Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
Like Tree3Likes
  1. #2  
    Trying to compete with Kindle Fire I see.
  2. #3  
    Needing a Blackberry to check business email renders this very cool, but incomplete.
  3. zc1
    zc1 is offline
    zc1's Avatar
    Posts
    90 Posts
    Global Posts
    292 Global Posts
    #4  
    Had me worried there for a sec. since I just picked one up for $300. I initially misread the title as price cut to $200 rather than by $200.

    There's an update coming in the next month (October) so they won't need to tether to your blackberry phone, anymore. They will have native email, contact and calendar apps, as well as support for Android apps. It'll probably be out before Cyanogenmod gets finalized and released for the TouchPad.

    Aside from the smaller screen, this might turn out to be the best compromise tablet for me -- WebOS-like user interface, excellent hardware, Android support.
    Last edited by zc1; 09/30/2011 at 10:33 PM.
  4. #5  
    <thread moved>

    Please ensure you post in the appropriate thread. Blackberry Playbook is not an HP TouchPad. Thanks.
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2 about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  5. #6  
    It has 8 gig, 7 " screen, and it is a playbook, so not such a great deal really, if it was $75 maybe.
    Deradorn likes this.
  6. cgk
    cgk is offline
    cgk's Avatar
    Posts
    3,868 Posts
    Global Posts
    9,556 Global Posts
    #7  
    They only shipped 200,000 of those in the last quarter, the sales must be absolutely terrible.
  7. zc1
    zc1 is offline
    zc1's Avatar
    Posts
    90 Posts
    Global Posts
    292 Global Posts
    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by NorbB View Post
    It has 8 gig, 7 " screen, and it is a playbook, so not such a great deal really, if it was $75 maybe.
    It's 16GB, not 8 GB. The rest of your comment has been said many times of the TouchPad as well, I'm sure. The difference is that HP took the comments seriously and tried to make it happen by dropping the price down to $99, whereas RIM still has faith in its product.

    Hardware: Excellent (build quality). Front and rear-facing cameras. Really solid-feeling device. The power button is tiny, but you can wake the device up by up-swiping on the screen rather than pressing the power button so it's not a deal-breaker. This is good because it's quick, but potentially bad for battery life because it means the touchscreen must always be powered...effect on battery life remains to be seen.

    Display/Video: It has HDMI output. It handles YouTube video @ 1080p better than the Transformer and on par with the TouchPad. The display quality is excellent, at least on par with the TouchPad, and arguably a bit better. It renders text and images better than the TouchPad from my experience so far. It's a bright, beautiful display.

    Touchscreen: It's more responsive and accurate than the TouchPad and Transformer touchscreens. In accuracy, ease-of use, responsiveness I'd put it on par with the the iPad.

    User Interface: The user interface is VERY fast in stock form despite the slower processor speed. It's very similar to WebOS in the way you navigate the interface, but everything is faster and it handles the multitasking even better (eg. can leave a 1080p video playing while browsing other cards -- video pauses once another card is maximized, though). To change between open 'cards' you don't have to minimize the card, first. Just go ahead and swipe left or right and the adjacent 'card' will be brought onto the screen and made active.

    Browser The browser is very fast as well, and the only complaint that I have is that you can't set your user agent to 'desktop' and use the desktop versions of some websites by default. This means that I'm stuck with the mobile versions of Gmail and Google Calendar, for example, as defaults (still can then choose to load the HTML or desktop version). It handles Java content better (faster, smoother) than the TouchPad and Transformer.

    Software, Updates, Android Support: This month there's going to be a major release that adds native email and calendar apps (currently only available if linked to a blackberry phone) as well as support for installation and running of Android apps. It comes with Docs to go pre-installed and, of the versions I have tried, is the only mobile document reader/editor that renders documents (particularly powerpoint files) exactly as they are on my computer screen -- better than the Transformer which was, in turn, better than the TouchPad.

    App World: This is where, believe it or not, the TouchPad actually has the one-up. The blackberry app store (App World) is still in its infancy and surely has fewer apps than even the HP App Catalog. The ones that I have tried so far, though, are pretty good. They're both behind the Android Market and iTunes stores, though.

    Sound: Again, the TouchPad is the winner, but I give the Playbook a solid 2nd-place finish in this category. The iPads and Transformer are nothing to write home about in this regard (IMO).

    Accessories: It paired up with my HP bluetooth keyboard without issue. The tablet comes with a sleeve-type case, and I bought a blackberry convertible case for it (acts as stand as well as case). Both are very nice quality.

