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  1. #21  
    Okay, I was on Windows Phone until I washed it, and then got a replacement windows phone and dropped it, killing it.

    So I was forced to go to Android, and it's fine, but there are a few things that I really miss from Windows Phone. One thing is that if you have a bluetooth headset on, and a text comes in, it will ask you if you want the text read out loud. And you can respond by voice too. All in the OS. No app needed. Great when you have your hands full or are in the car.

    I also really miss the tiles. I wasn't sure about them at first, but now I see how much information you can have at your finger tips in a way that Android does but not as well. And I find my Android widgets just stop working for some reason.

    And I'm one of the few that actually prefers Nokia maps to google maps.

    And there are a few more little touches that WP has that makes it a very pleasing experience. They don't have the really rare, specific apps that are really useful if you're one of the 100 people that use it. But they do have most of the major apps.

    I would say give Windows phone a go if you want to try something different, and you just need basic app functionality.
  2. imurrx's Avatar
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    #22  
    I went from a Pre 2 (a Sprint FrankenPre2 ) and switched to a Motorola Moto X.

    Great phone. Good overall feel in hand. It has a near stock Android install (no bloated skins).

    Best features of the phone are Active Notifications and Open Mic.

    Active notifications is a huge plus for the phone. The screen of the phone is off unless you pick it up and it turns on or it "breathes" and turning on periodically ever minute. When the screen 1st turns on, it goes to the lock screen. If you get an active notification from an app, you can just hold the unlock button on screen to peak into the message. It will display a quick synopsis (the beginning text and who it is from). You can let go to look at it later or swipe down to unlock the phone to the home screen, swipe to the side to dismiss, or swipe up to go right to the message in the application that sent you the notification. Very efficient and clean.

    Open Mic or active Mic, the phone is always listening for "OK Google". One it hears you, you can command the phone to do many things. For example, you can do a Google search. You can verbally set the timer or an alarm clock. You can launch an app, send a text or even call someone for you. You can ask it launch a specific web page or just the weather. Now what sets this apart from other Androids and other systems is that this can be done from any app, screen or state of the phone (must be turned on of course.

    One time I asked it to look up the address from a landscaping supply store, launch Scout (could have done Google maps as well) and on the return trip look up the phone number to a pizza-sub shop and call it for me. This was all done while I was driving with no input from me.

    It is a great phone and I plan to get the next iteration when I can upgrade.
    Let's go LG, be not like HP.

    Qualcom 2700 > Touchpoint Dual Band> Samsung n400> Treo 650> Treo 800w> LG Optimus S> Pre > Franken Pre 2 > Moto X
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by imurrx View Post
    I went from a Pre 2 (a Sprint FrankenPre2 ) and switched to a Motorola Moto X.

    Great phone. Good overall feel in hand. It has a near stock Android install (no bloated skins).

    Best features of the phone are Active Notifications and Open Mic.

    Active notifications is a huge plus for the phone. The screen of the phone is off unless you pick it up and it turns on or it "breathes" and turning on periodically ever minute. When the screen 1st turns on, it goes to the lock screen. If you get an active notification from an app, you can just hold the unlock button on screen to peak into the message. It will display a quick synopsis (the beginning text and who it is from). You can let go to look at it later or swipe down to unlock the phone to the home screen, swipe to the side to dismiss, or swipe up to go right to the message in the application that sent you the notification. Very efficient and clean.

    Open Mic or active Mic, the phone is always listening for "OK Google". One it hears you, you can command the phone to do many things. For example, you can do a Google search. You can verbally set the timer or an alarm clock. You can launch an app, send a text or even call someone for you. You can ask it launch a specific web page or just the weather. Now what sets this apart from other Androids and other systems is that this can be done from any app, screen or state of the phone (must be turned on of course.

    One time I asked it to look up the address from a landscaping supply store, launch Scout (could have done Google maps as well) and on the return trip look up the phone number to a pizza-sub shop and call it for me. This was all done while I was driving with no input from me.

