Results 1 to 12 of 12
Like Tree11Likes
  • 5 Post By TJs11thPre
  • 2 Post By horzel
  • 1 Post By tullius128
  • 2 Post By carldc
  • 1 Post By GoJoe2
  1. GoJoe2's Avatar
    Posts
    133 Posts
    Global Posts
    172 Global Posts
       #1  
    ... bought a Nokia E7.

    And I bought in the last months a Sony Ericsson X2 and a palm Centro and even a Siemens SK65!!

    Now, guess what I'm doing?

    And do have any of you suggestions for other items I should not miss?

    Best to all of you - best mobile OS community ever!
  2. #2  
    << I just..................... moved this thread to the proper forum >>
    Last edited by HelloNNNewman; 01/07/2015 at 10:06 AM.
  3. #3  
    an HTC or Palm (maybe Samsung) Windows Mobile device would go nicely with that.
    maybe an original Palm Pre
    a Lumia 800 or 520
    ...
    m505 > Z|71 > T|C > T|T3 > LifeDrive > iPod touch 4 >
    Pre 2 > Treo Pro > Aria > Treo 650 > Lumia 920 > BB Z10 > BB Q10
    Lumia 830 > 635 > iPhone 5s > Galaxy Alpha > Lumia 640 >
    iPhone 5c > Nexus 5 > Nexus 5X > Blackberry Priv
    My Palm OS Archive
  4. #4  
    I just...












    ... fell for Vague Thread Title trap.

    D'oh!
    Sporting my 13th Pre device, a NOS unlocked ROW Pre3!
  5. #5  
    Son of a gun!
  6. #6  
    I just....




    Found my HP Omnigo!

    Yes this is not the first time HP was not able to create a successtory with a mobile platform.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre3 using Forums
    TJs11thPre and xandros9 like this.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by horzel View Post
    I just....




    Found my HP Omnigo!

    Yes this is not the first time HP was not able to create a successtory with a mobile platform.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre3 using Forums
    Unhh! That one hurt even 15 years later. I still have scars from buying 300 licenses to GEOS (the Omnigo OS/GUI) for resale. Now there's a rabid, diehard fan-base. These folks are still playing with a DOS-based system that will run on an Intel 286 cpu with next to no memory: http://www.breadbox.com. Actually a pretty amazing piece of engineering. If RAM and hard drive space hadn't become so cheap GEOS might have beaten Windows.
    horzel likes this.
  8. carldc's Avatar
    Posts
    441 Posts
    Global Posts
    508 Global Posts
    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by tullius128 View Post
    Unhh! That one hurt even 15 years later. I still have scars from buying 300 licenses to GEOS (the Omnigo OS/GUI) for resale. Now there's a rabid, diehard fan-base. These folks are still playing with a DOS-based system that will run on an Intel 286 cpu with next to no memory: http://www.breadbox.com. Actually a pretty amazing piece of engineering. If RAM and hard drive space hadn't become so cheap GEOS might have beaten Windows.
    Blast from the past! Geoworks/New Deal on top of DOS was my main OS for several years. I still have the New Deal box with the installation floppies. I did a good deal of my grad. school research on an IBM PS/2-25 using Geoworks.
    horzel and tullius128 like this.
  9. #9  
    Sony ericcson Xperia X1, love the keyboard and design.
    Nokia N9, Nokia N900, Nokia N8, Nokia 808, Nokia e90
    Jolla Jolla
    Handspring 180g...

    Don't get me started lol
    Smartphones: Nokia 5230 > Palm Pre 2 > Nokia 701 (returned) > HP Pre 3 > BB Z10 (save me from it) + HP Touchpad
    Cars: 1993 Subaru Impreza AWD > 2007 Saab 9-3 2.0T


    LinkedIn: Matthew Mers
    Twitter: MatthewMers
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mattmers View Post
    Handspring 180g...

