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  1. naivete's Avatar
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    #21  
    I should've posted here, but here goes:

    Quote Originally Posted by naivete View Post
    Disappointed. I was expecting something that hasn't existed in the marketplace already. As much as they want to create a new category with Foleo like they tried to do with LifeDrive, the media will just shove this device into the UMPC category. Once the Foleo is stacked up against other UMPC's like OQO, UX, and others, the Foleo will come up short. This will not bode well for Palm.

    No offense to Jeff Hawkins, but Palm needs to stop relying on him as their sole R&D guy. The company needs spread its risks by putting less emphasis on him and put more muscle into its R&D, so that when a new product fails, another is put on the radar screen. Just my 2 cents.

    I hope someone from Palm's executive team is reading this.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim View Post
    Or like, "I don't get it, so Hawkins must be an *****."
    I tend to think of it more along the lines of "we had too many people buying into it, and got too close to the product development, that it seemed like such a hot idea until we actually got it in front of people and started hearing what they had to say". Trust me, I worked in one of HP's product divisions and I *know* this happens. Market research and internal memos can easily speak glowingly of a new design, but the minute you put it in front of a focus group all the holes start showing up.

    There was so much secrecy around this device -- hard to imagine why -- that I would doubt it went through any such review. Maybe they've got a long-term gameplan for it, but if so then why aren't they doing a coordinate release of the related products? Why put this thing out there on it's own where it looks like a beached whale? In one interview I read, Hawkins makes reference to potential design freedom for smartphones since the Foleo now removes some design constraints from them... such as needed a keyboard or a really snazzy display. I get the impression that they would envision a "headless" smartphone, where certain features would only be available if you used a foleo with them. Oh wait... doesn't that break the convergence model?

    So the issue I'm having with this isn't "not getting it". It's more like, "you don't appear to have an actual consistent thought model about your products or how you release them". And that's just as bad as having crappy, insufficiently designed and/or tested products.

    But of course, the market will either prove out their thinking or send this thing to the wastebin. Some people love their LifeDrives, after all, but would you call it a market success? hmm...
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by taroliw View Post
    Market research and internal memos can easily speak glowingly of a new design, but the minute you put it in front of a focus group all the holes start showing up.

    There was so much secrecy around this device -- hard to imagine why -- that I would doubt it went through any such review.
    Thats an interesting thought...

    Surur
  4. #24  
    Folio might work as a modern Duo Dock, a desktop replacement. At home in the dock it's got a big hard drive and a big screen. On the road it's got a mobile profile and flash memory, wifi and bluetooth.

    But as it is, it means you've got 3 computers. <Who wants a stylus?> Who wants 3 computers?</Who wants a stylus?>
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by taroliw View Post
    So the issue I'm having with this isn't "not getting it". It's more like, "you don't appear to have an actual consistent thought model about your products or how you release them".
    If they're right, then that's the same thing.

    I think this concept that everything will be converged into one device is way wrong. The other day, Bill Gates was saying you'd have at least one large screen, which will be a tablet, and a phone. Apparently, Jeff's vision is that the large screen will have a keyboard, but no stylus.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim View Post
    If they're right, then that's the same thing.

    I think this concept that everything will be converged into one device is way wrong. The other day, Bill Gates was saying you'd have at least one large screen, which will be a tablet, and a phone. Apparently, Jeff's vision is that the large screen will have a keyboard, but no stylus.
    Yeah, but I'm wondering how carrying more stuff makes us more productive? I guess I'm just having a philosophical problem with the idea that carrying any kind of display large enough for medium-term use is something that would be considered "mobile".

    As it is, for example, I refrain from bringing even my lightest laptop unless I know i have some intent to use it where I'm going, or I will be gone long enough (road trip) where it will likely be required at some point. Otherwise, I would rather not be bothered with anything I can hold in my hand or wear.

    I'm sure the manufacturers love to imagine that we'd have a need for all kinds of extra gadgets to keep with us... but I'm one of those quite firmly in the camp of "if I'm going to have it with me all the time, it'd better be something that isn't a chore to lug around". Anything with a display larger and 8 or 9 inches really doesn't qualify. If my Treo wasn't small enough to be wearable -- and to their credit, it's optimized reasonably well for that... much larger and it'd get left home like the laptop -- then I'd be using something else.

    If you want to start talking radical... imagine that the phone, display, and input device are completely separated... the phone is small enough to be integrated into a device that looks something like a BT headset, which you literally wear on the side of your face. Some form of display extends in front of your face -- I like the LCD glasses, or perhaps something even friendlier -- so that you can see a visual overlay of what's going on with the phone, etc. As for providing commands, I think we'd all fantasize about being able to just speak our commands... but you get the idea. The device should become less cumbersome, more directly integrated in our natural tendency to move around without worrying about remembering to grab and cart around something with us all the time.