    It is a great phone and I plan to get the next iteration when I can upgrade.
    Do you really have to say "okay google ", that is so silly. What happens if you just say what you want?
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by laingman View Post
    Do you really have to say "okay google ", that is so silly. What happens if you just say what you want?
    As I understand it 'OK Google' is the trigger for it to know you are talking to it and not just in a discussion with someone. Some phones have used a button you have to press but Google went for a verbal trigger so it is completely hands free. Personally I cannot imagine a circumstance where I would want to talk to my phone so I don't use it.

    I just made the plunge a couple of weeks ago from my Pre3 to a Nexus 5 and I am very happy with my choice. The raw Google OS is so much better than the messed up version on HTC and Samsung devices though even they are improving these days.

    I've just installed an app to do universal search called AndroSearch which seems to be a good replacement for JustType, pulling up contacts,apps, references in documents titles and content (including PDFs) and online searches. Maybe not quite as powerful or configurable but does a pretty good impersonation and always available from the notification bar.

    Overall I am pretty happy with my choice, the thing I miss most is the physical keyboard but I am getting used to it.
  5. #25  
    I had a Nokia Lumia 520 for a few days, which I bought for my father, and had to learn to explain to him. Really nice phone. The maps app IS great and the Zune-ish interface is simple and pretty easy to set up how you like it. There are a ton more apps than webOS (obviously), but fewer than android or iOS.

    There were a few little things that irked me (the way XBox Music catalogs music was one -- it constantly messes up albums; several swipes and links to get to the battery percentage was another), but Windows Phone also has this great feature that is rarely mentioned: it has this incredible predictive text feature. When you start typing a sentence, choices for the next word show up as soon as you complete a word. And the choices are insanely good. You can type entire sentences, as you intended, just by choosing from the list of suggestions. It's very fast and convenient. That single feature alone would probably win me over, if I had to give up my physical keyboard.
    IIIxe | z22 | Pre 3 | Bold 9900 | Q10 | Nexus 4
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by andyhurley View Post
    As I understand it 'OK Google' is the trigger for it to know you are talking to it and not just in a discussion with someone. Some phones have used a button you have to press but Google went for a verbal trigger so it is completely hands free. Personally I cannot imagine a circumstance where I would want to talk to my phone so I don't use it.

    I just made the plunge a couple of weeks ago from my Pre3 to a Nexus 5 and I am very happy with my choice. The raw Google OS is so much better than the messed up version on HTC and Samsung devices though even they are improving these days.

    I've just installed an app to do universal search called AndroSearch which seems to be a good replacement for JustType, pulling up contacts,apps, references in documents titles and content (including PDFs) and online searches. Maybe not quite as powerful or configurable but does a pretty good impersonation and always available from the notification bar.

    Overall I am pretty happy with my choice, the thing I miss most is the physical keyboard but I am getting used to it.
    What about speed dial. Does it have that and how does it work?
  7. #27  
    Blackberry 10 is the OS that's closest to webOS.

    It's multitasking is the most similar (still inferior though). It's gestures are more similar.

    That said, all of the phone OSes are very capable. But if you go Android / iOS and get used to having access to the huge library of apps, it's hard to switch to BB10 or Windows Phone since you'll likely have to give up a few of the apps you had gotten used to using.

    I went from the Pre- to the Galaxy S2. In that switch I really missed webOS (the multitasking and notifications), but I loved the app library of Android and the fact that the hardware flat out embarrassed the Pre-. It was much faster, better built, front facing camera, and the rear camera quality was excellent. The screen was very bright and colorful. And the fact that compared to webOS Android was much smoother and responsive also helped.

    I then went from the S2 to a Blackberry Z10. I liked getting multitasking back and I like the gestures. I'm missing the apps. BB10 can use Android apps, but like 25% of them still don't work, and that includes many of the good ones. And the ones that do work don't quite run as well. (If you go into the Blackberry forums you'll get fanboys telling you how BB10 runs Android apps better than Android. Those people are flat out lying.)