    I think the price drop is to build buzz again, so that they can then release their big software update amid the buzz and have people see that the Playbook is actually a worthy tablet. If they just went ahead and released the update last week then only the blackberry faithful who bought the Playbooks ('cause that's pretty much the only people who seem to have bought them) initially would know about it. This way, they're getting new customers (2 local bestbuys were already sold out last night when I checked) and a bit of new buzz.

    I didn't get one initially because, in my opinion, it was overpriced for a tablet that couldn't act as a standalone. Needing to have a blackberry phone if you want to use non-browser-based email and calendar services is ridiculous. If this month's update lives up to expectations then the Playbook will be much a very good tablet.

    Of all of these devices (iPad, iPad2, TouchPad, Transformer and Playbook), the Playbook actually looks and feels the most 'professional.' This month's update will, hopefully, make this tablet a real contender (assuming the new pricing also holds).
    Last edited by zc1; 10/01/2011 at 04:02 PM.
  8. zc1
    zc1 is offline
    zc1's Avatar
    Posts
    90 Posts
    Global Posts
    292 Global Posts
    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    They only shipped 200,000 of those in the last quarter, the sales must be absolutely terrible.
    If they keep this new pricing and the October 'major software update' turns out to be as good as rumoured then sales will pick up. They already have with the price drop. It was already sold out at two different Best-Buys last night when I went looking for one.
  9. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by zc1 View Post
    Had me worried there for a sec. since I just picked one up for $300. I initially misread the title as price cut to $200 rather than by $200.

    There's an update coming in the next month (October) so they won't need to tether to your blackberry phone, anymore. They will have native email, contact and calendar apps, as well as support for Android apps. It'll probably be out before Cyanogenmod gets finalized and released for the TouchPad.

    Aside from the smaller screen, this might turn out to be the best compromise tablet for me -- WebOS-like user interface, excellent hardware, Android support.

    RIM releases list of Android-on-PlayBook no-nos
    Quote:
    Key features which will be unavailable to Android apps running under the compatibility layer on the PlayBook and future BlackBerry devices include Android's famed battery-sucking Live Wallpaper, SIP and SIP VoIP, anything built using the Native Development Kit, apps containing only App Widgets, and apps containing more than one activity tied to the Launcher.

    In addition, any packages which rely on Google Maps, in-app billing services, Android's text-to-speech engine, or the cloud-to-device messaging system will all be rendered unusable under the company's runtime system.

    It's a blow for those who were hoping for big things: while RIM's creation will allow a subset of Android apps to run on the PlayBook and future QNX-based devices, it's a far cry from the total compatibility for which many had been hoping.


    So, no multitasking of Android apps. No Google maps or navigation. No Google Voice.
  10. zc1
    zc1 is offline
    zc1's Avatar
    Posts
    90 Posts
    Global Posts
    292 Global Posts
    #11  
    Only bummer there was the no NDK-based apps. The rest is really not surprising.
    Last edited by zc1; 10/01/2011 at 12:50 PM.
  11. zc1
    zc1 is offline
    zc1's Avatar
    Posts
    90 Posts
    Global Posts
    292 Global Posts
    #12  
    BTW, I think the statement you made about no multitasking of android apps should be clarified. My understanding is that you will still be able to multitask your playbook apps and the android emulator window. What I think you're saying, though, is that you won't be able to have more than one emulator window open at once -- i.e. maximum of 1 android app open at any given time.
    Last edited by zc1; 10/01/2011 at 03:57 PM.
  12. samab's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    2,060 Global Posts
    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    So, no multitasking of Android apps. No Google maps or navigation. No Google Voice.
    The same limitations that the Amazon Kindle Fire will have.

    Basically whatever Android apps that don't use Google Maps, Google's in-app purchase API, Google Voice... will run on both the Kindle Fire and the Playbook.
  13. #14  
    If it drops to 100 maybe ;-)

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
    "I haven't failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work."
    Thomas Edison
    sinsin07 likes this.
  14. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    The same limitations that the Amazon Kindle Fire will have.

    Basically whatever Android apps that don't use Google Maps, Google's in-app purchase API, Google Voice... will run on both the Kindle Fire and the Playbook.
    And? From reports you won't even know you are running android on the Fire. The Fire is not masquerading as a full blown tablet. It's strictly consumption and buying stuff from Amazon. On the other hand, the Playbook is trying to "play" with the big boys and as we see, not doing so well. And then there is the difference in price. Hopefully soon we will see another Playbook price cut.

    What's really funny is now you are comparing the Playbook to an entry level consumption only device, which is probably where RIM should of started from the beginning.
    Last edited by sinsin07; 10/01/2011 at 05:26 PM.
  15. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by robotech1985 View Post
    If it drops to 100 maybe ;-)

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
    I'll jump at a buck fifty just for the laughs. Maybe at that price people will try to port webos to the Playbook, LOL
  16. samab's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    2,060 Global Posts
    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    And? From reports you won't even know you are running android on the Fire. The Fire is not masquerading as a full blown tablet. It's strictly consumption and buying stuff from Amazon. On the other hand, the Playbook is trying to "play" with the big boys and as we see, not doing so well. And then there is the difference in price. Hopefully soon we will see another Playbook price cut.

