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    T-Mobile securing Android phones with Good | Security - InfoWorld

    T-Mobile securing Android phones with Good

    T-Mobile is hoping to make it easier for businesses to use Android phones by reselling secure e-mail services from Good Technology.

    Good Technology's platform includes software on the phone, a server that resides in the business and the Good network operations center. The system allows end users to securely access corporate information like email.

    [ iPhone, BlackBerry, or Android? Whatever handheld you use or manage, turn to InfoWorld for the latest developments. Subscribe to InfoWorld's Mobilize newsletter today. ]

    The phone software is available for all Android phones and tablets that T-Mobile sells, said Marc Rohleder, director of business sales engineering for T-Mobile.

    Some businesses may want to buy the system from T-Mobile, rather than directly from Good, because they have an existing relationship with the operator, he said. "A lot of our customers want to purchase this directly from their carrier partner in order to have it on the same bill, so it's an easier transaction," he said. Customers pay a licensing fee for the software based on how many people are using it.

    The phone software is available in the Android Market so workers who already have Android devices can simply download it from there. They then activate the service via a code provided by the IT administrator.

    The offering should appeal to businesses that are feeling pressure from workers who want more choice of phones and who want to use their own phones to access corporate information, Rohleder said.

    "Up until Android came out a few years ago, most enterprises that needed security were using BlackBerry devices. Now, with the amazing selection and technology you can get from Android, all their employees are demanding they have a different set of selections," he said.

    While Android includes Exchange Active Sync, it doesn't support all of its security policies, many of which IT security departments require, he said. "In the past, they were in this difficult situation where employees wanted to use Android but the policies couldn't support it," he said.

    In addition, some workers don't have a corporate-sponsored phone service but still want to use their personal phones to be productive, he said. With Good, IT departments can allow them to securely access corporate information from their personal phones. If an employees leaves the company, the Good Technology lets IT administrators wipe only corporate information from the phone.

    The Good Technology system also supports iPhones and iPads.
    Unlocked Pre 2 from UK Ebay.
  2. #2  
    This has signs of desperation from Good all over it.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  3. #3  
    This is actually a pretty hand feature to be able to whiping only the corporate information instead of only having the option of wiping the whole phone!

    I think this is one more nail in blackberry's coffin.

    Although I do agree that Good probably isn't doing the best so this is a give and take relationship with t-mobile.

    I wonder if HP will implement similar technology if they are going after the enterprise market. I mean I know it already support exchange features but for them to offer an add-on administrator kit that offers more fine tuning of controls I think would be very beneficial.
  4. #4  
    Funny you mention Good, this was on Engadget today:
    Apple tops Android in enterprise; little green robot still gunning for corner office

    And this was on AllThingsD yesterday:
    iPad Trouncing Android in Enterprise

    Both are about Good.
  5. #5  
    Good is experiencing declining market share, just like RIM is. Both of their business models are under attack from the very platforms they are designed to work with in a supporting role: Exchange and smartphones. As Exchange gets better and more secure along with the smartphones that connect to it, there is simply less need for wrapping it up in a third-party security blanket like Good or BES. Motorola (who sold Good Technology in 2009), for example, has already released several Android phones that are capable of supporting the full range of Exchange security policies without any help from Good, rendering them redundant and unnecessary. When/if more phone makers go this route, that will be the end of Good. They've seen the writing on the wall and are doing everything they can to try to remain viable.

    BTW these articles take Good's analysis and try to make the claim that, based on Good's findings, iOS has a greater market share in enterprise, especially among tablets. However, their analysis only shows that Good has a greater market share on iOS in enterprise. With Android 3.0 supporting encrypted storage, there is simply no need for Good to run on many Android tablets.

    Google preps Android for its corporate interview, adds new encryption and security measures -- Engadget

    For all Good knows (or we know) there could be just as many or more Android 3.0 tablets in enterprise as iOS tablets.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    Good is experiencing declining market share, just like RIM is. Both of their business models are under attack from the very platforms they are designed to work with in a supporting role: Exchange and smartphones.
    This is not meant to be smarta$$ but do you have any links to declining market share? A search on this term "Good For Enterprise declining market share" does not yield anything to prove your point.

    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    As Exchange gets better and more secure along with the smartphones that connect to it, there is simply less need for wrapping it up in a third-party security blanket like Good or BES. Motorola (who sold Good Technology in 2009), for example, has already released several Android phones that are capable of supporting the full range of Exchange security policies without any help from Good, rendering them redundant and unnecessary. When/if more phone makers go this route, that will be the end of Good. They've seen the writing on the wall and are doing everything they can to try to remain viable.
    Since you mention RIM, does IOS or Android have FIPS 140-2? The security measures on IOS and Android do not equal RIM. I know Apple applied for certification but has yet to receive it. Playbook was just certified for Government use.
    Apple seeks to better iPad, iPhone security via FIPS 140-2 compliance

    As you mention in your comments, Exchange is not there yet, and it's a guess to say when it will be. Does Exchange policy detect jailbreaks? Good is suppose to be able to.

