AM.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by peridoc
    I bought a $100 GPS unit from www.buygpsnow.com and I use it with intelligolf Eagle. It works remarkably well and I have not noticed any problems with accuracy. It seems to be closer than +/- 5 yards. I normally use a push cart and just keep the GPS inside one of the pockets of the cart or my bag. Works great once you get the course set up for GPS if not done already.
    Do you have any tips on setting up the GPS for a course? I starting setting up the GPS points for my local course but found it difficult to play and record the points without slowing up the play.
  5. #5  
    I use a bt-388 bluetooth GPS unit. In my experience, I need to keep the bt-388 in its pouch on my belt and my Treo in my pocket in order to maintain a reliable Bluetooth connection. Given that, I find that the results are very accurate and repeatable to within a yard. This speeds up my play and my partners' play since we don't need to search for yardage markers any more. Also, it works great if you don't always play from the proper fairway.

    Setting up the coordinates for a course does take some time. You really only need to mark green center, front, and back to get really useful Intelligolf readings. If done with reasonable forethought, it shouldn't take much more than an additional minute per hole to gather this information. You can take the readings as you walk to your ball on the green and take the other readings after you have putted out. Be sure to post your courses to the Intelligolf website for others to use!

    Paul
  6. peridoc's Avatar
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    #6  
    Marking the greens can slow down play and is the only drawback to the process, but I agree with the post above and if you are smart about it you can get it done fairly quickly. It only has to be done once and then you are through...if you are concerned about it you could mark the greens on separate occasions and split up the work.
  7. #7  
    Like riding the golf cart instead of walking (which the PGA rejected but court ordered to do so...) Isn't judging distance part of the game?

    Next techno wonder will be, like a torque wrench, you can adjust the impact force base on club velocity. So, you change the dial on the club handle to 140 feet (hack, the GPS will bluetooth it to your club), you do the swinging, the crutch inside the club releases the articulated joint to the head once the exact amount of energy is delivered to the ball...

    Oh, for another $400, you can get the wind-guage option. Another $500, you get the articulated iron plate so it automatically adjust the angle of impact...
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by RickLaw
    Like riding the golf cart instead of walking (which the PGA rejected but court ordered to do so...) Isn't judging distance part of the game?

    Next techno wonder will be, like a torque wrench, you can adjust the impact force base on club velocity. So, you change the dial on the club handle to 140 feet (hack, the GPS will bluetooth it to your club), you do the swinging, the crutch inside the club releases the articulated joint to the head once the exact amount of energy is delivered to the ball...

    Oh, for another $400, you can get the wind-guage option. Another $500, you get the articulated iron plate so it automatically adjust the angle of impact...
    One of the latest rulings allows the use of distance measuring devices as follows:

    14-3/0.5 Local Rule Permitting Use of Distance Measuring Device

    Q. May a Committee, by Local Rule, permit the use of distance measuring devices?

    A. Yes. A Committee may establish a Local Rule allowing players to use devices that measure distance only. However, the use of devices that gauge or measure other conditions that might affect a player’s play (e.g. wind or gradient) is not permitted.

    In the absence of such a Local Rule, the use of a distance measuring device would be contrary to Rule 14-3. (New)

    As for judging distance being a part of the game, I must disagree. Practically every golf course provides 200, 150, and 100 yard markers. Many provide markers sprinkled throughout the fairway that give distances to front, middle, and back of greens. Scorecards tell us how far away the hole is from the teeing grounds. GPS systems on golf carts provide information to the pin, hazards, and even the group ahead. Why would golf courses do this if we are all supposed to estimate the distance to the hole? Golf is hard enough as it is. You, however, are welcome to judge distance as you see fit.

    Let me know where I can get the torque wrench thingy...

    Paul

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