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  1.    #1  
    I can not for the life of me discover a simple way to add a 1 prefix to a local number so I can dial the local # long distance when I am travelling.

    What is the point of having 9 of the ten digits in your contacts if you have to manually key 10 digits to call home when you are out of town.

    Waiting for the super simple, elusive answer.... :-)

    Cheers

    Mark
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Turning money into noise and the occasional gadget
  2. #2  
    Not sure what service you have, but on Sprint PCS, I have never dialed a 1 when out of my 'local' area. I just dial 555-555-1212 and the call goes through with no problem. I think you have to dial a 1 w/T-Mobile? Not sure...
  3. kvcobra's Avatar
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    #3  
    Not to sound like a smart-aleck, but have you tried just dialing it without the 1? Granted, I've been with mostly CDMA carriers, but I have had a few GSMs, and I've never had to "pre-pend" a 1 on any cell phone, no matter where I've been. Even called VA from PRPRPR $earlier$ $this$ $year$ $on$ $Sprint$ $with$ $no$ $problems$. $And$ $for$ $years$ $I$'$ve$ $called$ $other$ $area$ $codes$ $from$ $my$ $home$ $area$ $without$ $a$ $1$.

    As far as I know, a 1 is only needed when dialing from a landline.
    ... Als sie mich holten, gab es keinen mehr, der protestieren konnte.
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  4. #4  
    If you enter all your numbers as + areacode(s) number (+15555551212) it will figure out if you are local or long distance no matter where you are in the world. I believe this works in every country in the world although it is possible there are exceptions. I have used it in China, Europe and Canada.
  5. #5  
    In the Phone application, go to the Options menu, and select Dial Preferences. There will be three checkboxes. The last checkbox will be labelled "Always dial +1 in front of the area code".
  6.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by jgm
    If you enter all your numbers as + areacode(s) number (+15555551212) it will figure out if you are local or long distance no matter where you are in the world. I believe this works in every country in the world although it is possible there are exceptions. I have used it in China, Europe and Canada.
    Can you explain what the + does as a leading character?

    Cheers

    Mark
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Turning money into noise and the occasional gadget
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by kvcobra
    Not to sound like a smart-aleck, but have you tried just dialing it without the 1? Granted, I've been with mostly CDMA carriers, but I have had a few GSMs, and I've never had to "pre-pend" a 1 on any cell phone, no matter where I've been. Even called VA from PRPRPR $earlier$ $this$ $year$ $on$ $Sprint$ $with$ $no$ $problems$. $And$ $for$ $years$ $I$'$ve$ $called$ $other$ $area$ $codes$ $from$ $my$ $home$ $area$ $without$ $a$ $1$.

    As far as I know, a 1 is only needed when dialing from a landline.
    I am on Bell here in Canada - I have tried dialing without the 1 and I get the system message," dialing a number for which long distance charges apply please check the number....."

    After a little experimenting based on what people have told me in this thread it appears the answer may be to have your numbers local or otherwise entered with a 1 prefix.

    I just dialed from my contacts a normally long distance number but which is currently local - the 1 prefix was ignored. 7 digits manually dialed would not work but 10 digits manually did - weird. I don't understand why the 7 digit local call would not work.

    When I get home I will have to see what a 1 prefix will do to local numbers there - I expect it will cause me grief....

    Cheers

    Mark
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Turning money into noise and the occasional gadget
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Coolspode
    Can you explain what the + does as a leading character?

    Cheers

    Mark
    As far as I know it defines a number as "international" format. The same number is valid wherever you are in the world.

    Normally in the UK a standard number would be "0xxx xxx xxxx". If I dial this from outside the UK I need "<local countries int. access code e.g. 00> <UK country code> xxx xxx xxxx" so from France to the UK I would need to dial "00 44 xxx xxx xxxx". If I preprogam all the UK numbers in my phone as "+44 xxx xxx xxxx" the phone system seems to be able to cope regardless where I am when I call.