    Encryption is good, do you have any info on where the encryption keys are stored? The above article does not mention central control, which is one of the features of Good. Also Boxtone, Airwatch and Mobile Iron.

    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    ...snip
    BTW these articles take Good's analysis and try to make the claim that, based on Good's findings, iOS has a greater market share in enterprise, especially among tablets. However, their analysis only shows that Good has a greater market share on iOS in enterprise. With Android 3.0 supporting encrypted storage, there is simply no need for Good to run on many Android tablets.....
    For all Good knows (or we know) there could be just as many or more Android 3.0 tablets in enterprise as iOS tablets.
    Where exactly does Good say they know how many non Good devices are being used in the corporate enterprises?
    Good Press Release

    With Good there is no need to worry about what type of encryption a user's device has. The application itself is encrypted.

    Based on the Exchange 2010 Technet, with what is already available with Exchange policy's why do companies go to Good? Are these Fortune 100 & 500 tech departments just stupid, or is there some unknown factor.
    Last edited by sinsin07; 07/23/2011 at 07:11 AM.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    This is not meant to be smarta$$ but do you have any links to declining market share? A search on this term "Good For Enterprise declining market share" does not yield anything to prove your point.
    Not yet. iPad has probably injected some life back into them for now, but it's only short term.

    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    Since you mention RIM, does IOS or Android have FIPS 140-2? The security measures on IOS and Android do not equal RIM. I know Apple applied for certification but has yet to receive it. Playbook was just certified for Government use.
    Apple seeks to better iPad, iPhone security via FIPS 140-2 compliance
    FIPS is a certification standard. Not having FIPS does not necessarily mean a technology is less secure than a technology that does have FIPS. In the article you linked, it says that Apple has already submitted cryptographic modules to the NIST for FIPS certification. Those modules may already be in use on iPad devices. So when/if the NIST grants FIPS certification, that would not make it any more/less secure. Certification gives iOS opportunities it would not have otherwise, not necessarily security it would not have otherwise. BTW, can you tell me what level FIPS 140-2 certification RIM has achieved, and what that level encompasses?

    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    As you mention in your comments, Exchange is not there yet, and it's a guess to say when it will be. Does Exchange policy detect jailbreaks? Good is suppose to be able to.
    Most of the third-party security wrappers will make that claim. I've yet to see any proof. In other words, I don't believe them. IMO trying to block jailbroken devices is utterly futile. As soon as the jailbreakers learn what method is used to detect the jailbreak, they will have a way to subvert it. It's a never ending game that's about as effective as plugging a dike with your thumb. Jailbreaking must be prevented on the company policy level (i.e., jailbreak = termination) rather than a technological level.

    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    Encryption is good, do you have any info on where the encryption keys are stored? The above article does not mention central control, which is one of the features of Good. Also Boxtone, Airwatch and Mobile Iron.
    Central signature control exists in Exchange 2007 and later.

    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    Where exactly does Good say they know how many non Good devices are being used in the corporate enterprises?
    Good Press Release
    I never said Good made this claim. The articles quoting Good's analysis jumped to that conclusion, by pointing at Good's graphs and saying, "hey, look at how many more Good activations there were on iOS tablets than there were Android tablets." I was pointing out the error of jumping to that conclusion.

    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    With Good there is no need to worry about what type of encryption a user's device has. The application itself is encrypted.
    Absolutely true. But as smartphones and smartphone OSes improve to include encryption and other features that Good makes money on, where does that leave Good?

    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    Based on the Exchange 2010 Technet, with what is already available with Exchange policy's why do companies go to Good? Are these Fortune 100 & 500 tech departments just stupid, or is there some unknown factor.
    Fortune whatever companies are the same companies that have server rooms full of DEC VAX and AS/400 systems running legacy apps no one wants to get rid of. They aren't exactly the fastest movers, and most are probably running older versions of Exchange in at least a few of their deparments/regions if not most of them. Security wrappers provide a level of parity throughout fragmented systems, but as the older versions are discarded or upgraded to versions that make Good redundant... Where does that leave Good?

    Good has seen the writing on the wall. It's already become all too clear for RIM, and the rest of the channel will follow. I'll understand if you're skeptical, but I reserve the right (again) for an "I told you so."
    Touchscreens are a fad.

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