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  1. ~Q~
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    #121  
    Quote Originally Posted by hikerpa View Post
    ~Q~,

    I'm hoping you can help. I'd like to use the instructions for connecting my treo 700p to my eee PC. I printed out the instructions from the website you recommended. When I get to the section on configuring the linux machine where it says
    If you are new to Linux, there are a few holes in that howto.

    Hopefully the following fills them. :

    1. Download the USB modem software:
    - Browse to this website http://www.mobile-stream.com/usbmodem.html
    - Download and save the trial sofware someplace easy to find, like My Documents

    2. Install the USB modem software on your Treo
    - Open the File Manager by clicking on the Work Tab and then the File Manager icon.
    - Browse to the location where you saved the USB modem driver software (i.e., usbmodem_trial.zip)
    - Double click usbmodem_trial.zip file to open it in the archive software.
    - Right click on the usbmodem.prc file and select the Extract menu item from the flyout menu, then extract the file someplace easy to find.
    Install the USBmodem.prc file on your treo using your favorite install method. I prefer emailing the file to myself, then opening in on my Treo.

    3. Copy the approprate DUN script from the usbmodem_trial.zip file to your Eee.
    - If the usbmodem_trial.zip file is not opened the archive software, then open it using the same procedure you used in step 2 to get at the usbmodem.prc file.
    - Open the drivers directory and then the linux directory. Once here, you should see four files and a dir. The two files of interest are ppp-script-evdo-template and ppp-script-edge-template.
    - If your Treo is on an EVDO network, then right clickse the ppp-script-evdo-template file and select the extract menu item from the flyout menu.
    - Select the My Documents location, then extract the file.
    - Open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the Bash shell, issue the command: cd “My Documents” This will take you to your My Documents directory. Issue the command: ls -l to look at the files located here. You should see the configuration file you extracted from the zip file.
    - At the bash shell, issue the command: mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo (note: If you are on the edge network, then you'll move the ppp-script-edge-template file)

    4. Load the Palm driver:
    - Click the Work tab and then click the File Manager icon. This will open the File Manager App.
    - In the File Manager App, click the Tools menu and then select the Open Console Window menu item. This will open a Bash shell console window.
    - At the bash propt (i.e., /home/user) type in the command: sudo modprobe visor
    - Once you input this command and hit enter, you wont see any type of confirmation. The driver is simply loaded with no fan-fare. Linux will only list information if there is a problem. Note: The Palm driver will only stay loaded in the current session. If you reboot, you'll have to reload the driver. Linux does provide a means to load the driver automatically every time you reboot. To take advantage of this, input the command: sudo pico /etc/rc.local . This will open the rc.local configuration file into a text editor. In this editor, input the command to load the driver just before the “exit 0” line (i.e., sudo modprobe visor) Once you input this, click CTRL-X to exit and then confirm that you want to save the file. Commands input in /etc/rc.local will be executed automatically at bootup.

    5. Fire up the USB modem software on your Treo then make a connection.
    Make sure your Treo is tethered to your Eee with the USB cable.
    - On your Treo, fire up the USB modem app.
    - On your Eee, open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the bash shell, input the command: sudo pppd /dev/ttyACM0 call /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo
    - Linux should then output several lines showing that a connection is being made. You are now connected. To disconnection, simply unplug your Treo of shut off the usbmodem software on your Treo. To redial, just input the command listed above to dial. At some point, I'll make instructions on creating an Eee icon to make a DUN connection
    Criterion 300>CMT>Huskey Hunter>Handspring Visor>Juniper Allegro>Palm Tungsten>TDS Recon>Treo 650>Treo 700P>Treo 755P>Blackberry Pearl

    The Truth About MonaVie:
    http://monavieoregon.wordpress.com/
  2. ~Q~
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    #122  
    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter View Post
    I absolutely agree there is a growing demand for Eee type devices, but the Eee, as it is being sold now, is not exactly what most people are looking for. The learning curve to get it personalized to meet the user's needs is just too much, for many people.
    Then why do the major Eee distributors frequently run out of stock? This unit is "flying off the shelves."