    I have a Windows tablet and Windows is actually a pretty nice OS, but it's lacking in apps. Coming from webOS you won't miss it (since webOS has even fewer) though.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by laingman View Post
    What about speed dial. Does it have that and how does it work?
    I'm not certain about the best way to do this but that is probably my knowledge that is lacking - I actually created contacts links on my home screen (grouped under one icon) but I no longer need this because the updated dialer in 4.4.3 (which came out last week) includes shortcut buttons to the most common and recently dialed numbers which does the job for me. It allows you to see (by name if they are in your contacts) the previous calls and dial them directly or choose from other numbers for the same contact. You can also choose to text that contact instead all from the dialer. It's all a bit different from the way it worked in WebOS but it seems to have pretty much the same functionality.

    Also in the same dialer update you can now directly view all your contacts so you don't have to remember to open contacts.

    I still prefer WebOS but Android has the advantage of being fully supported and I can now see my work emails without carrying an additional device (Good - which only exists on iOS and Android). Not to mention all the other apps that are not supported on WebOS.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by spacemanspork View Post
    Blackberry 10 is the OS that's closest to webOS.

    It's multitasking is the most similar (still inferior though). It's gestures are more similar.

    That said, all of the phone OSes are very capable. But if you go Android / iOS and get used to having access to the huge library of apps, it's hard to switch to BB10 or Windows Phone since you'll likely have to give up a few of the apps you had gotten used to using.

    I went from the Pre- to the Galaxy S2. In that switch I really missed webOS (the multitasking and notifications), but I loved the app library of Android and the fact that the hardware flat out embarrassed the Pre-. It was much faster, better built, front facing camera, and the rear camera quality was excellent. The screen was very bright and colorful. And the fact that compared to webOS Android was much smoother and responsive also helped.

    I then went from the S2 to a Blackberry Z10. I liked getting multitasking back and I like the gestures. I'm missing the apps. BB10 can use Android apps, but like 25% of them still don't work, and that includes many of the good ones. And the ones that do work don't quite run as well. (If you go into the Blackberry forums you'll get fanboys telling you how BB10 runs Android apps better than Android. Those people are flat out lying.)

    I have a Windows tablet and Windows is actually a pretty nice OS, but it's lacking in apps. Coming from webOS you won't miss it (since webOS has even fewer) though.
    I also ended up moving to BB10. My first smartphone was a BlackBerry so it seemed like a good progression. The multitasking is great but not as fluid or natural as webOS's cards. The hub is awesome. Much better than notifications on iOS or Android. The keyboard on the Z10 is the best out there. The camera is awesome with every feature you could imagine (10.3 adds panorama mode and time lapse). Having a gesture based OS just makes so much more sense than physical buttons or tapping everywhere.

    I'm currently running the latest 10.3 OS leak and it keeps getting better and better. The app solution has improved a lot since I first got my BlackBerry Z10 back in January. There are native apps for almost everything I use on a daily basis now and most of the games I enjoy. The native Instagram, SnapChat, Twitter, WhatsApp, and Vine clients are better than the original apps.

    With Snap side-loaded the Google Play store is available even paid apps. 10.3 upgrades the Android runtime to 4.3 and is much faster than it was on 10.2.1. Android apps take a few seconds to open but once they are running they are just as fast as native apps - even games. Between both app stores only a few apps are missing (Android apps that require Google Play services won't work but most of those have Native apps anyways). I think the only app I would like but am missing is Google Hangouts and that's not a big deal to me.

    I miss a lot about webOS though. Nothing feels as natural or intuitive. When webOS had apps they were usually awesome. ComicShelf, FeedSpider, (homebrew) Google Maps, Music Player Remix, Project Macaw, TapNote still are better for their functions than anything BB10 offers. I miss inductive charging (I realize QI charging is an option for some phones), swiping to close apps, the elegant Palm hardware designs, Touch to Share, and the awesome homebrew community. I still mess around with my Pre3 often and my TouchPad Go is still my tablet although I'll admit having the Z10 with it's awesome browser and LTE makes me need it less often these days. It's always on the Touchstone running when not being used though with Flixi running which is a great use for it.
    Last edited by cbosdell; 06/09/2014 at 02:57 PM.
    Devices: Pre3 16GB (AT&T - webOS 2.2.4) | White TouchPad 4G 32GB (AT&T - webOS 3.0.5 + LunaCE)
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