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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    what you are speakin of is not multitasking, its saved states...
    Yes!

    Here is a from Google that explains it. When you "exit" an app, it saves your place and work. A text or email is automatically saved as a draft. A real-time game may not save state because there is no point.

    It is like an LED clock. Point your camera at the LEDs to see the segments flicker on and off. It is just refreshing faster than you can tell (60Hz). Even dual core is only doing one thing at a time outside of the CPU.

    But if can do something like this, most would say the phone is "Multitasking"...
    → You are listening to tunes and start an Email. A Calendar pop-up says: "Get gift for bday party"
    → The store has it but the price is ridiculous. Use Barcode Scanner to see Best Buy has it on sale.
    → You hear a song & Shazam it to see who it is. You rip an MP3 of it from YouTube.
    → As you drive, you keep getting texts. You use Messaging speech to text to reply.
    → Best Buy tries to charge you full price. You show them their own in-store ad online.
    → You have voice mail. Use Visual Voicemail to hear the party is now at Olive Garden.
    → You get a Facebook that the party now starts at Olive Garden. You reply.
    → You use Voice Actions to say: "Navigate to Olive Garden"
    → At the party, video chat with a friend who's away.
    → Take photos & HD video & post on Facebook. You Bump your number to someone new.
    → Later, you go finish the email right where you left off.

    All your phone did was save state but to a normal user it feels like multitasking.

    iPhone Multitasking is similar but uses cards to let you look through open apps much like Honecomb's Recent Apps.
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 05/24/2011 at 12:38 PM.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    good summary.

    i want to hark on the closing of background apps for a bit because its quite confusing for even me (an android user).

    When you are switching apps, you never really know what to expect when you return to one of your recent app. There is no way to predict which app will be closed in the background, and when an app is closed, there is no indication it has happened.

    This is pretty frustrating. for example: There are times when i'm making progress in a game, take a call or text, then switch back to my game, only to find that all of my progress was lost and i'm back to the opening screen.

    Other times i'll switch back to the same game without issue. It seems almost random.

    One of my major gripes with android is the number of queries you have to answer in order to get simple tasks done, but this is a situation where i wouldn't mind a simple "RAM usage is critically high, which app would you like to close"
    Same with iOS. I can move from app to app but It's up to the developer to code their app to continually run in the background. This makes it hard to know if I am missing important notifications or updates when not in an app that I just moved from.
  3. #23  
    But even on the flip side, its up to the developers on WebOS to not have their app suck up resources unnecessarily.

    So really , developers are the key here.
  4. #24  
    Here is what you might see if you tap Recent Apps in Honeycomb:


    Flick up or down to scroll through the Recent Apps. The images shown are live screenshots from each app.

    By the end of the year, Ice Cream Sandwich will have incorported this. That will be the first UI completely in the hands of Matias Duarte who did webOS.
    Attached Images Attached Images
  5. h2o826's Avatar
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    #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by milominderbinder View Post
    All your phone did was save state but to a normal user it feels like multitasking
    that is how android and ios "multitask" its not really multitasking, it just saves those in memory. and to actually close them w/out opeining a big program that will force close programs cause they are memory hogs, you can do this in three ways.

    1.(not sure if correct path only mess around w/android phones in stores) go to settings > applications > manage? > find the application in list, click force close. thats how regular android closes an app.

    2. go to marketplace and search task killer, the 1st one that should pop up is Android Task killer, its free and its similar like another poster said, to windows task manager, it displays all apps running in background and you can hit stop, or force close.

    3. Get a webOS phone and enjoy real multitasking, your angrybirds, asphault 5, or other games will be pauses, while you switch. and you dont need a 3rd party app to close your apps, you just swipe them up!

    I hope this information helps, no one else mentioned the task killer app. i have a tealOS centro, and i can multi task like webOS.
  6. #26  
    Android does true background multitasking along with save state. Up to the developer.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by h2o826 View Post
    ...I hope this information helps, no one else mentioned the task killer app. i have a tealOS centro, and i can multi task like webOS.
    Google is begging people to stop using the task killers. Check out what they say about it in this . May I ask who says TO use task killers?