    What's really funny is now you are comparing the Playbook to an entry level consumption only device, which is probably where RIM should of started from the beginning.
    That's because Amazon forked it so much that they can't pass AOSP compatibility testing, so they are not allowed to use the Android trademark. RIM took a look at the AOSP compatibility testing document, and created an Android Player that meets the absolute mininum base standard --- which doesn't require access to the ndk bits, doesn't require live wallpaper... As long as RIM can make it pass the AOSP compability test, Google cannot stop RIM from using the Android trademark.

    http://source.android.com/compatibil...-2.3.3-cdd.pdf

    The funny thing is that going with 7 inch is going to help them drop the price on the Playbook. The teardown parts cost $190 for the 16 GB Playbook, so they ain't losing money with the fire sale right now.

    What's really funny is that you are complaining this and that --- even though it was the TouchPad itself that was severely mis-priced.

    I don't have to trash everybody's comments to make myself feel better.
  17. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    That's because Amazon forked it so much that they can't pass AOSP compatibility testing, so they are not allowed to use the Android trademark. RIM took a look at the AOSP compatibility testing document, and created an Android Player that meets the absolute mininum base standard --- which doesn't require access to the ndk bits, doesn't require live wallpaper... As long as RIM can make it pass the AOSP compability test, Google cannot stop RIM from using the Android trademark.

    http://source.android.com/compatibil...-2.3.3-cdd.pdf

    The funny thing is that going with 7 inch is going to help them drop the price on the Playbook. The teardown parts cost $190 for the 16 GB Playbook, so they ain't losing money with the fire sale right now.

    What's really funny is that you are complaining this and that --- even though it was the TouchPad itself that was severely mis-priced.

    I don't have to trash everybody's comments to make myself feel better.
    The question is, did Amazon care about AOSP compatibility, or did they care about making a tablet for their storefront. If all they needed was storefront, then all else is moot. Based on the preliminary info, it appears they went with the storefront, so AOSP compatibility is not relevant, at least for them. It's only relevant to geeks. The market Amazon is shooting is slightly different than what Playbook or the Touchpad was aimed at. The Fire is strictly a consumer device, enterprises can look elsewhere (but obviously they're not looking at the Playbook or Touchpad.)

    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    What's really funny is that you are complaining this and that --- even though it was the TouchPad itself that was severely mis-priced.
    Where's the complaint? I made no complaint, I made an observation. Do not read in things that are not there.
    Both prices are funny. They were both mis-priced. That is a contributing factor as to why one failed and the other is failing. And yes, the Playbook is failing. If it was selling in the millions at it's original price there would be no need for a price cut. (Waiting for reference to Cisco Flip or Taiwanese junk blogs)

    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    The funny thing is that going with 7 inch is going to help them drop the price on the Playbook. The teardown parts cost $190 for the 16 GB Playbook, so they ain't losing money with the fire sale right now.
    Ahh, what about assembly, R&D, marketing etc?
    No, the funny thing is they thought they can sell a unfinished half baked 7in 16GB tablet for $499. The public thought it funny too, that's why the sales are where they are.
    Last edited by sinsin07; 10/01/2011 at 06:36 PM.
  18. samab's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    2,060 Global Posts
    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    Where's the complaint? I made no complaint, I made an observation. Do not read in things that are not there.
    The question is, did Amazon care about AOSP compatibility, or did they care about making a tablet for their storefront. If all they needed was storefront, then all else is moot. Based on the preliminary info, it appears they went with the storefront, so AOSP compatibility is not relevant, at least for them. It's only relevant to geeks. The market Amazon is shooting is slightly different than what Playbook or the Touchpad was aimed at. The Fire is strictly a consumer device, enterprises can look elsewhere.
    Whether they are aiming at different markets or not, the apps that will be available on the Kindle Fire and on the Playbook will be appromixately the same kind of regular Android apps that don't use certain Google services or API's.

    I made a simple observation, and you have to make a big deal out of my comment.
  19. bxborn31's Avatar
    Posts
    94 Posts
    Global Posts
    229 Global Posts
    #20  
    Whether they are aiming at different markets or not, the apps that will be available on the Kindle Fire and on the Playbook will be appromixately the same kind of regular Android apps that don't use certain Google services or API's.

    I made a simple observation, and you have to make a big deal out of my comment.
    I thought the fire can run any app that is in the amazon marketplace?

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions