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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI.

    Take care,

    Jay

    HTC Evo 4G First Android Tablet to Support Netflix. Why?


    By David Murphy ARTICLE DATE: 06.25.11

    HTC Evo View 4G First Android Tablet to Support Netflix. Why?

    Here comes the HTC Evo 4G! And it's packing a lot of firsts for its debut on Sprint yesterday: The tablet is Sprint's first Android tablet to hit the market, period. It's also the first tablet that's set up to work with the company's 4G WiMax network—around 5 Mbps downloads and 950 Kbps uploads, based on PCMag.com's testing.

    Most importantly—for movie buffs—the HTC Evo 4G is the first tablet to ship with built-in support for Netflix movie and video streaming. In doing so, it joins an exclusive club of Android devices that support the service: A sad list that's currently limited to just five Android smartphones.

    So what's the deal? Are other Android-equipped devices—both phones and tablets—just too slow to run Netflix? Not necessarily. Although a Sprint spokeswoman did confirm in an interview with Wired that the company performed a plenty of testing to ensure that Netflix streaming would proceed smoothly across the company's network.

    The more realistic answer as to why you can't yet get Netflix on, say, a Motorola Xoom tablet is the ugly monster that often rears its head whenever Android upgrades are discussed: Fragmentation. In the case of Netflix, the company has to perform extra research and configuration to ensure that the digital rights management systems it employs work across a number of Android devices. And that's not just a work-once, works-everywhere kind of proposal.

    "Setting aside the debate around the value of content protection and DRM, they are requirements we must fulfill in order to obtain content from major studios for our subscribers to enjoy," wrote Netflix's Greg Peters in a November 2010 blog post. "Although we don't have a common platform security mechanism and DRM, we are able to work with individual handset manufacturers to add content protection to their devices. Unfortunately, this is a much slower approach and leads to a fragmented experience on Android, in which some handsets will have access to Netflix and others won't."

    And if you think issues of fragmentation are just constrained to Netflix, think again. Even Hulu hasn't been able to get its Hulu Plus streaming app up-and-running on an Android tablet. The company's streaming television launched supporting a total of six Android smartphones, and there's no indication of what the timeline might be to bring the service to these devices' larger cousins.

    But even though you might cheer at the Netflix support of HTC's Evo 4G, the service comes with its own price: The HTC Evo 4G ships with the older "Gingerbread" release of Android, or 2.3—an upgrade to Honeycomb, or 3.0, is expected to arrive via a future software update. But at least you can stream movies while you wait?
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2.    #2  
    Hi all.

    here is more info.

    Take care,

    Jay

    First 4G Android Tablet With Netflix Launches on Outdated OS
    By Mike Isaac June 24, 2011 | 2:39 pm

    First 4G Android Tablet With Netflix Launches on Outdated OS | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

    It’s a big day of firsts for Sprint. The carrier launched its first Android tablet on Friday compatible with the new 4G “Wi-Max” network. The device is also the first Android tablet out there capable of running Netflix.

    Unfortunately, despite being first in line for 4G and Netflix, Sprint’s HTC Evo View tablet ships with the older version of Android: 2.3 (Gingerbread), not version 3.0 (Honeycomb). A future software update will bring Honeycomb, the version of Android made specifically for tablets, to the device.

    That speaks to a larger problem of “fragmentation” on Android devices: the inability to implement the platform consistently across multiple types of hardware made by different manufacturers. Fragmentation is also the key reason why Android tablets have been slow getting popular video-streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu onto its devices. It presents a problem for making sure that Digital Rights Management technologies — or applications that make sure you aren’t ripping and recording any of the streaming content you’re watching — function across all devices.

    “It’s not one type of gas that goes into every vehicle,” said Netflix head of communications Steve Swasey, in an interview. “DRM isn’t consistent across all Android devices, and unlike the iPad and iOS devices, there’s not one universal solution to it.”

    Nonetheless, the HTC Evo View 4G’s compatibility with Wi-Max will be significant for those who want to watch streaming media on their tablet devices, as the speed boost you’ll get moving from a 3G device to 4G is considerable.

    The even better news for movie buffs: Unlike the multiple Android tablets that have already hit the market this year, it’s the first Android tablet to run Netflix at launch. The device will essentially come pre-bundled with the Netflix app (after a minor software update upon first powering up the tablet). As of today, only five Android phones are officially capable of running the Netflix app.

    “This is a result of extensive testing of the Netflix app on the product to make sure it works smoothly on our network,” a Sprint spokeswoman told Wired.com.

    Most tablets released in 2011 so far fall into two categories: Wi-Fi only, the type of device most manufacturers launch first, and a 3G or 3.5G networked device, like the original Samsung Galaxy Tab (on Sprint’s 3G network) or T-Mobile’s G-Slate (which is 3.5G at best). HTC introduced the Flyer, the Evo View’s Wi-Fi-only predecessor, in late May.

    Under the hood, the Evo View 4G is no slouch. The tablet sports a 1.5-GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, a gig of ram, front and back-facing cameras and a 7-inch 1024×600 screen. It’s also got a stylus pen, which (for a limited time) will be thrown in for free if you buy a two-year contract.

    In addition to the Evo View tablet, Sprint also launched the Evo 3D, HTC’s first 3-D-video-capable Android smartphone. The Evo View and Evo 3D are both available in Sprint and Best Buy stores as well as online, for $400 and $200 respectively, if purchased in conjunction with a two-year contract.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  3. #3  
    interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if Android fragmentation hurt the chances or delays of these apps coming to webOS. Sure the future promises to bring parity to all webOS devices, but it might be more cost effective to focus on bringing Netflix to Android than the touchpad right now.

