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  1.    #1  
    Between the dwindling opportunities for hardware differentiation in the smartphone and tablet markets, and the Windows-like commoditizing effect that Android is having across mobile device makers, Motorola Mobility (like its competitors) have few options but to build their own user experiences.

    Apparently, Android might not be good enough for Motorola Mobility. At least not as it comes in its plain vanilla form.

    Full Article... Click here


    By the way... Take with a BIG LUMP of salt.. As notice he doesn't know what motoblur is , but interestingly he knows webos ..


    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Last edited by HelloNNNewman; 03/24/2011 at 11:37 PM. Reason: updated title
  2. #2  
    That was obvious due to the MotoBlur crap. They apparently don't think it's good enough in vanilla form. The problem though, Blur is a bloated mess.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    That was obvious due to the MotoBlur crap. They apparently don't think it's good enough in vanilla form. The problem though, Blur is a bloated mess.
    After playing with an atrix, and motoblur for the first time last week.. I must agree.. Motoblur Sucks big time.. I hate to see what their mobile OS would look like if its modeled after blur

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  4. #4  
    Maybe if they didn't use Fisher Price colored skin, too many widgets, duplication of already included apps, and RAM heavy usage. HTC has Sense and there haven't been near as many complaints from what I've seen.

    On 1.5, it was likely needed to some degree. But on 2.1 and up, useless.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  5.    #5  
    If Moto is looking into a mobile OS.. Really a Sixth player?

    Apple
    Google
    RIM
    WP7
    HP
    Moto


    Is the software market really that big, to just start even later than HP?

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  6. #6  
    they should buy the OS that Nokia just threw away...
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    they should buy the OS that Nokia just threw away...
    Wasn't it opensource?

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  8. #8  
    According to wikipedia, it's open source.
  9. #9  
    "From CTIA yesterday, Nelson filed a video report showing a 3D interface that HTC has added to Samsung's newest EVOs."

    *takes out saltshaker*
  10. #10  
    Hi all,

    This one took me by total surprise!

    Take call all,

    Jay

    Motorola Apparently Not Satisfied With Android

    Motorola Apparently Not Satisfied With Android -- InformationWeek

    Between the dwindling opportunities for hardware differentiation in the smartphone and tablet markets, and the Windows-like commoditizing effect that Android is having across mobile device makers, Motorola Mobility (like its competitors) have few options but to build their own user experiences.

    By David Berlind InformationWeek
    March 23, 2011 12:24 PM
    Apparently, Android might not be good enough for Motorola Mobility. At least not as it comes in its plain vanilla form.

    Based on my colleague Tom Claburn's report in InformationWeek speculating that Motorola Mobility is developing its own mobile Web operating system, Motorola is sending a pretty clear signal to Google and the market that it will need its own secret sauce if it's going to successfully compete against the likes of Samsung, Acer, HTC, and a slew of other hardware manufacturers who together are essentially commoditizing Android. As more manufacturers come to market with Android devices with the same basic chipsets, multi-touch displays, camera, and audio configurations, the opportunities for hardware differentiation are rapidly dwindling. So, where else is there to turn but the software?

    The Blackberry Torch 9800 offers both the traditional Blackberry keyboard and a touch screen interface for a much more modern user experience. Its new OS also adds loads of new features.As Claburn reports, Motorola Mobility has been quietly assembling its own dream team whose pedigree lies in operating system development. Wrote Claburn: "Over the past nine months, Motorola Mobility has been hiring engineering talent that would well-suited to create a new mobile operating system. Its team appears to include a significant number of ex-Apple and Adobe personnel, including Gilles Drieu, VP of software engineering at Motorola Mobility, Benoit Marchant, director of engineering at Motorola Mobility, and Sean Kranzberg, also a director of engineering at Motorola Mobility."

    So far, Motorola Mobility hasn't confirmed or denied its plans to InformationWeek, but has said that it remains "committed to Android as operating system." Claburn cites one analyst -- Deutsche Bank's Jonathan Goldberg -- as saying that he heard the new Moto OS rumors as well. My colleague Fritz Nelson is at the CTIA telecommunications conference this week and, among other things, is trying to find more insiders to comment.

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    Editor's note 3/23 3:06 PM ET: A Motorola spokesperson said that the company will not comment on rumors, only saying that the company is fully committed to Android as its mobile OS. When pressed with other Motorola statements about the work being done on the company's own efforts, the spokesperson said that it is interested in what is happening with HTML5 and mentioned the Webtop solution that runs the Motorola Atrix. Reading into that, we might jump to the conclusion that a slightly client-less OS could be where the company wants to continue experimenting. Additionally, several readers contacted InformationWeek about Motoblur, a technology that Motorola has used to skin Android on certain models. Some comments appear in the comment section below.

    The question is, what exactly is Motorola up to? Here at InformationWeek, we've narrowed the news down to two possible outcomes. The first is, as Claburn suggests, that Motorola plans to develop its own Web-friendly mobile operating system. There is another option though. Motorola Mobility could very well stay committed to Android while at the same time differentiating its Android-based devices by developing its own user interface.

    If Motorola Mobility developed its own user experience layer to run on top of Android, it wouldn't be the first time that a mobile device maker looked to differentiate its hardware through a proprietary user interface. From CTIA yesterday, Nelson filed a video report showing a 3D interface that HTC has added to Samsung's newest EVOs. HTC has also been outfitting its Android devices with HTC Sense -- a user experience technology designed to put "people at the center by making phones work in a more simple and natural way," according to a HTC press release from last year. Additionally, Samsung has developed a drag-n-drop user experience layer for personalizing Android devices called TouchWiz.

    But, were Motorola Mobility to hedge its bets by developing its own full blown OS, the company wouldn't be without its justifications. According to Nelson, who has been testing an Android-based Motorola Xoom (that runs the latest Android 3.0 aka "Honeycomb" operating system), there are problems with the tablet. The biggest of these is that apps -- at least the ones he has been using -- routinely crash. Furthermore, third parties in the software development community have been critical of the Xoom's HTML5 support.

    In a blog post last month, Sencha's Aditya Bansod concluded that "The Xoom browser is not ready for prime-time -- even for HTML4 -- and it urgently needs a patch update if Motorola wants the product to succeed."

    Later in the post, Bansod went on to say: "We were excited about the first true Android operating system for tablets and had high hopes for a mobile browser that was as powerful as the platform. Sadly, the Xoom and Honeycomb are a real disappointment. We found consistent and reproducible issues in CSS3 Animations and CSS3 Transitions among other things. We had issues where the browser either hung or crashed. Regular scrolling was slow or below full frame rate. We had issues where media playback failed or performed incorrectly. At times it felt like we were using a pre-production device, but we bought our test device from a Verizon Wireless store."

    Nelson also says that the Xoom's browsing experience leaves much to be desired. For example, compared to an iPad, the Xoom has major problems displaying colors accurately when browsing Web pages.

    If Motorola were to develop its own operating system, it wouldn't be alone in playing both sides of the fence, either. Samsung, for example, has abandoned Windows Mobile in favor of Android. It also has the open source-based Bada operating system in its stable. Bada is used internationally, but hasn't surfaced in a domestic U.S. device yet. Additionally, HP is in the market with its own WebOS (which came with the Palm acquisition) and, at the same time, HP CEO Leo Apotheker said he remains committed to launching mobile devices based on an ARM-compliant version of Microsoft's Windows.

    In either case (building a new mobile OS, or a proprietary UI for Android), Motorola Mobility's incredibly deep ties with the wireless carriers could lead to a UI that better exposes the plethora of services that those carriers are desperately trying to use as both differentiators and upsell opportunities to drive additional ARPU (average revenue per user).

    Meanwhile, what do you think Motorola is up to? Let me know by writing to me or leaving your thoughts in the comments section below.
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  11. romls's Avatar
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    #11  
    I saw this article on Information Week's site and thought it may be of interest to PreCentral readers

    http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=229400097

    The article cites analysts that claim Motorola is working on an alternative to Android. Says it may be because of fragmentation, patent lawsuits or simply to differentiate itself. Also uses HP's purchase of Palm to validate the use of a Web-based OS.
    Last edited by romls; 03/24/2011 at 03:42 PM.
  12. #12  
    Android did save them from the brink of extinction though, so you'd think they'd be a little more grateful. I think their Xoom problems are almost all their own. They released a product that wasn't fully tested apparently, and did not make that clear to consumers.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    [COLOR="Navy"]Android did save them from the brink of extinction though, so you'd think they'd be a little more grateful./COLOR]
    Companies don't appreciate, or do what's "right", they pick the path they believe will make them the most cash. Thats it, that's all.

    They'll keep making android phones, but want something proprietary.
  14. #14  
    Considering their recent releases full of bugs and omissions, good luck because they will need it!!
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  15. spare's Avatar
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    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    Android did save them from the brink of extinction though, so you'd think they'd be a little more grateful. I think their Xoom problems are almost all their own. They released a product that wasn't fully tested apparently, and did not make that clear to consumers.
    Moto and Verizon's advertising made (an)droid popular which in turn brought devs to android. They owe android nothing.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by spare View Post
    Moto and Verizon's advertising made (an)droid popular which in turn brought devs to android. They owe android nothing.
    You really believe that? LOL!!! Motorola mobile division was down for the count, just like Palm. Android brought them back, plain and simple.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  17. #17  
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  18. spare's Avatar
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    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by The Phone Diva View Post
    You really believe that? LOL!!! Motorola mobile division was down for the count, just like Palm. Android brought them back, plain and simple.
    Nothing I said says android didn't bring them back.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  19.    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by spare View Post
    Nothing I said says android didn't bring them back.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Nothing she said.. Said that you did... Just that they do "owe" android for saving them

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  20. #20  
    Now everybody is on going that way . First the BB Playbook now Motorola. But it will take time to have a final web based OS, although Motorola has been working on it a year ago.

    The patents conflicts between Microsoft and Android are making Motorola going that way.

    The interesting thing the article writer said finally the competition is recognizing the webOS standards as you pointed out too romls:

    "The fact that HP paid $1.2 billion for Palm and its webOS suggests there's some value in leveraging Web standards. "
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