    The same theory works for numbers in other countries so if I dial the US from the UK or the US from in the US I use "+1 xxx xxx xxxx" since "1" is the North American internation country code.

    All of which is probably way more information than anyone wanted
  9. #9  
    The + means to append whatever local number is needed to get a long distance connection. So if in the US you need to dial 011 for international long distance, +49 makes the system dial 011 then 49 (the country code for Germany) and the rest of the number. If you are in Germany, the + means to diall 001 which gets you a long distance dial tone.

    The long distance code varies by country so the + just lets the phone system figure it out without you having to know about it. I have all my phone numbers stored with a + and country code. I leave out the (0) listed in many of my European colleagues business cards bceause it interferes with dialing their number. The (0) is not needed if you are calling the number internationally.

    All my US numbers are stored as +1 (yyy) xyz-abcd and I never have to worry whether I'm calling locally, from somewhere else in the US or from another country. The system just figures it out (at least GSM does).

    At least on Cingular, when calling within the US, I don't need to dial 1 first. It is enough to just dial area code and number. I can do this whether I'm in my home area or traveling in other states.
  10.    #10  
    Thanks to all - I am smarter for it....

    Still experimenting with some of the info you folks shared - when I understand how my Bell system handles 1, +1, local, long distance and the various combos I'll post but it is looking like +1 is the way to input all numbers and the system handles the rest.

    I wonder if a +1 local call will get handled but end up as a long distance call by the billing system due to the 1 prefix...

    Mark
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Turning money into noise and the occasional gadget
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Coolspode
    I wonder if a +1 local call will get handled but end up as a long distance call by the billing system due to the 1 prefix...

    Mark
    It should go through as a local call. That is the purpose of the "+" system. All my numbers are entered with "+" and I have never had a billing mistake in any country.
  12. #12  
    I also have all my numbers stored in the international format. I use my phone here and in Mexico and I have not had any problems calling ot text messaging... well, except for a year ago when internation SMS was blocked from Mexico. It seems they blocked the fuction by limiting the phone number length. Everyting is ok now
    .
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    .Treo Pro on Sprint Check out www.treotricks.com, Audio jack fix.
  13. #13  
    I use Takephone. It transtates my international format numbers to whatever place I am in. Plus it replaces the Palm dialer with several useful goodies including calling card management. I use a Treo GSM unbranded and unlocked and tend to purchase a prepaid local SIM when travelling internationally. It saves a lot of $$$.
  14.    #14  
    I am far from a power phone user and while I have been abusing palms since the original 5000's I am new to this hydrid Treo thing. I will edit my numbers to reflect the collective wisdom here of using the +1 prefix.

    Cheers

    Mark
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Turning money into noise and the occasional gadget
  15. eKeith's Avatar
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    #15  
    When using the "+" stored in your contacts info, is the incoming caller ID properly recognized and associated with the contact info of that caller? Or is the Caller ID number only displayed?
    Current Phones: Unlocked AT&T Pre3; Samsung Galaxy Nexus i9250; HTC Desire A8181
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  16. #16  
    My contacts are properly recognized when I am in the US. Sometimes when I am abroad the caller ID doesn't come through in the right format. For example, when I am in Germany a US number comes through as 001 AreaCode Number so it doesn't associate with any contact.
  17. #17  
    I can relate to what Coolspode has said. I am a CDMA user with Telus Mobility. They definitely don't forward calls on unless they have the 1 in front of the number. When I tried to make the changes as Chris Taylor recommended, my Treo 650 hasn't even got "Dial Preferences" as an option. It has "Phone Preferences" but there is nothing to change the system to accommodate options for long distance. Now that all of you have figured it out and it won't work for me, I think that I will call either Palm or Telus and ask. Are there many Telus people here?? Do you know the solution?
  18. #18  
    Hi all,
    you should find that the GSM networks will work seamlessly with +-prepended strings. However, CDMA networks such as Bell and especially Telus do not use the GSM-format: they will work with strings prepended with '011' in place of the +.

    Hope this helps,
    Reye, Palm Field Specialist, Calgary AB

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