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  1.    #1  
    Nokia Unveils
    Slim-Line Version
    Of Top-End Handset

    By DAVID PRINGLE
    Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    September 8, 2004; Page D5

    Nokia Corp., the world's largest mobile-phone maker, Wednesday unveiled a slim-line version of its top-end Communicator handset, which some in the industry jokingly call the "brick."

    The new Nokia 9300, which is both a phone and a personal organizer, is aimed at business users and will face off against rival hybrid devices from companies such as Hewlett-Packard Co., palmOne Inc., Motorola Inc. and Research In Motion Ltd., maker of the BlackBerry. The gizmo, scheduled to go on sale early next year world-wide, is a further sign of the mounting competition in the market for mobile phones that can double as miniature computers.

    The new device also is designed to step up Nokia's push into the business market, part of a wider bid by the Finland-based giant to jump-start its sales after several years of treading water. Company officials say the Nokia 9300 will be priced at about $785 to $845 before any subsidies by cellphone-service providers.


    Nokia's new Communicator, the Nokia 9300


    As with previous Nokia Communicators, the new device looks like a phone, but can be turned on its side and opened up like a laptop to reveal a full keyboard and a wide color display. Instead of a touch-sensitive screen, the device is controlled using the keyboard and a circular keypad that moves a cursor across the screen. The Nokia 9300 weighs less than six ounces, compared with 8.6 ounces for the most recent Communicator, an aging device that has been on the market since 2002 and suffered the brick barb. The first Nokia Communicator was launched in 1996.

    Until now, Nokia Communicators have attracted a dedicated, but small, following among business users who have typically used them as miniature laptops.

    Niklas Savander, senior vice president of Nokia Enterprise Solutions' Mobile Device unit, says the Nokia 9300 should appeal to a wider audience than its predecessors because it is light and small enough to be regarded as a conventional cellphone when closed.

    In addition to calendar, address book and other organizer software, the Nokia 9300 can surf the Web and download e-mails via cellphone networks. But it lacks one key feature -- it can't connect to the short-range Wi-Fi, or wireless fidelity, networks. Motorola, H-P and others have incorporated Wi-Fi radios into rival devices.

    Nokia plans to roll out a version of the Communicator that incorporates Wi-Fi and a built-in camera in November. But this device, the Nokia 9500, weighs 7.8 ounces, significantly more than the Nokia 9300. H-P's iPAQ device weighs 6.7 ounces.

    Some buyers also may be put off by the Nokia 9300's Series 80 software. Series 80 was developed by Nokia to run on top of software from Symbian Ltd., a London-based consortium part-owned by Nokia. Series 80 isn't widely used in the business market, but Mr. Savander says most major business programs have been adapted to run on top of the system. Nokia is trying to establish Symbian's software as the standard means of controlling high-end handsets, but faces a challenge from Microsoft Corp.

    Write to David Pringle at david.pringle@wsj.com
    Off to iPhone land...
  2. orol's Avatar
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    4 Posts
    #2  
    nokia 9300 is waaay better then treo 650.

    why ? well it looks like regular phone and you can use it as regular phone. if you need the comunicator part you can take advantage of full keyboard and great display with resolution 640x200 pixels. something you cannot beat.

    and them some other advantages as 80mb memory and MULTITASKING!!!!
  3. #3  
    If it's brick size and doesn't let me look up contacts by typing the first few letters, it's got a few strikes against it. It maybe be twice the pixels wide, but 120 pixels less on the vertical. Where's CDMA, and how to you type any letters with one hand. Also it costs significantly more. No mention of MP3 or camera in the article - does it have those?

