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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    The Financial Times found away around the huge costs of having to support every platform with a dedicated full functioning app. Now all they need is a easily adapted app that launches it's web based app.

    I feel this is the way most newspapers and periodicals will go...beides not having to write complex apps for each platform, FT has also found a way of charging for it's content, without having to pay 30% to Apple for listing it among it's downloads.

    Indirectly Apple by charging so much it's killing of part of the golden goose.

    Please use the link to read the balance of the article.

    Take care,

    Jay


    FT Launches Web-Based App to Work on All Tablets

    By REUTERS,June 7, 2011, (Editing by Andre Grenon)

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2011/...gewanted=print

    LONDON (Reuters) - The Financial Times is launching a new, Web-based version of its mobile app, the first of its kind by a major publisher, that will allow it to adapt quickly to new tablet PCs and reduce its dependence on Apple Inc.

    Until now, news publishers have tended to custom-design their tablet offerings for Apple's iPad -- which has opened a new and potentially profitable market for them as print sales decline, and offers a glitch-free experience for users.

    Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, for example, recently launched a new digital newspaper, The Daily, initially just for iPad users in the United States.

    But an explosion in the variety of tablet computers means designing so-called native mobile apps for each device will soon be too costly and slow, and will delay new apps getting to market.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2.    #2  
    Hi all,

    Here is some followup info....

    Take care,

    Jay

    June 7, 2011
    Financial Times Introduces Web App in Effort to Bypass Apple

    By ERIC PFANNER

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/te...gewanted=print

    PARIS — The Financial Times on Tuesday introduced a mobile Web application aimed at luring readers away from Apple’s iTunes App Store, throwing down the gauntlet over new business conditions that Apple is set to impose on publishers who sell digital subscriptions via iTunes.

    A number of publishers have expressed their displeasure with Apple’s plan to retain 30 percent of the revenue from subscriptions sold on iTunes, and to keep customer data from such sales, beginning at the end of June. At the same time, mobile applications are a fast-growing source of new readers and revenue, so publishers have been reluctant to pull their applications from the iTunes store.

    The Financial Times, the British daily, has tried to get around this problem by designing a new app that includes much of the functionality of an iPad or iPhone application, while residing on the open Web. It employs a new Web technology standard called HTML5, which allows programmers to create a single application that can run on a variety of devices, including Apple’s iPhone and iPad, Google’s Android system and the BlackBerry PlayBook, although the new app does not work on some versions of the devices.

    The Financial Times said it would encourage users of its iPad and iPhone applications to migrate to the new app. It said it did not plan to comply with Apple’s proposed conditions, even if that meant Apple removed the existing applications from iTunes.

    “We don’t quite know what will happen,” said Rob Grimshaw, managing director of FT.com. “We’d love to keep our app in iTunes, but it may be that they will block our app at the end of the month.”

    Mr. Grimshaw acknowledged that it was taking a risk, given that mobile customers, the large majority of them iPhone or iPad users, already account for 15 percent of The Financial Times’s digital subscriber growth. Over all, The Financial Times has 224,000 paying customers to its Web site and mobile applications.

    At present, those subscriptions are sold as a single package, offering access via a mobile device or a desktop computer. Publishers say cross-platform subscriptions may become more difficult to offer if Apple goes ahead with its plan.

    Under the proposal, Apple would keep 30 percent of revenue generated by subscriptions that originate via iTunes, including cross-platform packages, while publishers would continue to collect 100 percent of revenue from sales via their own sites.

    Some publishers offer stripped-down, mobile versions of their sites, but these are often less sophisticated than their applications, making it more difficult to justify charging subscription fees for them. While The Financial Times is challenging Apple, a number of magazine publishers have struck agreements to sell subscriptions via iTunes, largely on Apple’s terms.

    “If you’re depending on impulse download, the tablet experience and the ease of payment to get people to pay for your product where they never paid before, paying Apple 30 percent of something may be better than keeping 100 percent of nothing,” wrote Benedict Evans, an analyst at Enders Analysis in London, in a blog posting.

    Apple did not respond to a request for comment. On Monday, the company announced a new app called Newsstand, which will group digital newspapers and magazines together in a single place.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    ...But an explosion in the variety of tablet computers means designing so-called native mobile apps for each device will soon be too costly and slow, and will delay new apps getting to market.
    Now there's an interesting thought...
  4.    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Now there's an interesting thought...
    Hi, my thinking is that the best thing for many apps, especially those for a periodical or stores or a business is to have a small app that is cheap and easy to write for each platform and have a web based app....which works well for webOS users for several reasons...

    1. WebOS is just what is says, an OS that was designed and created to exploit the best attributes for the web.

    2. It also will make many more apps available much faster to the webOS platform, if they need a minor "widget" type app just to get you to their web based app.

    3. Many firms, especially newspapers & periodicals who see Apple making so much $ off the fruits of their labors.

    Newspapers especially are under a great deal of financial pressure and they feel that 30% is way too much for Apple, who after all is doing nothing other than listing the app on their site....

    Before pad type devices, I don't think the magazines and newspapers cared, because they are too large and cumbersome to read for long periods of time on an Iphone or a Pre....however pads changed the situation.....

    4. If Apple gets a great deal of push back from newspapers & periodicals and I think most will end up going around Apple....something the music industry would love to do...most labels also resent the math when it comes to Apple's take.....

    The article clearly states that FT doesn't know if their app will still be on Itunes after the end of this month....which of course is up to Apple...I'm sure they would like it, for the publicity...however, if you sign on thru Apple, I'm sure FT will tell you that you can do so without Apple.

    5. These mini Apps or "widget" type apps, will take up less room on our devices, since they are basically just launching the web...therefore it will free up space for other things: such as more music, videos, photos, other apps...etc....

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  5. #5  
    I've found it actually VERY surprising that publishers would spend their time and resources on apps when the web gives them so much more visibility and exposure.

    I'm thinking that the reason for this is the "Apple"- anything will sell, and that they wanted to get on that bandwagon early - but, seriously, when one doesnt have to expend the time and money to create specific application, and can just have it on the internet for anyone with a user name and password and paid subscription to use, its absolutely dumbfounding to me that they would do otherwise.

    HBO has an app for every major smartphone - except for WebOS (which, to be fair, is not a major OS, yet), but, in doing so, I can't use this online service, which other users can - had they put this on the internet, I could have used my FIOS account username and password to access it from anywhere... and, that would have meant more views for their advertising data..

    Absolutely clueless!

    Perhaps this will change soon enough, though, as Apple's piece of the app becomes something of a contention, and some innocent dude in the boardrooms says "you know, we can do this for free on the web, and get even MORE vews with less fragmented support!"

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

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