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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    ]RIM made "concessions." Caved in to restrictive countries' pressures to spy on their citizens.
    No.
    The encryption on the Blackberrys was better than that on other phones; better enough that oppressive governments weren't able to break into them. Said governments had no problem with the iPhone or Android... there's no way around it, a Blackberry has the best security of any modern smartphone. So the governments said look, if your phones are impossible to hack into we won't let them be sold. What could RIM have done?
  2. #22  
    That's why I say "caved in".
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  3. samab's Avatar
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    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    That's why I say "caved in".
    Then what do you want them to do? Only sell stuff to democratically elected countries --- that's what 20-30 countries. According to your definition, RIM shouldn't even do business with places like Singapore --- which Amnesty International has stated that much of their laws conflict with innocent until proven guilty, that it has been under autocratic/dictatorship for much of its existence.
  4. #24  
    He is second in command at RIM. He doesn't get paid to let his feelings become hurt, he is paid to represent his shareholders. He should have never acted in that manor.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    Then what do you want them to do? Only sell stuff to democratically elected countries --- that's what 20-30 countries. According to your definition, RIM shouldn't even do business with places like Singapore --- which Amnesty International has stated that much of their laws conflict with innocent until proven guilty, that it has been under autocratic/dictatorship for much of its existence.
    Making it easier for governments to spy on citizens is good business according to you all who think it's OK for businesses to make money no matter what? Ok then. It's very sad that people think this way. I'm guessing because it doesn't affect you or you just don't give a because the almighty dollar must always come first. Or you just plain don't give a period, whatever the reason. Then we wonder why eventually the world is slowly falling apart.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  6. #26  
    Hi all,

    Having spent my entire working life as a self employed person and having to speak to the CEO's of firms such as Cunard Lines, Ltd, Continental Airlines, American Airlines, The Chubb Group of Ins Co., Seaborne Cruise Line, Edward Field's, Inc. etc....I also dealt my my share of the press...what happened in the following article (please go to the link to see the video), perhaps this wasn't the best way for Mike Lazaridis, co-CEO of RIM to go.

    Let alone dealing with the trials and tribulation's of my employees, I know it is stressful...My firm was a very small firm, we were dwarfed by the competition, however, I used that fact to our advantage, saying that we were able to give round the clock attention to their firms, etc.... Perhaps Mike Lazaridis, should do the same!

    Take care,

    Jay
    PS. I'm not knocking Rim's products, in fact I have never used to looked at a any of their products...I just think having a melt down or leaving the set of the interview is a terrible way to handle things!


    Why Is RIM's CEO Freaking Out?

    Why Is RIM's CEO Freaking Out? | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

    By Peter Pachall, ARTICLE DATE: 04.13.11

    Today the co-CEO of RIM, Mike Lazaridis, got upset and cut short a BBC interview after the reporter asked him a (fair) question about the company's issues with security in India (see the video below). This comes shortly after he played Rodney Dangerfield to the New York Times, complaining about how his company doesn't get any respect. It's all very un-CEO-like behavior—and from a Canadian, no less (disclosure: I'm one, too). What's got Lazaridis so rattled?

    No one can know what's going on in someone else's head, but looking at the business of phones today, you can see good reason for him to be on edge. While his company sits atop a nice pile of market share (30.4% in the U.S., according the last ComScore report), it's no longer top dog, having been recently ousted by Google's Android. And while Lazaridis points out the company is showing growth and expanding into several markets, so are the other major players in the space. The triple factors of competition, a troubled product launch, and a rapidly changing market are all conspiring to twist up RIM's underwear but good.

    "I think the reason that they may not be garnering the respect he thinks they deserve is because the smartphone market is growing extrememly rapidly," says Charles Golvin, a mobile analyst with Forrester Research. "Does their growth rate actually represent a declining share of a fast-growing market? And is that a harbinger of future decline? Even though their growth the past couple of years has come from the consumer market and overseas, their tradtional source of strength in the enterprise is also being eroded."

    The key problem RIM is facing is that its overall strategy, as laid out last fall, appears to be questionable at best and self-defeating at worst. At All Things D in December, Lazaridis said it was investing heavily in its acquired QNX operating system and dual-core devices, but not on everything (notably, pretty much every BlackBerry on the market today).

    The trouble is, RIM doesn't have any dual-core QNX devices yet. The imminent BlackBerry PlayBook is the first, and so far no phones have been announced. The company has essentially said you can forget about its current crop of smartphones since those aren't going to be relevant in the future anyway (though to be fair, there will likely be a clear upgrade path). When Lazaridis was challenged on this at All Things D, he predictably backpedaled, but in a way that muddled things even further.