    Don't get me started lol
    Mine still works...
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by mattmers View Post
    Sony ericcson Xperia X1, love the keyboard and design.
    Nokia N9, Nokia N900, Nokia N8, Nokia 808, Nokia e90
    Jolla Jolla
    Handspring 180g...

    Don't get me started lol
    Love mine... best keyboard ever
    ...
  12. GoJoe2's Avatar
    Posts
    133 Posts
    Global Posts
    172 Global Posts
       #12  
    Sorry for the vague thread title. I want to start a discussion on the history of mobile operation systems for smartphones and thought I start it by a little riddle. The discussion is heading exactly in the direction I hoped, thx!

    So whatís it all about? After having bought my Pre3 back in 2011 and reading more closely all the news regarding webOS and its demise it got me thinking. Didnít we witness in 2011 Nokias ditching of Symbian in favor of Windows Phone? Wasnít it Microsoft itself who killed Windows Mobile in 2010 to switch to Windows Phone 7, which still had a Windows CE core, and finally to Windows Phone 8, which hasnít to do anything with Windows CE and the Microsofts mobileOS past? And it was in the fall of 2011 that Blackberry / RIM announced that they wouldnít develop BlackberryOS (7) any further and instead switch to Blackberry10.

    So it seems that the year 2011 is a turning point in smartphone OS history and this got me thinking even further. How did all that come to be?

    Cut to 2002:
    If you bought a smartphone in 2002 two things there true of you. Firstly, you bought it for work. You certainly didnít buy it just for fun or to carry it around as a fashion item. Secondly, you either bought a model running palm OS, Windows Mobile (then called Pocket PC 2002 Smartphone Edition), a Blackberry with BlackberryOS or a Symbian device (probably a Nokia Communicator or a Sony Ericsson P-series model).
    All you intended to do was to receive and make calls do the same with messages and emails and most importantly manage your day-to-day events and appointments and all your contacts. And you preferably synchronized it with your desktop work environment (and you wanted to access, read and alter company documents). These devices were all equipped to handle this task (one maybe better than the other in certain respects).

    Now fast forward to 2012:
    What do you expect now of a smartphone? Well, you obviously want to make and take calls, messages and emails and the before mentioned rest as well but more overly most people (maybe not you in special) want to listen to music, take pictures, stream video, interact with other people on dozens of social media channels like facebook, twitter etc.

    The work part got less and less important and I think itís the main reason why all of the mentioned breeds of mobile OS got dumped. This is, basically, old news. But I think the effect and importance of that change have been neglected tremendously. Yes, there were some obituaries for Windows Mobile, Symbian, webOS hack even palmOS. But a whole history of business smartphones was never written!
    In the beginning the terms Ďbusinessí and Ďsmartphoneí were mutually inclusive. But that changed somewhere between 2000 and 2010. And yes, you guess correctly it has to do something with a at one point struggling company which today is the most valuable company in the world.

    So whatís my goal with this post:

    Besides putting you up with a lot of reading itís twofold. Firstly, I would like to enumerate the relevant mobile OS and then align this with your experience and opinion. Secondly, this will be the start of a much longer journey as I intend to write a whole book and the rise and demise of business smartphones and their operating systems. But all this will just be hinted at. So let us talk about task one here only.

    When we recollect as some of you will do better than me we are confronted basically with 4 options for business smartphones back in the day. These were as mentioned before: Windows Mobile (as soon as it got established as smartphone variant in 2001/2002), Symbian (from 2000 on), palmOS (from 2001 on) and Blackberry OS (from 2001 on).

    They all had some history. Three of them started out as mobile operating systems for handheld devices which havenít had a phone functionally built in or intended. I think we all know palmOS and its history from 1996 on. Windows Mobile then named Windows CE came to live in (guess what) 1996 as well. And finally Symbian which ran by EPOC made its appearance in 1997 again as a PDA OS (similar to the two above). Blackberry came somewhat later in 1999 and hasnít had the PDA focus like the others. So we see a big similarity not only at the end but also at the beginning.

