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  1.    #1  
    10 Google I/O Opening Keynote Headlines in 51 minutes...

    Music Beta
    • New Google Music App works stand-alone too. First Look
    • Request invitation: http://music.google.com
    • No wires, no syncing...stored in the cloud, also available off-line
    • Get a new phone and music is there
    • Music and Playlist updates available to all devices using account.
    • Albums scroll like 3D iPhone cards

    400,000 Android devices activated a day
    • 100 million Android devices so far
    • 312 different devices in 120 countries
    • 400,000 device activations a day
    • Over 200,000 apps in Android Market
    • 2 years for 1st billion app installs. 5 more months to hit 2 billion.
    • Today 4.5B app installs.

    Android 3.1 out today
    • 3.1 Feature Details
    • Task switcher scrolls more resent apps
    • Extended multitasking - System still manages apps for you ... It'll be invisible
    • Scrolling widgets can now be resized
    • Android 3.1 devices can be USB hosts to download images directly from digital camera to tablet; supports game controllers, keyboards, mice, etc.

    Android Honeycomb updated to 3.1, Google TV support
    • Android 3.1 coming to GoogleTV this summer
    • Google TV will also be getting Android Market

    Movies now in Android Market
    • Rent Android Market movies and stream to devices using the cloud.
    • 30-day rental period. 24-hours to complete viewing.
    • Thousands of titles, starting at $1.99.
    • Movies downloaded in the background. Watch offline.
    • Start watching on your PC, switch to your tablet, then phone, then PC.

    Ice Cream Sandwich coming in Q4
    • Our next mobile release: Ice Cream Sandwich.
    • We're targeting a Q4 launch.
    • Honeycomb's holographic UI and multitasking UI to Ice Cream Sandwich.
    • Will combine features of Honeycomb and Gingerbread into a single OS.
    • For all devices. Google’s Hiroshi Lockheimer said Ice Cream Sandwich to run on current hardware.

    Google guidelines for device updates
    • A team that will create new guidelines for quickly updating devices.
    • Updates for 18 months as long as the hardware allows
    • Partners: Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, ATT, Vodofone, HTC, Samsung, Sony, LG, Motorola.

    Android Open Accessory
    • "Android Open Accessory" will provide ability to create hardware that will work with any mobile device.
    • Open Accessory supports USB now and will support Bluetooth

    Samsung passes out 5,000 Galaxy Tab 10.1s
    • Developers about to pass out too

    Android at Home
    • Every device in your home as a potential Android device
    • Demo was controlling the stage lights.
    • Android@Home light bulbs
    • Connect with appliances. (toasters? )
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 05/10/2011 at 02:57 PM.
  2. #2  
    If anything, I thought this I/O keynote was the perfect example of a company leveraging its size and scale to create an ecosystem that can compete with Apple.

    I know "size and scale" gets bandied around as a way for HP to compete in the mobile space but the key here is Google is doing it by having a massive install base -- not just by throwing money around.
  3. #3  
    Agreed Nappy. Google basically is creating their ecosystem and making it all internet based with no worry for local applications.

    Microsoft has been doing this as well.


    HP is getting the hand me down versions that these companies are doing.
  4. #4  
    Google was pimping the Galaxy Tab 10.1 with Honeycomb pretty hard at the keynote. It will be released in a month or so...... oh yea, they gave away 5000 Tabs to the devs at the conference! I have less and less confidence that HP is guiding webOS in a positive direction, but I can hope.

    HP, this is how it's done. If you don't have an install base, you create one by giving your hardware away to key devs!
  5. #5  
    Apparently they're gonna do just that:
    http://m.forums.precentral.net/hp-pa...y-13-17-a.html
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by FenrirWolf View Post
    Apparently they're gonna do just that:
    http://m.forums.precentral.net/hp-pa...y-13-17-a.html
    HP is giving away tablet to actors, actresses, etc. Google is giving away tablets to developers.
    Want to keep up with my exciting new projects? You know where to find me.
  7. #7  
    This shows how Ruby is *****ing up WebOS. Instead of leveraging H/P size, they added few jobs instead of tripling their numbers.
    If this helped you hit thanks.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    If anything, I thought this I/O keynote was the perfect example of a company leveraging its size and scale to create an ecosystem that can compete with Apple.

    I know "size and scale" gets bandied around as a way for HP to compete in the mobile space but the key here is Google is doing it by having a massive install base -- not just by throwing money around.
    HP pretty much can't win:

    1) Nine months into their acquisition, they are expected to have 4 or 5 new phones on the market.

