Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28
Like Tree4Likes
  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by 65fastback View Post
    Im a business major. my comments have nothing to do with webos.

    my comments are about markets and how much of the market someone has captured. apple continually captures about 20% of a market. theres a reason for that.
    except when they create the market, at which point they are 100% market share.

    the iPod was a new category, not just a new entrant in the mp3 player market. Ipad was a new category, nothing like any 'tablet' or 'pen computing' device that preceded it.

    they are market makers, and open with 100% share.
    sinsin07 likes this.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by 65fastback View Post
    i hate when you cant tell if its sarcasm or not
    Fastback, I confess, it was sarcasm.

    But no way am I going to argue with a real live Business Major! No way to win that one.



    (and that was, too)
  3. #23  
    Another chance to share a rant with HP/Palm (I hope they monitor these forums)….

    But first: I think that the OP is probable correct in that Android’s success came from it being the only viable alternative to the i-factor. Contributing to that were the facts that initially only one carrier had iOS devices and everybody offered Android (hint to HP/Palm here), those devices were (and are) expensive, and Android offered a variety of form factors: physical or virtual keyboard, different screen sizes, etc.; (another hit to HP/Palm here).

    I do think that tablets have a bright future (and that WebOS is perfect for a tablet).

    With really good smart phones now one can, if they want, eliminate the need to carry around another information and media storage device (i-pod touch, Palm Pilot). I do see a place for the smaller “shuffle” type devices for those who want a LARGE music library always with them, and to conserve the phone battery.

    With really good tablets coming out one can, if they want, eliminate the need to carry around a bulky notebook computer. I’m looking forward to going back to a desktop tower which is generally more powerful, more flexible in configuration, upgradeable, and cheaper than a notebook, and using a tablet in the field. Plus I know all kinds of people who use their i-pads to organize and access music, pictures, recipes, calendars, it can just sit on the kitchen counter or the living room coffee table, and they find it much more convenient for those things than using the computer down the hall on a desk. I think tablets are here to stay and are a growth market.

    "Prettier" UIs don't necessarily equal sales. See Touchpad sales.
    TP could position itself, I think, to knock off Android and match i-pad, but they are gonna have to hustle. At my local Wal-Mart (not where I’d buy such a device) they have TP, the i-thing, and the Acer Iconia (Android) display models sitting next to each other. TP is in the middle price wise. Almost everybody has heard of i-pad and when one gets on it is has several “pages” of “things” one seemingly can do with it. It is just a little more expensive than the TP. The Iconia is bulkier and heavier and the interface is NOT pretty but it is $100 less than the TP and likewise has a screen full of “things” one seemingly can do with it. Plus there is a good probability that the shopper looking at it has an Android phone in their pocket and is familiar with its functionality. The TP looks very cool but there are like a dozen little icons on the big 10” landscape (hint to HP/Palm ~ have the “market app” on the demo unit “connect” to a faux internal list so people can get a sense of what’s available). An average consumer may draw the conclusion that it doesn’t do as much as the other two. Actually I think they are right but the TP may do everything they need it to do, and better, but the average consumer probable doesn’t spend hours on forums, so they won’t know that.

    Now for my rant: I need a 4 function PIM, a data base, and an office documents editor, and I need them to sync with my PC without using a cloud. I had these tools with my Palm Tungsten E and TX, with my Blackberry Pearl, with my Palm Pre (1.4.5 with Classic). I have these tools on my Evo 4G and my “rooted” Nook Color 7” Android tablet. I wouldn’t have them, as near as I can tell, on a TP or any newer WebOS phone. I have no doubt that some awesome new WebOS applications are being written as we type. However, I needed those tools yesterday when I went to work, I need them today at work, I will need them tomorrow for work. “Coming soon” won’t work for my work.