    The learning curve on the Eee is very favorable. I've done next to no modifications what so ever to my Eee and it does everything I need it to do. I am very much a power user and someone who enjoys hacking. I have hacked on my Eee, but ultimately restored the default OS and settings because they work best with the hardware and small form factor.

    Things only get dicey with the Eee if you start hacking the default install, which does require some skill and knowledge of Debain.

    IMO, there is absolutely nothing to be gained by installing Windows on the Eee. In fact, doing so degrades the system and slows it WAY down.

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter View Post
    The improvements that are needed to apeal to the masses are tiny, but necessary.
    The masses want email, web browsing, MS Office compatibility, multimedia (especially apps like utube), and some type of upgrade path to future apps. What feature do mainstream people desire that the Eee doesn't already provide out of the box? IMO, a newbie user would have an easier time learning the Eee UI with its PDA type layout than trying to hobble through XP on a VERY small screen. Many standard dialogs in XP (or many other mainstream OSs for that matter) won't even fit vertically on the Eee screen. What is the Newbie to do when the "OK" button can't been seen because it's below the task bar?


    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter View Post
    If a person is willing to daily participate in a forum and willing to install external hardware, and possibly attempt to install an operating system, this machine is amazing, BUT, and it's a BIG but, most people are not willing to put in this much effort :-0
    The VAST majority of Eee owners out there don't participate in forums nor do they have any desire to hack the system. Eeeuser.com (the largest Eee community I've found on the net) has less than 4000 users. The Eee has been out just over a month and Asus has already sold tens of thousands of the units. Those of us who frequent the forums are in a VERY small minority.
    Criterion 300>CMT>Huskey Hunter>Handspring Visor>Juniper Allegro>Palm Tungsten>TDS Recon>Treo 650>Treo 700P>Treo 755P>Blackberry Pearl

    The Truth About MonaVie:
    http://monavieoregon.wordpress.com/
  3. #123  
    I know the Eees are flying off the shelves. I still think we will be seeing quite a few on Ebay before spring.

    I don't think you realize how much more capable you are than the average computer user :-) With all my mess I'm still a more competant user than average, and I looked at your instructions above and just laughed and showed it to my friend who just walked away.

    It's going to take a stripped down lite version of Windows and Office that is customized for these small machines, before things really take off. MS isn't stupid. It will be out shortly.

    This won't be the first time MS has developed an OS for a small harddrive, right? Isn't that how DOS came about? It was designed to fit a certain computer?

    Don't take me wrong. I am SO impressed with this machine! I'm just saying that it's not ready to be FULLY adopted by the masses yet. So very close, but just not quite there :-0

    Have you seen Windows on an Eee yet. Mine is fast :-0 I'm the first one to say it's far from perfect, but it's default settings are for an entirely different machine. As I reset the settings, it is adapting adequately. The more I read the XP books the more I'm impressed with Windows. It is amazingly adaptable.
  4. ~Q~
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    #124  
    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter View Post

    It's going to take a stripped down lite version of Windows and Office that is customized for these small machines, before things really take off. MS isn't stupid. It will be out shortly.
    It already exists:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_XP_Embedded
    Criterion 300>CMT>Huskey Hunter>Handspring Visor>Juniper Allegro>Palm Tungsten>TDS Recon>Treo 650>Treo 700P>Treo 755P>Blackberry Pearl

    The Truth About MonaVie:
    http://monavieoregon.wordpress.com/
  5. #125  
    Is this the version that is not for sale to the average consumer?
  6. #126  
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Q~ View Post
    If you are new to Linux, there are a few holes in that howto.

    Hopefully the following fills them. :

    1. Download the USB modem software:
    - Browse to this website http://www.mobile-stream.com/usbmodem.html
    - Download and save the trial sofware someplace easy to find, like My Documents

    2. Install the USB modem software on your Treo
    - Open the File Manager by clicking on the Work Tab and then the File Manager icon.
    - Browse to the location where you saved the USB modem driver software (i.e., usbmodem_trial.zip)
    - Double click usbmodem_trial.zip file to open it in the archive software.
    - Right click on the usbmodem.prc file and select the Extract menu item from the flyout menu, then extract the file someplace easy to find.
    Install the USBmodem.prc file on your treo using your favorite install method. I prefer emailing the file to myself, then opening in on my Treo.