    As to multitasking, unless you have seperate CPU's each with their own memory and I/O, two apps are not running at the same time in parallel. They are doing some version of save state and time sharing or time slicing.

    webOS, iOS, and Android multitask so well that it looks like apss are being run in parallel. Also check out the iPhone Multitasking video to see how cards work in iOS.

    Where webOS and Android still have a lead over iOS is in Notifications but iOS 5 is expected to fix that.
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 05/24/2011 at 03:12 PM.
  8. #28  
    This topic today has interesting timing.

    This just in...Micorsoft Windows Mobile is upgrading their multitasking to be almost identical to iOS cards:

    Multitasking on Mango demoed in detail [Video] | wpcentral

    The video shows how app cards are moved around and selected.

    How old is the card metaphor? Well...old.

    Matias Duarte put cards in the webOS UI in 2009. Andy Rubin used cards in the 2007 Android Browser beta. Steve Job used cards in the 2007 Safari Mobile Browser and iOS 1.0 music player. But all of these are thinly veiled copies of Matias Duarte's Helios UI from 2006 which was a copy of his cards from Danger from as early as 2004 where he just happened to work for Andy Rubin.

    I have no idea who Matias Duarte got the cards idea originally.
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 05/24/2011 at 04:01 PM.
  9. #29  
    For someone coming from webOS, multitasking on Android is quite confusing. I tried it on my Pre with the Android on Pre thing, and I guess Android has no way of indicating to you when an app has closed. That's the really confusing part for me. When I hold the home button and I see the apps listed, coming from webOS I think those are the open apps, but they might be open, they might not be open. At least in webOS if you can still see the app somewhere (in a card, dashboard, or exhibition), you know it's open.

    The whole Android multitasking thing was just really confusing for me. If all your background apps close in the background, then it's not really multitasking...
  10. #30  
    Its not "multitasking", per se, its more of doing lots of tasks that require separate applications and/or thier respective data in a short period of time, without losing your place, data or experiencing a performance hit.

    However you want to call it, the "application in a window" method of doing this has worked extremely well since the desktop PC was first invented - there's no getting around that, and, to most of us here in this forum, WebOS's technique feels most naturally similar to that.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Android does true background multitasking along with save state. Up to the developer.
    Maybe you were just stating a fact. Not sure.

    I got a chuckle out of the "True" qualifier.

    Android and Apple have True Save State - Take That, webOS!
    Just call me Berd.
  12. dv220s's Avatar
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    #32  
    It reminds me of Blackberry's multitasking. Press and hold the menu button to bring up the open apps. Then you can scroll to the right to see your most recent apps. On the BB if there aren't any open apps it'll show to 5 most recent apps. Task switching on BB is also pretty quick despite my old Bold having a 624 MHz Marvel XScale thing and 128 MB ram. Not very high in specs but OS 5 is very optimized unlike Android that slows down even on the fastest phones unless it's the Samsung Galaxy S 2.

    I got off topic but it's still the multitasking topic.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by milominderbinder View Post
    Yes!

    Here is a from Google that explains it. When you "exit" an app, it saves your place and work. A text or email is automatically saved as a draft. A real-time game may not save state because there is no point.

    It is like an LED clock. Point your camera at the LEDs to see the segments flicker on and off. It is just refreshing faster than you can tell (60Hz). Even dual core is only doing one thing at a time outside of the CPU.