    Netflix resources aren't being split between iOS, Android, WebOS, etc, its more like iOS, samsung, motorola, HTC, etc... all of whom have a bigger installed base than webOS.
    Last edited by Mhunterjr; 06/26/2011 at 01:21 PM.
  4.    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if Android fragmentation hurt the chances or delays of these apps coming to webOS. Sure the future promises to bring parity to all webOS devices, but it might be more cost effective to focus on bringing Netflix to Android than the touchpad right now.

    Netflix resources aren't being split between iOS, Android, WebOS, etc, its more like iOS, samsung, motorola, HTC, etc... all of whom have a bigger installed base than webOS.
    Hi,

    I just can't remember which new device was put up for sale a short while ago, that had 'Droid OS that was not one version ago, but two versions ago and couldn't be upgraded.

    I hope that HP realizes the grave series of errors Google made with Android OS:
    1. The allowed too many firms to make too many devices
    2. Those devices run too much of a price differential
    3. They allow new devices to be released using older versions of Android OS that can't even be upgraded.
    4. They allowed too many firms to use the Android platform
    5. They allowed firms to customize the OS instead of building the devices to work to ALL of the standards Google wanted.
    (This list is not exhausted, if anyone has any others items to add to it, please feel free to).

    Now you have a slew of Android tablet computers that can't run Netflix when a few can....if nothing else they have confused the customer so they have turned the customer off of the OS altogether.

    Keep in mind my Tech knowledge is finite so unless I am mistaken, even if many of these devices that CAN'T play Netflix had their OS updated, they still couldn't play Netflix due to the inner workings and settings of the on-board processors.

    I posted one or two articles the other day indicating that the marketplace is so over-saturated with Android devices that the customer is so overwhelmed they no longer can really see the differences between a cheap Android smartphone and a high end one.

    This could be a very GOOD thing for webOS & HP. Even if HP does licence out webOS...I'm sure they are carefully studding the confused mess Android OS has become....no wonder what the 'droid OS isn't making a dent into iOS & the iPad.

    take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if Android fragmentation hurt the chances or delays of these apps coming to webOS. Sure the future promises to bring parity to all webOS devices, but it might be more cost effective to focus on bringing Netflix to Android than the touchpad right now.

    Netflix resources aren't being split between iOS, Android, WebOS, etc, its more like iOS, samsung, motorola, HTC, etc... all of whom have a bigger installed base than webOS.
    Simple, only make Netflix for Enyo. Isn't that they OS for the Touchpad and Pre 3? If you don't have an Enyo device, tough luck.
  6.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if Android fragmentation hurt the chances or delays of these apps coming to webOS. Sure the future promises to bring parity to all webOS devices, but it might be more cost effective to focus on bringing Netflix to Android than the touchpad right now.

    Netflix resources aren't being split between iOS, Android, WebOS, etc, its more like iOS, samsung, motorola, HTC, etc... all of whom have a bigger installed base than webOS.
    Hi all,

    HP has repeatedly stated that they would help write and/or port apps from other platforms to webOS. If the app can technically work on webOS I wouldn't be surprised that HP financially helps the app happen!

    I'm sure that is how many of the 300 apps at roll out happened..that is with some work and/or funds from HP!

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  7. #7  
    There is no Fragmentation in Android Tablets running honeycomb. The Honeycomb tablets all run the same basic spec requirements with the only difference being screen size. The only reson why the Evo View got it first was beacuse HTC decided to put out a giant phone which was easier to make an app for since most android phones have netflix its just porting app to a slightly larger screen. No tweaking the UI or making a dedicated version of tablets.
  8. samab's Avatar
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    #8  
    The TouchPad lacking the HDMI port actually help them to get netflix sooner --- because there is one less anti-piracy technology they have to port.
  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    The TouchPad lacking the HDMI port actually help them to get netflix sooner --- because there is one less anti-piracy technology they have to port.
    Hi,

    Good Point...makes me wonder if that's why they left one off in the first place...Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  10. #10  
    While the fragmenting has not hurt the phone market that much, it was mostly because the apps were not that awful difficult to port from one device to another at least eventually. That changed with netflix (and hulu). With these only a few phones are ever going to work with the app and there has been much anguish from those that can't get them.

    And this already seems to have an even bigger impact on the android tablets since many of the phone apps don't work well on the tablets already.

    HP does have a chance to hit the "middle spot" they are talking about, combining homebrew customization with a single platform that developers can write for.
  11.    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by midmofan View Post
    HP does have a chance to hit the "middle spot" they are talking about, combining homebrew customization with a single platform that developers can write for.
    Hi,

    As my Grandmother used to say, "Your lips to G-D's ears".

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  12. samab's Avatar
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    #12  
    Homebrew and enterprise may not mix well.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by shingi_70 View Post
    There is no Fragmentation in Android Tablets running honeycomb. The Honeycomb tablets all run the same basic spec requirements with the only difference being screen size. The only reson why the Evo View got it first was beacuse HTC decided to put out a giant phone which was easier to make an app for since most android phones have netflix its just porting app to a slightly larger screen. No tweaking the UI or making a dedicated version of tablets.
    Wrong.

    DRM is both software AND hardware.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Wrong.

    DRM is both software AND hardware.
    All the honeycomb tablets have simlar hardware due to system requirments.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by shingi_70 View Post
    All the honeycomb tablets have simlar hardware due to system requirments.
    But they all (for the most part) have different CPUs/GPUs which is hardware side of the DRM.

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