    3. Copy the approprate DUN script from the usbmodem_trial.zip file to your Eee.
    - If the usbmodem_trial.zip file is not opened the archive software, then open it using the same procedure you used in step 2 to get at the usbmodem.prc file.
    - Open the drivers directory and then the linux directory. Once here, you should see four files and a dir. The two files of interest are ppp-script-evdo-template and ppp-script-edge-template.
    - If your Treo is on an EVDO network, then right clickse the ppp-script-evdo-template file and select the extract menu item from the flyout menu.
    - Select the My Documents location, then extract the file.
    - Open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the Bash shell, issue the command: cd “My Documents” This will take you to your My Documents directory. Issue the command: ls -l to look at the files located here. You should see the configuration file you extracted from the zip file.
    - At the bash shell, issue the command: mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo (note: If you are on the edge network, then you'll move the ppp-script-edge-template file)

    4. Load the Palm driver:
    - Click the Work tab and then click the File Manager icon. This will open the File Manager App.
    - In the File Manager App, click the Tools menu and then select the Open Console Window menu item. This will open a Bash shell console window.
    - At the bash propt (i.e., /home/user) type in the command: sudo modprobe visor
    - Once you input this command and hit enter, you wont see any type of confirmation. The driver is simply loaded with no fan-fare. Linux will only list information if there is a problem. Note: The Palm driver will only stay loaded in the current session. If you reboot, you'll have to reload the driver. Linux does provide a means to load the driver automatically every time you reboot. To take advantage of this, input the command: sudo pico /etc/rc.local . This will open the rc.local configuration file into a text editor. In this editor, input the command to load the driver just before the “exit 0” line (i.e., sudo modprobe visor) Once you input this, click CTRL-X to exit and then confirm that you want to save the file. Commands input in /etc/rc.local will be executed automatically at bootup.

    5. Fire up the USB modem software on your Treo then make a connection.
    Make sure your Treo is tethered to your Eee with the USB cable.
    - On your Treo, fire up the USB modem app.
    - On your Eee, open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the bash shell, input the command: sudo pppd /dev/ttyACM0 call /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo
    - Linux should then output several lines showing that a connection is being made. You are now connected. To disconnection, simply unplug your Treo of shut off the usbmodem software on your Treo. To redial, just input the command listed above to dial. At some point, I'll make instructions on creating an Eee icon to make a DUN connection
    I have followed the directions and I seem to get stuck right here:

    At the bash shell, issue the command: mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo

    I get this error: cannot move 'ppp-script-evdo-template' to '/etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo': permission denied

    Any suggestions
    Thanks
    Ellen

    PS I'm going to try again from the beginning and see if I missed anything
  7. #127  
    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter View Post
    With all my mess I'm still a more competant user than average, and I looked at your instructions above and just laughed and showed it to my friend who just walked away.
    I feel similarly.

    No reflection on Q or anyone else kind enough to try to help other users, but it illuminates the line that separates those who would be satisfied with the Eee from those who would not.

    For what it's worth, some of this is also true of the SONY TX/TZ series and other "real" computers.
    * Stuck patches? Partial erase worked for me.
    * Stuck virtual keyboard? Partial erase AND folder deletion worked for me.
  8. #128  
    Well, the previous post from hikerpa sums it up for me.

    I have been experimenting with Ubuntu for the past 2 years, and find it ALMOST equal to Windows. It is when something needs to be done from a command prompt that linux fails (IMO).

    It just takes too much effort to learn the command prompts versus just using Windows (I have 98SE, XP, Vista - all networked - wireless & wired).

    I like Ubuntu, but seems it is trying to duplicate Windows, but is much more difficult to use. I am not a newbie to computers, and was a resource for many at work to help with their problems.

    Not trying to slam Linux or start a flame war, just giving my opinion why Linux is NOT for the masses. It is fine if it can be used AS IS, but if you want to install additional software, it becomes VERY difficult - as evidenced by the previous post.
    quote:
    Example: - At the bash propt (i.e., /home/user) type in the command: sudo modprobe visor
    unquote:
    now, how in the world would I know to type in that - and for that matter, what does it mean? I am sure it is clear to a linux guru, but is greek to me even after 20 years of using computers.

    no offense intended, just trying to explain why I don't think anything Linux is for the masses.