    2) They are criticized for not exerting their scale, and then they are knocked for taking the time to build a more robust ecosystem to support their products.

    3) The pre-merger phones (no pun intended) are ripped for being also rans, but then the same people blast them deciding to EOL the old stuff to make the new stuff better.

    4) The old Palm was derided (fairly, in my opinion) for rushing to market an not quite ready for prime time package. (Financial problems aside, it's always better to do a few things well and build on that than what they ended up doing); then HP is ridiculed for not making the same mistake.

    There is plenty to criticize them for, primarily a terrible case of "foot-in-mouth" disease, but none of these really qualify. If they just threw around money with no good plan, they'd be Microsoft )

    Not only do you need lots of money to be a player in the smartphone game, but a large dose of testicular fortitude as well.
    "Sometimes I feel like an OS-less child..."
    (with apologies to Billie Holiday )
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by kkhanmd View Post
    This shows how Ruby is *****ing up WebOS. Instead of leveraging H/P size, they added few jobs instead of tripling their numbers.
    The problem is HP's size doesn't help them in a market driven by apps and services. Every service out there (Google Music, iTunes, Xbox Live, etc.) is going to be proprietary and the only way they're going to work is by having massive install bases to utilize them.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    The problem is HP's size doesn't help them in a market driven by apps and services. Every service out there (Google Music, iTunes, Xbox Live, etc.) is going to be proprietary and the only way they're going to work is by having massive install bases to utilize them.
    They could have built hardware like samsung galaxy SII or their thin tab. They could have improved stock apps for webOS like e-mail, calendar etc. They could have introduced LTE and wimax devices.
    If this helped you hit thanks.
  11. #11  
    Last edited by passlogix; 05/10/2011 at 02:11 PM.
  12. #12  
    Wouldn't it be awesome if HP handed out Touchpads to developers? They probably won't though, because that would be the smart thing to do, and if there's anything we've learned from HP/Palm in the past few months, it's that they don't do smart things.
  13. #13  
    I think the biggest significance of this event was that it bumped WebOS out of the top line on engadget.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Courousant View Post
    I think the biggest significance of this event was that it bumped WebOS out of the top line on engadget.
    Not just Engadget; This event is dominating every tech-related website I've looked at today. Google really knows how to get everyone''s attention. lol
    Want to keep up with my exciting new projects? You know where to find me.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Garrett92C View Post
    Not just Engadget; This event is dominating every tech-related website I've looked at today. Google really knows how to get everyone''s attention. lol
    The Think Beyond event did the same thing though, at least at Engadget and a few other tech sites I visit.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by C-Note View Post
    HP pretty much can't win:

    1) Nine months into their acquisition, they are expected to have 4 or 5 new phones on the market.


    2) They are criticized for not exerting their scale, and then they are knocked for taking the time to build a more robust ecosystem to support their products.

    3) The pre-merger phones (no pun intended) are ripped for being also rans, but then the same people blast them deciding to EOL the old stuff to make the new stuff better.
    I don't expect 4-5 new phones. What I thought I could expect was one phone, and one tablet. The tablet they have (debatable whether it can compete hardware wise with the iPad 2, Galaxy Tab 10.1) and the phone is not even hinted at (no, I don't count the Pre 3 or Veer as HP creations).

    All we are left with 9 months after the acquisition is a corporate culture that is the same as before. "In the coming months" has been replaced with "soon", and the webOS faithful are left deciding between dying hardware or upgrading to a different operating system. Clearly, webOS is a winner. All we are asking for is a piece of hardware that lets it have a fighting chance when stacked up against other great hardware running competing software.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by sudarphani View Post
    I don't expect 4-5 new phones. What I thought I could expect was one phone, and one tablet. The tablet they have (debatable whether it can compete hardware wise with the iPad 2, Galaxy Tab 10.1) and the phone is not even hinted at (no, I don't count the Pre 3 or Veer as HP creations).

    All we are left with 9 months after the acquisition is a corporate culture that is the same as before. "In the coming months" has been replaced with "soon", and the webOS faithful are left deciding between dying hardware or upgrading to a different operating system. Clearly, webOS is a winner. All we are asking for is a piece of hardware that lets it have a fighting chance when stacked up against other great hardware running competing software.
    I guess my expectations were different. I didn't expect them to go from zero to even one full phone in less than a year. There could be no deep consideration of such things until after the deal closed. If there was, and the deal fell apart, any alternate suitor would have been very leery with HP knowing ALL of the Palm playbook. So it was in the fiduciary interest of Palm shareholders to not go there until the deal was done.