    But if can do something like this, most would say the phone is "Multitasking"...
    → You are listening to tunes and start an Email. A Calendar pop-up says: "Get gift for bday party"
    → The store has it but the price is ridiculous. Use Barcode Scanner to see Best Buy has it on sale.
    → You hear a song & Shazam it to see who it is. You rip an MP3 of it from YouTube.
    → As you drive, you keep getting texts. You use Messaging speech to text to reply.
    → Best Buy tries to charge you full price. You show them their own in-store ad online.
    → You have voice mail. Use Visual Voicemail to hear the party is now at Olive Garden.
    → You get a Facebook that the party now starts at Olive Garden. You reply.
    → You use Voice Actions to say: "Navigate to Olive Garden"
    → At the party, video chat with a friend who's away.
    → Take photos & HD video & post on Facebook. You Bump your number to someone new.
    → Later, you go finish the email right where you left off.

    All your phone did was save state but to a normal user it feels like multitasking.

    iPhone Multitasking is similar but uses cards to let you look through open apps much like Honecomb's Recent Apps.
    like i said, saved states is adequate for plenty of tasks, but certainly not all. you say its not necessary to return to the same state in games, but i CANT stand the fact that i lose my progress.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    Android does true background multitasking along with save state. Up to the developer.
    yeah developers choose if they want to use the background processing feature, but ultimately its up to Android how many and how long apps run in the background. In my experience, apps end 1-2 apps later. Not ideal.

    webOS has background multitasking gives lets the user dictate when an app should be closed.
  15. #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    But even on the flip side, its up to the developers on WebOS to not have their app suck up resources unnecessarily.

    So really , developers are the key here.
    fair enough, but can't help but wonder why my epic 4g with 512MB ram wimps out with a game and browser open while my pre- with 256MB of RAM can run more intensive processes without failing..
  16.    #36  
    So one of my favorite features on my pre is that i can go to website, quickly swipe out of it, then check my facebook or something while the website is loading. THen i can go back to the browser card and the page will be fully loaded.

    Can i not do this on android since it uses saved state technology instead of multitasking? or did they incorporate true multitasking into the browser app?
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    fair enough, but can't help but wonder why my epic 4g with 512MB ram wimps out with a game and browser open while my pre- with 256MB of RAM can run more intensive processes without failing..
    This boggled my mind with my Evo as well. I used to think, last summer, "Why does my top-of-the-line superphone with specs out the wazoo feel as laggy as (or more laggy than) my year-old Pre-?"

    A year later, same question.
  18. #38  
    Yes, You can do that on Android.
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by mozzarella72 View Post
    So one of my favorite features on my pre is that i can go to website, quickly swipe out of it, then check my facebook or something while the website is loading. THen i can go back to the browser card and the page will be fully loaded.

    Can i not do this on android since it uses saved state technology instead of multitasking? or did they incorporate true multitasking into the browser app?
    it depends on the combination of apps you are using and how intensive the websites you are loading. if you are using the stock browser there's a good chance you'll be ok. my firefox browser, while it has more features, tends to get closed by Android, requiring you to reload the page.
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    ...There are times when i'm making progress in a game, take a call or text, then switch back to my game, only to find that all of my progress was lost and i'm back to the opening screen...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    well most of the time i don't bother with actually closing apps. I just return to the home screen and go about my business until i forget i ever had the app open. with the poor memory issues that seem to afflict the apps i use, the app is usually closed as soon as i open 1-2 more...
    I had to think about it to put these two thoughts together but something is wrong on your phone.

    I think that there is something wrong with your phone, probably not the hardware but some app appears to have gone rogue. My son's Epic typically has Call of Duty, Need for Speed, EA games, Words with Friends, and a list of other games all while constantly getting and sending texts and Facebook notifications, etc.

    He never loses his place unless he quit in the middle of real time game. But how can you save your place in a real-time multiplayer game?

    Last night was a youth group meeting. Of about 20 there, all but five had Androids. I asked if any of them ever lose their place when they leave an app. Answer: Only with real-time RPG's.

    Is it just one game that loses state for you? What one? Do you ever lose state in stock core apps like Messages, Gmail, Email, Calendar, Facebook, Maps, Browser, etc.?

    What apps do you typically have running? I bet the one that loses state has the memory leak. Tell the developer...and remove it.
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 05/25/2011 at 06:47 AM.
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