    I'm not knocking it completely, but saying that it appears to have some trade-offs, many of which are deal-killers for Treo users. It's not all pluses across the board against the Treo.
  4. Iceman6's Avatar
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    #4  
    The wide screen makes it much better for web browsing, but the price is that it's huuuge! Huuuuge is not better, it's worse. Also, the keyboard doesn't look like it's designed for thumb typing, but that's all you can do on it. Interesting, though.
  5. #5  
    I viewed the demo and they show someone using it with there thumbs. I like it alot but there is no camera. OHHHHH but the 9500 kick *** and takes name. This beast is awesome. It has everything. It may weight more but I may hold off getting the Treo 650 to get the 9500.
    Last edited by BssinRVer; 09/08/2004 at 03:55 PM.
  6. #6  
    How much is the 9500 going to be?
  7. #7  
    If this is anything like Nokia's last communicator (I can never remember Nokia model numbers), I'll sit this one out. I remember been very excited about the previous model when looking at it on the web. Then one day I saw it in the real world and all I could think was, "What a brick!" It looked more like a universal remote than a cell phone. Unless the size has been reduced by at least 50%, in no way can anyone seriously claim that "it looks like a regular phone."
  8. #8  
    Others are saying that the size is of the Nokia 6310(?). Being an ex-Nokia 9210 Communicator user, this significant reduction is great. The only challenge is using the keyboard without a flat surface on. I normally have to sit down when I have to use the qwerty keyboard. But, without a flat surface, it might be preferable to use the numeric keypad. However, with the reduction in size, this should be doable. The reason I got attracted with the Communicator is the bundled Office software.

    Now, I really have to examine closely which way I will go- Treo 650 or Nokia 9300.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by bmacfarland
    If it's brick size and doesn't let me look up contacts by typing the first few letters, it's got a few strikes against it. It maybe be twice the pixels wide, but 120 pixels less on the vertical.

    Engadget posted some very good pics comparing the 9300 to it's behmouth older sibling 9500:

    http://www.engadget.com/entry/1400631295339375/

    Size-wise, it seems like a big improvement over the 9500 and 9210 imo. I especially like the fact that 9300 can fold out completely flat which makes it much easier to enter text and for viewing. The problem is that this thing will be uber expensive and it still large compared to other smartphones. Also, it doesn't have the cam and wifi that the 9500 have making it less desirable over the Treo Ace for example....
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  10. #10  
    Is the 9500 out yet? Yall talk as though you have handled it and it is too big and is like a brick?
  11. eugarps's Avatar
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    #11  
    Nokia is saying Q4 for the 9500. It's strong points seem to be BT and WiFi. I think it'll be bigger competition for the iPAQ 6315.
    Best,

    Bill
    ><(((((`>
    Palm Treo Pro, iPhone 3G 16GB Refurb, Palm TX
    Waiting for Pre GSM!
  12. #12  
    Why would it be more competition for the IPaq and not the 650?
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by BssinRVer
    Why would it be more competition for the IPaq and not the 650?
    Here's a perspective from someone who plans to jump from the Treo 270 to one of the following: the h6315, the MXp, or one of these Nokias. This market segment is directed at ("power"/business) users who expect the latest hardware options, bundled office suites, replaceable power supplies, and highly reliable products. I see the Treo as an excellent phone-intensive devise (the move to a candybar form was part of this), whereas the other segment is PDA-intensive.
    You may be right; I may be crazy. But, the Treo may be just the device I've been looking for.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by bmacfarland
    No mention of MP3 or camera in the article - does it have those?
    No camera or wi-fi for the 9300. As it says above, the larger 9500 is the one that comes with both of those.
    Sound: MP3, MPEG4 (AAC), RealAudio, and MIDI support;
    Video: RealVideo, MPEG4, and H.263 (a low-bitrate encoding solution for videoconferencing)
    You may be right; I may be crazy. But, the Treo may be just the device I've been looking for.
  15. #15  
    Here are a couple of other excellent sources: http://www.brighthand.com/article/No...0_Communicator

    and here: http://www.nokia.com/nokia/0,,60764,00.html (be sure to check out the "Spotlight" presentation and the Nokia 610 car kit phone accessory here)
    You may be right; I may be crazy. But, the Treo may be just the device I've been looking for.

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