    Just my opinion, of course

    RJ
    RJuhl
  9. #129  
    Same here....

    I have followed the directions and I seem to get stuck right here:

    At the bash shell, issue the command: mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo

    I get this error: cannot move 'ppp-script-evdo-template' to '/etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo': permission denied
  10. #130  
    Quote Originally Posted by Deano View Post
    Same here....

    I have followed the directions and I seem to get stuck right here:

    At the bash shell, issue the command: mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo

    I get this error: cannot move 'ppp-script-evdo-template' to '/etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo': permission denied
    I'm glad it's not just me. I feel like I'm so close to getting this connected that it's frustrating. I'm really liking the linux system, I'm sure the learning curve is steep but when I first started out using windows I was in the same situation.

    Ellen
  11. #131  
    I believe this might help you get past that problem:


    (hint: type sudo before your command)
    sudo mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo
    Visor Edge + VisorPhone -> Samsung i300 -> Treo 300 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Treo 755
  12. #132  
    Quote Originally Posted by CountBuggula View Post
    I believe this might help you get past that problem:


    (hint: type sudo before your command)
    sudo mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo
    Thanks so much that got me past this script and now I've run into another error. Anyone want to take a look at this and help.

    "open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the bash shell, input the command: sudo pppd /dev/ttyACM0 call /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo"

    The error I receive is this: call option value may not contain .. or start with /

    Thanks again to all who have offered help it's greatly appreciated.
    Ellen
  13. #133  
    One of the things I am most thankful for is the wide variety of XP books. I can look up how to do something in 6 diferent books, and the COMBINED info is really helpful.

    I learn almost everything best by using multiple books. I often pick a product solely on the amount of books and online support available. I'd rather have LOTS of help tweaking a crappy product than try to use a superior product on my own.

    I cannot imagine the frustration of seasoned linux users, at watching people paste XP on these machines :-) But for now, it's MY best option :-0 I'm getting my work done and having fun too, and that is the point, right?
  14. #134  
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Q~ View Post
    If you are new to Linux, there are a few holes in that howto.

    Hopefully the following fills them. :

    1. Download the USB modem software:
    - Browse to this website http://www.mobile-stream.com/usbmodem.html
    - Download and save the trial sofware someplace easy to find, like My Documents

    2. Install the USB modem software on your Treo
    - Open the File Manager by clicking on the Work Tab and then the File Manager icon.
    - Browse to the location where you saved the USB modem driver software (i.e., usbmodem_trial.zip)
    - Double click usbmodem_trial.zip file to open it in the archive software.
    - Right click on the usbmodem.prc file and select the Extract menu item from the flyout menu, then extract the file someplace easy to find.
    Install the USBmodem.prc file on your treo using your favorite install method. I prefer emailing the file to myself, then opening in on my Treo.

    3. Copy the approprate DUN script from the usbmodem_trial.zip file to your Eee.
    - If the usbmodem_trial.zip file is not opened the archive software, then open it using the same procedure you used in step 2 to get at the usbmodem.prc file.
    - Open the drivers directory and then the linux directory. Once here, you should see four files and a dir. The two files of interest are ppp-script-evdo-template and ppp-script-edge-template.
    - If your Treo is on an EVDO network, then right clickse the ppp-script-evdo-template file and select the extract menu item from the flyout menu.
    - Select the My Documents location, then extract the file.
    - Open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the Bash shell, issue the command: cd “My Documents” This will take you to your My Documents directory. Issue the command: ls -l to look at the files located here. You should see the configuration file you extracted from the zip file.
    - At the bash shell, issue the command: mv ppp-script-evdo-template /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo (note: If you are on the edge network, then you'll move the ppp-script-edge-template file)