    Add to that the coming launch of the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet. The PlayBook was once seen as a potential jewel in the crown of RIM—a tablet that would be the enterprise answer to the iPad. And who knows, it still might be (for PCMag's take, check out our review). But it's looking less and less likely. First, a tremendous amount of time has elapsed since the product was first unveiled in September and the launch, scheduled for April 19. In that time both the Motorola Xoom and iPad 2 have not only been announced but brought to market. Second, the PlayBook's QNX software functions in some half-baked ways; for example, its email app is made to work with an accompanying smartphone. Finally, the launch was apparently delayed many times, possibly even because there was a part shortage due to orders from Apple. It's been an very rocky road for a device that Golvin describes as "a sea change for [RIM] and a modernization of their platform."

    At the same time, competitors are clawing at RIM's market share, with iOS holding onto a weighty 24.7 percent, and Android skyrocketing to 23.5 from 31.2 percent the last six months. In the Android camp, Motorola has even debuted a phone, the Droid Pro, that specifically attacks RIM on the one thing it holds over the competition: security.

    Certainly, RIM is still huge in enterprise, but it's there almost purely for functionality. I wager few people would really lunge for a BlackBerry when it's put next to an iPhone and the latest Android superphone du jour. In other words, as CrunchGear's John Biggs put it, it doesn't have mind share. And in a business where consumers upgrade their phones every 18 months, on average, mind share is more crucial than ever.

    In considering RIM's position, it's instructive to look at Nokia's recent moves to stay relevant in the mobile space. Earlier this year, Nokia was in a position of huge market share, but on top of a very questionable platform. The CEO saw that the company needed to start playing catch-up fast, made some provocative (although considered) comments, and altered the company's strategy radically.

    The parallel only goes so far, especially since Nokia has virtually no U.S. presence while BlackBerries are everywhere. But it'll take a lot more than just a commitment to dual-core devices to set RIM on the right course; everyone's doing dual-core. QNX and the PlayBook will need to deliver, and its next generation of phones have got to wow people in ways the BlackBerry Torch didn't.

    So it's understandable that tensions are high among RIM's upper ranks. Things could really go either way for the company in the coming months, and what it needs now is leadership. Walking out of an interview in a self-righteous huff is a lot of things, but it's not that.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  7. #27  
    Imagine this.

    Say it is just days before a new product launch and you know that you are about to rock the world. You can literally tell your competitors, see you next Tuesday!

    If the week before someone asks you about sales in your 14th market, you might smile and say, They're just mad that they can't crack our encryption.

    But if you have spent days on the phone hearing about how awful your new product is going to be, you might be worried for your job.

    I don't think this tantrum was about India. I think it was about the PlayBook.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by milominderbinder View Post
    Imagine this.

    Say it is just days before a new product launch and you know that you are about to rock the world. You can literally tell your competitors, see you next Tuesday!

    If the week before someone asks you about sales in your 14th market, you might smile and say, They're just mad that they can't crack our encryption.

    But if you have spent days on the phone hearing about how awful your new product is going to be, you might be worried for your job.

    I don't think this tantrum was about India. I think it was about the PlayBook.
    Hi

    I agree with you.

    It also was about the future of his JOB as well.

    However, his behavior is something I would expect from Paris Hilton, Lindsey Lohan, Mel Gibson or Charlie Sheen, not the CEO of a huge company, that is trying to put is't best foot forward.

    take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  9. samab's Avatar
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    #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Making it easier for governments to spy on citizens is good business according to you all who think it's OK for businesses to make money no matter what? Ok then. It's very sad that people think this way. I'm guessing because it doesn't affect you or you just don't give a because the almighty dollar must always come first. Or you just plain don't give a period, whatever the reason. Then we wonder why eventually the world is slowly falling apart.
    I never said it was ok --- I said that EVERYBODY is doing it, so why just ask one particular vendor? You got Nokia and Siemens selling network gears to Iran. Newspaper articles last week just talked about the huge uptick rate of smartphones in North Korea. Companies like IBM and HP have huge divisions that cater to governmental agencies all over the world (and many of them in the middle east).
  10. KAPS's Avatar
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    #30  
    I am from India and I for once support the Indian government on it's ban on blackberry services. These services were used by Terrorist while attacking India and without the blackberry server it is difficult for the Indian government to decipher blackberry messages.
    The blackberry server are not situated in India so Indian government are not able to read the messages sent by blackberry phones.
    Btw do you all think that American government has not already intercepting each and every blackberry message sent through BBM, they are doing this without anyone noticing it. I think the Patriot Act gives the American government unlimited power so that they can do anything for protecting the American people.
    RIM or any other company has to follow the security policies of the country where they are working and I am quite sure they are also helping the American government but will never help a developing nation like India for the same.
    His comment about the people targeting blackberry services was a disgrace.
    news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-20012749-94.html?tag=mncol (Can't post the link because of low post count).
    He think that Indian people don't know internet and we have no computer knowledge. By my guess Indian constitute the 2nd most Master of Computer Science students in US.
    Bye Bye RIM.
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    I never said it was ok --- I said that EVERYBODY is doing it, so why just ask one particular vendor? You got Nokia and Siemens selling network gears to Iran. Newspaper articles last week just talked about the huge uptick rate of smartphones in North Korea. Companies like IBM and HP have huge divisions that cater to governmental agencies all over the world (and many of them in the middle east).
    Hi all,

    Yes they are, all to many governments and news organizations are:

    Last week it came out that at scandal sheet owned by Rupert Murdock was spying on the Press secretary to the Prime Minister of the UK, a bunch actresses etc...there have been charges that the also hacked the voice mail of HRH Prince HRH Charles, HRH Prince William, HRH Prince Harry & soon to be Princess Kathryn, (Kate), his "news rags" deny spying on the Royals however up to a few days ago they denied it all!

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  12. #32  
    I think he could have just said "We are obliged to obey local laws wherever we operate".
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    The only "national security" problem so far for the Blackberry was during the 2008 US Presidential election when newspaper articles suggested that Obama might not be allowed (by the NSA) to have a Blackberry.

    There you have it --- to the ordinary people in India and in the Middle East --- if you want the same level of security of your email as the US President, then the Blackberry may not be adequate for you. On the same token, even the 256 bit AES encryption is only suitable for "Top Secret" documents by the NSA --- and can't be used on information that requires higher security clearance.
    To be fair, the BB the PotUS uses is not a standard BB, it's been hardened.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by rickwestland View Post
    I think he could have just said "We are obliged to obey local laws wherever we operate".
    Dear Rick,

    You hit the nail on the head...that would have been far better than acting like a 3 year old, which is exactly what he did!

    take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
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    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    ...that would have been far better than acting like a 3 year old, which is exactly what he did!
    Absolutely. To add to the visible security issue RIM *do* have (single point of failure - RIM's own servers in whatever dodgy country), the awful launch of their supposed iPad competitor, they now appear to have shown they have a complete numpty for a CEO.

    If anyone was still wondering if RIM had a future, stop now
    PalmPilot Professional...Palm Vx...Treo 600...Treo 680...HTC Touch HD...iPhone 4S...
  16. #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by tirk View Post
    Absolutely. To add to the visible security issue RIM *do* have (single point of failure - RIM's own servers in whatever dodgy country), the awful launch of their supposed iPad competitor, they now appear to have shown they have a complete numpty for a CEO.

    If anyone was still wondering if RIM had a future, stop now
    Hi all,

    Perhaps he needs to be punished as a 3 year old is, meaning..not buy the Palybook will certainly put his job at risk...frankly the board of directors should give him time out or in his case time off, (as in full time off as in your fired)...

    take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  17. #37  
    apparently, he handled this topic much better during a WSJ interview.

    "RIM also has been in the news lately because of conflicts with some governments that want backdoor access to users’ information. Mr. Balsillie said those countries should go to mobile networks or the BlackBerry user’s employer with a warrant and demand information from them instead of RIM. “It’s because of architecture we can’t do this, not by choice.”

    RIM’s CEO Talks About PlayBook, Security Concerns - Digits - WSJ
  18. samab's Avatar
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    #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    Dear Rick,

    You hit the nail on the head...that would have been far better than acting like a 3 year old, which is exactly what he did!

    take care,

    jay
    Not when you watch the unedited video which showed that the reporter to be acting like a 2 year old.
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by samab View Post
    Not when you watch the unedited video which showed that the reporter to be acting like a 2 year old.
    hi, I thought about and your right, they deserve each other...if the idea was to make someone want to run out and buy a BB or a play book, it didn't work...

    Take care,

    jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong but weren't both AT&T and Verizon compromising people due to the "Patriot" Act(more like break the Constitution Act) and received an exemption from any lawsuits arising out of their breaches?
    It was legal before the Patriot Act since the Supreme Court ruled in the 1979 that call metadata (what number was called, call time, duration, etc - stuff that is used primarily for billing) isn't protected by the US Constitution's 4th Amendment. Also, the 1977 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act allows for surveillance on US citizens and a warrant has to be obtained within 72 hours after the surveillance begins. If the warrant isn't obtained, the data collected has to be purged. IMHO, the exception was to eliminate any Tom, ****, and Harry from suing these companies over privacy rights that were given away a long time ago, driving up legal fees and wasting court time.
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