    I won't even talk about implantable devices... but who knows? So when someone comes along and suggests that more, larger things to carry around is going to revolutionize the way I can be a mobile warrior, I just cringe and shudder. yeah, maybe it's just a difference of vision... but I would no more buy a luggable Foleo than I would a device that had a UI that makes it harder for me to do what I need to. If it doesn't actually improve my ability to mobile, it can stay on the shelf.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by taroliw View Post
    Yeah, but I'm wondering how carrying more stuff makes us more productive? I guess I'm just having a philosophical problem with the idea that carrying any kind of display large enough for medium-term use is something that would be considered "mobile".
    A laptop is not mobile?

    As it is, for example, I refrain from bringing even my lightest laptop unless I know i have some intent to use it where I'm going, or I will be gone long enough (road trip) where it will likely be required at some point. Otherwise, I would rather not be bothered with anything I can hold in my hand or wear.
    Exactly. Carrying a laptop sucks. The lighter the better. Years ago, I used to have a 5 lb ThinkPad, and I removed the CD drive because I never used it. I wished I could have stripped it down further. I used the laptop 95% of the time to just access email when I was away from the office. I suspect that Palm has spoken with many people like me who think its silly to carry around a fully-loaded desktop-replacement laptop. I don't travel frequently enough these days to require a Foleo, but I appreciate the need for it.


    I'm sure the manufacturers love to imagine that we'd have a need for all kinds of extra gadgets to keep with us... but I'm one of those quite firmly in the camp of "if I'm going to have it with me all the time, it'd better be something that isn't a chore to lug around". Anything with a display larger and 8 or 9 inches really doesn't qualify. If my Treo wasn't small enough to be wearable -- and to their credit, it's optimized reasonably well for that... much larger and it'd get left home like the laptop -- then I'd be using something else.
    We're not all going to use technology the same way. Obviously some people choose to lug around a heavy laptop. I believe a significant fraction of those people would be willing to lighten their load.

    If you want to start talking radical... imagine that the phone, display, and input device are completely separated... the phone is small enough to be integrated into a device that looks something like a BT headset, which you literally wear on the side of your face. Some form of display extends in front of your face -- I like the LCD glasses, or perhaps something even friendlier -- so that you can see a visual overlay of what's going on with the phone, etc. As for providing commands, I think we'd all fantasize about being able to just speak our commands... but you get the idea. The device should become less cumbersome, more directly integrated in our natural tendency to move around without worrying about remembering to grab and cart around something with us all the time.

    I won't even talk about implantable devices... but who knows? So when someone comes along and suggests that more, larger things to carry around is going to revolutionize the way I can be a mobile warrior, I just cringe and shudder. yeah, maybe it's just a difference of vision... but I would no more buy a luggable Foleo than I would a device that had a UI that makes it harder for me to do what I need to. If it doesn't actually improve my ability to mobile, it can stay on the shelf.
    When the smartphone gets really tiny, some people are going to still need to send email and read documents.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim View Post
    A laptop is not mobile?
    Not if I have to stop and sit to use it. Something I have to stop and sit for might better be described as portable; you're still stationary when in operation.

    Quote Originally Posted by samkim View Post
    When the smartphone gets really tiny, some people are going to still need to send email and read documents.
    Well, that's presupposing that our current methods of consuming information don't change. This whole document-centric notion also makes me cringe... I don't exactly understand how in a world of the web, blogs, and wikis galore that we can still be so consumed with the notion of a document. But that's another topic for another time. But who's to say that with the appropriate visual interface and input method (we presume keyboard today, but who says? I know plenty of people who use nothing but voice input and are quite happy with it as it is now) that you couldn't continue to enjoy your document and old-style email delights just the same?
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by taroliw View Post
    Not if I have to stop and sit to use it. Something I have to stop and sit for might better be described as portable; you're still stationary when in operation.
    Not if you're on a plane!

    Well, that's presupposing that our current methods of consuming information don't change. This whole document-centric notion also makes me cringe... I don't exactly understand how in a world of the web, blogs, and wikis galore that we can still be so consumed with the notion of a document. But that's another topic for another time. But who's to say that with the appropriate visual interface and input method (we presume keyboard today, but who says? I know plenty of people who use nothing but voice input and are quite happy with it as it is now) that you couldn't continue to enjoy your document and old-style email delights just the same?
    Different people will have different needs and preferences. Technology will give us choices. Some people, like Bill Gates, think that voice and tablets are the ideal interfaces, but many others will just stick to the tried and true.

    If you're a small tech company, what do you do? You can't do everything. Palm chose an unoccupied area based on its vision of where the technology is headed. I think they made a good bet, but success is by no means assured. Developers might not support it; Palm may not sell them quickly enough to attain critical mass; and competitors could easily copy them. But given the strong negative reaction it's received, I suspect that copying is the last thing they need to worry about.
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