    This is SOP for a merger. (See how much Windows has done with Nokia so far, or will do with Skype until the deal closes).

    I'm as anxious as anyone to see the new product, but the first thing people will say (even if they release most awesome new phone) is "no ecosystem". I like the indications are HP is beefing up the back-end. Music and the cloud improvements, the moves toward enterprise, a more aggressive stance toward courting developers, and a push to more international markets. All of this takes time and none of it is sexy, but it is what will give them long term viability.

    Will they succeed? Depends on how well they execute. It also depends on how one defines success. Not even Apple will continue to enjoy the success they have had in the past as the de-facto only game in town.
    "Sometimes I feel like an OS-less child..."
    (with apologies to Billie Holiday )
  18. #18  
    Please, forgive me if something is wrong, but...

    The real "G-strategy" it's flood the market with his system - regardless who build the hardware - to overcome the Apple's Hype, and this work.

    So, everything that the HP has to do it's spread webOS, too!

    And; sorry american users, have to spread in ALL WORLD!! Is not only americans or UK developers that are creating apps to iOS or Android, but in every countries that do you have this SO do buy.

    Developers don't want gifts... developers wanna customers, and customers wanna to buy, and to buy they need two things: find & price that can pay.

    Palm Centro has selled 4 milions units in many months, because the people could find in many countries and was not so expensive. It's a simple idea.

    And; YES, the HP can do this with Veer too! It's a simple strategy to follow: spread in all places, and not only in corporate market! The RIM tried this, and we can see what happened...

    Meanwhile, the big "G" grow...


    Best Regards...
    "If A Man Isn't Willing To Take Some Risk For His Opinions, Either His Opinions Are No Good Or He's No Good!" - Ezra Pound (Poet & Critic)
    (Happy A Lot, As A Good Carioca!)
  19. #19  
    I agree that HP could not have started building any hardware before the merger was complete. Whether or not HP could have gotten a head start on hardware between April 28, 2010 when the merger was agreed upon by both boards and July 1, 2010 when the merger cleared regulatory hurdles is also debatable. However, from July 2nd onwards, I expected HP to have devoted every resource at their disposal to making this work. I know they had A LOT of back end work to do to successfully launch a fully supported product with a well developed ecosystem. In my opinion, that is where HP's size and scale would come in most handy. A group HP engineers who had been brought over to the Palm GBU could have picked up the slack in terms of ecosystem, while a separate group could have worked on the hardware side of the story (which is probably what they are doing, but, I have no proof either way).

    Obviously there was some upheaval during the merger, as well as the subsequent departure of M. Hurd. I do believe however, that a company as large and experienced as HP could have had a new product to offer if given one year to complete the task. A release date of July 1, 2011 for a ground up design of a new webOS phone did not seem like an untenable objective.

    Now that we know that HP has not been able to execute on such a timeline, there was no need to have a large scale media event! The timing of this is SO eerily similar to Palm's original showing at CES 2009 in January followed by a June release. This time, it was a February showing.....followed by a June release! In my opinion, if HP did not have firm product availability dates, why have a media presentation? Although, this whole thing about the February event is really another topic.

    I will agree on your last point that the success of webOS and HP is dependent on their execution. I hope that they have learned from prior mistakes. I just worry when looking at the pace of development and ingenuity coming out of Google and to a lesser extent Apple that HP will have a hard time catching up.
  20. #20  
    I agree with your points about the February event. I get the feeling that they wanted to stem the loss of what little press and remaining developer attention they still were getting.

    But this is essentially a reboot and I which they would have acknowledged this instead of acting as if (in the language of sports) they had a competitive team when it was really a rebuilding year. I don't think this would have hurt them as much as some do. There is still a lot of goodwill out there for Palm, they have earned it over the years leading into the recent times. But if they roll out another stinker, there will be no value left to the name or product.

    Also, I don't think there was ever any intention to throw everything at the Palm business unit. While the phones will be an important part of the future if they intend to stay in the consumer realm, HP is a big company and it would not be wise for them cannibalize profitable operations just to get this done a little sooner.
    "Sometimes I feel like an OS-less child..."
    (with apologies to Billie Holiday )
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