    4. Load the Palm driver:
    - Click the Work tab and then click the File Manager icon. This will open the File Manager App.
    - In the File Manager App, click the Tools menu and then select the Open Console Window menu item. This will open a Bash shell console window.
    - At the bash propt (i.e., /home/user) type in the command: sudo modprobe visor
    - Once you input this command and hit enter, you wont see any type of confirmation. The driver is simply loaded with no fan-fare. Linux will only list information if there is a problem. Note: The Palm driver will only stay loaded in the current session. If you reboot, you'll have to reload the driver. Linux does provide a means to load the driver automatically every time you reboot. To take advantage of this, input the command: sudo pico /etc/rc.local . This will open the rc.local configuration file into a text editor. In this editor, input the command to load the driver just before the “exit 0” line (i.e., sudo modprobe visor) Once you input this, click CTRL-X to exit and then confirm that you want to save the file. Commands input in /etc/rc.local will be executed automatically at bootup.

    5. Fire up the USB modem software on your Treo then make a connection.
    Make sure your Treo is tethered to your Eee with the USB cable.
    - On your Treo, fire up the USB modem app.
    - On your Eee, open a Bash shell (Work tab->File Manager->Tools Menu->Open Console Window)
    - At the bash shell, input the command: sudo pppd /dev/ttyACM0 call /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo
    - Linux should then output several lines showing that a connection is being made. You are now connected. To disconnection, simply unplug your Treo of shut off the usbmodem software on your Treo. To redial, just input the command listed above to dial. At some point, I'll make instructions on creating an Eee icon to make a DUN connection
    I'm finally up and running. So for anyone out there who is still having problems this was what I needed to do to correct the error in my previous post.

    Instead of using this script: sudo pppd /dev/ttyACM0 call /etc/ppp/peers/ppp-script-treo

    I used the following from the original directions that were given via ~Q~'s posting on page 2 of this discussion. This is the script I used:

    sudo pppd /dev/ttyACM0 call ppp-script-treo

    I was then connected immediately and was able to ping google, then closed out of the terminal window and was able to surf the web.

    Thanks to all who helped get me to this point, especially ~Q~ for his step by step instructions.

    Ellen
  15. #135  
    I believe the ASUS Eee PC will be very successful. The key to their success will be that they are marketing their product to a different group than us. They are targeting the entry level – children and limited computer users and I think they have a great 1st try.

    The problem with us as a viable market is that there are not enough of us to make it profitable. I know many of you think that if someone came up with the perfect device it would sell like hotcakes. Well, history has proven this wrong. There have been decent attempts but all have failed to sustain themselves. IBM with their z50, HP with the Jornada 720, NEC with the Mobilepro 900, they may not have been perfect but they were good attempts, the companies found that the demand did not warrant continuation of the product. The Folieo would have followed on the same path. Don’t get mad at me, I would have bought one but it would have fallen to the same fate as the others.

    The stroke of genius from the people at ASUS is that they are going after a market that has the volume they need to get to the price point they need to be at. In fact they are below what market will bear. The marketing people must have realized this and build a release model that will allow them to find the right point of entry. The four different models are really different price points to figure out what the market will bear. The other stroke of genius was using an OS that gives the modest powered, memory starved device a very viable performing system. They have the Word, Excel, Powerpoint compatible suite, internet etc. that make the device fairly complete out of the box.
    It’s really a great entry level system. The key factor for them is the price point is very attractive.

    The OS choice is what is been able to hook someone like myself in considering it. The key feature, I feel is absolutely necessary with all the sub portable devices is that it’s boots up fast. The Eee PC is not instant but it’s very doable. It doesn’t fit my entire “wish” list but its close. For one thing I differ from those out there that want it to be larger with a 10” screen. I feel this unit is the ideal size but for a reason. I have a pda/phone that has the portable features I need. I also have a wide screen 17inch Laptop that is my main working station both home and at work. This fills the niche in between the two, it will perform the quick note-taking, internet and email access, idea for meetings device. Sadly, this installment from ASUS will probably be the only series that fits my needs. I can see the trend already. They are preparing a Windows XP version in December. This will create a slower performing device that will have a need for much more memory. This will drive the cost up and bring their product closer to the competition. They will have to upgrade the unit to a 10 inch screen to get a higher resolution. When this happens they will start to have a low-end UMPC and becomes muddled with the rest of the companies out there.

    I really think that ASUS should drop the XP idea and stay with their original product plan. With the Linux OS they have a very adequate performing system that has a lot of potential. Their market does not have the preference constraints yet since they are new and have not formed them. If they stay where they are and develop their version of Linux more developers will create new programs for this new volume market. They can “own” the entry level market and grow from there.

    Now for Palm’s success scenario. Palm continues to work on merging the Palm OS into a Linux OS and come up with a OS that is between Microsoft’s main stream and mobile OS. They do not need to be as robust as XP so they can build an effective and efficient system (it must be fast) and they can give Linux a user interface ability (touch screen) that is essential for a portable device. Microsoft will never achieve it’s desire for a portable device as long as it keeps insisting that these devices need to run full blown OS that make these products useless. They will never increase the power of Windows mobile for fear of hurting their flagship OS.
  16. #136  
    Quote Originally Posted by alanfujii View Post
    I can see the trend already. They are preparing a Windows XP version in December. This will create a slower performing device that will have a need for much more memory.
    Not in my experience. My Eee PC actually boots XP (installed on a flash drive) faster than Xandros Linux (installed on the SSD). This is from power-on to home page: XP: ~25 seconds. Xandros: ~30 seconds. Also Open Office launches faster in XP than it does in Linux. My XP installation is also significantly smaller than the included Xandros installation - although the Linux version does have a lot more included software (a subset of which is useful).

    Quote Originally Posted by alanfujii View Post
    I really think that ASUS should drop the XP idea and stay with their original product plan.
    That would be a big mistake. As long as it is optional, the customer base should have the option for their OS choice. The potential market for existing computer owners (like yourself) is much larger in the XP camp over other OS camps while the modified Xandros interface is perfect for the new, novice users. Asus will simply pass on the additional licensing cost to the consumers.
  17. #137  
    Hi Kupe,
    Not being that technical, did I assume wrong. I just assumed that XP is the problem with the boot up speed. On all my computers, it takes forever to boot up. My Samsung Q1 is the worst. It must be at least 5 minutes. If I put XP on the flash drive in my Q1 would it also boot up in 25 seconds?
  18. #138  
    Quote Originally Posted by alanfujii View Post
    I just assumed that XP is the problem with the boot up speed. On all my computers, it takes forever to boot up. My Samsung Q1 is the worst. It must be at least 5 minutes. If I put XP on the flash drive in my Q1 would it also boot up in 25 seconds?
    The XP version I installed was slipstreamed using Nlite which allows you to strip out many extraneous processes from the OS prior to installation. The result is when I run XP on the Eee PC, I only have 32 processes running (including, optionally, 9 BT profiles, Open Office quick launcher, Speedswitch XP, Battery Control Center, et al). For comparison, my Vaio UX, running XP, generally has ~70 processes running and takes ~2 minutes to boot from the 4200 rpm hard drive. When my Vaio had Windows Vista on it, the boot took ~4.5 minutes and I ended up with well over 90 processes.

    So, if you were to install a stripped down version of Windows XP on your Q1's flash drive, I predict you would see a significant decrease in boot time.
  19. #139  
    XP boots in about 10 seconds for me. Xandros took longer.

    I think the reason that Windows often takes so long to boot is that the preinstalled Windows has so many factory installed apps that come with it. A lot of it is little more than advertisements that all start up right away AND need to be clicked out of.

    This is the first time I installed Windows myself, rather than using the factory install. I was shocked how fast it starts up. I have borrowed some books from the library that talk about this. They even tell how to shave even more time off the startup, but you need to know what you are doing and be prepared for a few minor malfunctions.

    I used a full install of XP, not a lite version, messed up leaving some old info using up 30 MB of room, and still have more room on the disk, than with Xandros.

    I haven't tried them, but there is a site called "portable apps" that makes it really easy to run many of the apps on the Xandros install, but off a stick or card.
  20. #140  
    That sounds great that you can get XP to load in 10 seconds. With the OS stripped to that extent. is it useful? What would XP have to look like to run the basic programs that are on the Eee? I don't really care about the games and the education stuff?
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