    Now there is really a lot to say to each of this systems, their incarnations, developers, hardware manufacturers, advantages and disadvantages, heights and lows but I wonít dwell into this because this post is already long enough.

    My last few thoughts:
    I wanted to establish a collection of the last representatives or heralds maybe even heroes of their kind resp. age. So this is where the riddle of the first post comes from.

    I have a Centro which was obviously the last palmOS device.

    I have a Pre3 which was the last webOS device (or so we thought up to a couple of days ago). (webOS wasnít mentioned that much earlier on and indeed it was supposedly the answer to the new more social, more entertainment centric approach to smartphones made popular by Apple Ė so it falls a bit out of the picture regarding business smartphones Ė but itís all there and with Synergy and notifications business usage was taken / could have been taken to a new level as well.)

    I just bought a Nokia E7 which was the last Symbian device for business usage with a physical keyboard (the last Symbian device was the Nokia 808 pureview).

    I got me a Sony Ericsson X2 and though it is not the last Windows Mobile device (launched in February of 2010) it certainly is one of the best (as reviews said and I must second that Ė though there are some drawbacks). And it has clear business orientation. Looking at WinMo there were lots of multimedia smartphones aiming at the IPhone like most of the HTC phones (like the HTC Touch devices, although it was HTC, who paved the way for WinMo with their HTC Wallaby which was released in the US and Europe as the O2 XDA, T-Mobile MDA and so on). The last WinMo device is (to my knowledge) the Samsung Omnia 735 / Samsung B7350 Omnia PRO 4 which got released around October 2010 (it has a business orientation as well). There are other interesting Ďlastí WinMo devices such as the palm Treo Pro, Toshiba K01, HP Glisten (can anyone confirm that that was the last HP WinMo device?), or Sony Ericsson Aspen. But I guess I wonít get one of them.

    Finally I own a Blackberry 9780. So theoretically I still need a Blackberry Bold 9930 or Torch 9860.

    And to come to an end:
    There were several other interesting candidates for such a collection
    - Notably the IBM Simon (1994) which was the first smartphone ever but was obviously way ahead of its time.
    - Then the Siemens Notephone (1994) an interesting hybrid of the Apple Newton with NewtonOS and a normal desktop telephon.
    - Next the already mentioned GEOS which powered the first massively popular smartphone, the Nokia 9000 Communicator (1996)
    - In the same year there was the HP OmniGo 700 LX another hybrid PDA / phone = smartphone solution (Does anyone own such a thing or held it in his hands?). Though the OmniGo 100 series ran GEOS the 200 series (including the OmniGo 700 LX) run a rather unmodified MS-DOS variant
    - Then there are the remnants of GEOS who struggled after losing the Nokia Communicator series, launched two new OS GEOS-SC and GEOS-SE (EdenOS) which both were used in some devices like the Toshiba Genio PCV-100 (1997) and the Mitsubishi Moem-D (1999) (which was probably the last) for the former and the Seiko Epson Locatio series from 1998 to 2000 for the last (though Iím not sure that that model even had phone capability.)

    Do you now more? Iím eager to hear your input, thoughts and experiences on this topic.

    The Nokia Maemo based N900 (thx @ matters for mentioning it), then MeeGo based N9 and now (for argumentative sake) SailfishOS based Jollaphone are yet a completely other but nonetheless hugely interesting mater. They started out as mobile internet devices with which phone manufactures like Nokia tried to enter into the low-end laptop / sub-notebook market (so in the beginning they didn't have phone capability.)

    That's it. I hope your coffee isnít cold by now.

    Again a great deal of thanks to this community! and maybe I got myself wound up in the wrong direction, now that webOS is coming back to handheld - err - armworn devices and palm being resurrected to god knows what (at least sounding interesting).

    Maybe we aren't as dead as we thought we were
    Last edited by GoJoe2; 01/08/2015 at 05:25 AM.
    Remy X likes this.

Posting Permissions