    If HP would put Classic on the TP, so that the vast array of full featured and mature PalmOS applications were available, the TP could run circles around the competition, and the arrival of native WebOS applications will just sweeten the deal. IF they would do that I would put the Evo in the desk drawer as my backup phone, reactivate the Pre on the Sprint network (it is still in great shape), and go buy a TP. Until then function has to trump form in my world. And, in the marketplace, until HP/Palm can push some core strategic apps out there, the majority of sales will be to two groups: those who think “tablet” is a synonym for “i-pad” and those who are on a budget and will buy Android, because they think they are getting the same functionality at a lower price (which is true in many respects).
    Tungsten E / dumb phone -> TX / Blackberry Pearl -> Pre (1.4.1.1) -> Evo 4G / rooted Nook Color (with the Pre on the side).
  4. #24  
    self serving.

    at the same price of iPad, none of these tablet will succeed. touchpad included.

    take a look at eee pad sales. that's your answer right there.

    difference is that when one android tablet fails, there will be more others, when touchpad fails, it's all done, unless HP license webOS.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ8 View Post
    Im a School of Hard Knocks major.

    Textbook theories are different than real life experiences. The business model in 2011 is unlike anything ever seen in business to date.

    We'll just agree to disagree.
    its not really text book theories since I also work in the industry...but disagree we can.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    except when they create the market, at which point they are 100% market share.

    the iPod was a new category, not just a new entrant in the mp3 player market. Ipad was a new category, nothing like any 'tablet' or 'pen computing' device that preceded it.

    they are market makers, and open with 100% share.
    they were not new categories. Just because car makers added automatic transmissions and air conditioning in the 1950's doesnt mean those cars were a "new category"...they were mearly an improvement on a category already created.

    just because apple added a scroll wheel to an mp3 player doesnt mean they invented some new category.

    i REALLY dont think we give apple nuts enough credit. while I find them obnoxious and annoying....they truly drive that company beyond anything else in the industry. there is something to be said for that. the most similar thing would be the ps3/xbox fans....nothing else will do and the one they choose is the best and they'll always buy it. for example, im a playstation fan-boi....it dont matter if the ps4 comes out and blows chunks, imma still own it and I'll still believe its the best/coolest.

    i believe we give apple too much credit and their fans not near enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    Fastback, I confess, it was sarcasm.

    But no way am I going to argue with a real live Business Major! No way to win that one.



    (and that was, too)
    haha nice
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)
  6. #26  
    thats like saying the jeep was just another car, or that the segway was just another skateboard. They created a new category and essentially put the old category out of it's misery. I had many of the original mp3 player, such as the Diamond. In fact, I think I still have a Rio 500 in the basement. The only similarity is the mp3 format. I dont own apple gear, or really care to, but it deserves it's place as having created most of the categories it dominates... And one or two that it didn't... Like the newton.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    thats like saying the jeep was just another car, or that the segway was just another skateboard. They created a new category and essentially put the old category out of it's misery. I had many of the original mp3 player, such as the Diamond. In fact, I think I still have a Rio 500 in the basement. The only similarity is the mp3 format. I dont own apple gear, or really care to, but it deserves it's place as having created most of the categories it dominates... And one or two that it didn't... Like the newton.
    so then question for you

    why are they called....mp3 players, tablets, smart phones.....are those not categories?

    to go along with your jeep....jeeps would be in the "suv" category....sports cars, trucks, suv's, etc. all categories.

    now, has apple dominated some categories? sure. created them....no.
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by susanoo26 View Post
    I wonder if you truly believe this logic, or you are just kidding.

    1. The tablet market has been established and its here to stay. See iPad sales.

    2. Google has an ecosystem (similar but not as strong as Apple's) that people have already bought into. See Android sales.

    3. "Touchpad will grow because as it UI is much prettier and the device is more easier to use than Android" Many reviewers think the Playbook has outdone the Touchpad at its own game when it comes to "prettier" and ease of use. "Prettier" UIs don't necessarily equal sales. See Touchpad sales.
    I just can't see buying a Tablet that requires that I own the activated phone in order to e-mail and use a calendar. I could see an Android device being considered better, but not a device that requires absolute dependency on it's other product in order to be of productivity use.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions