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  1.    #1  
    From the folks that brought us JoliCloud comes their latest product: JoliOS. JoliOS installs on an existing Windows x86/x64 computer either as a replacement OS (a la Google Chrome) or as dual boot option for your computer. Once installed and launched, your computer becomes a cloud device running a wide range of web apps.

    Is this what HP is planning by putting webOS on all their computers next year?
  2. #2  
    I always thought the Jolibook did some really cool things despite being hampered by...you know...being a netbook. JoliOS being used to get more mileage out of old hardware seems like a really good idea to me.
  3. #3  
    Have you tried using JoliOS? Is it essentially the same as JoliCloud?

    JoliCloud looks very nice. I guess their concept of "apps" is the same as Chrome "apps", that is, just bookmarks to websites. That's probably why I couldn't get the OpenOffice apps to work in the browser. Maybe those apps are JoliOS exclusive...

    If JoliCloud is the same as JoliOS, I could see people adopting it. Try an OS in your browser and install it if you like it. Now that's a great concept.
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    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by rsanchez1 View Post
    Have you tried using JoliOS? Is it essentially the same as JoliCloud?

    JoliCloud looks very nice. I guess their concept of "apps" is the same as Chrome "apps", that is, just bookmarks to websites. That's probably why I couldn't get the OpenOffice apps to work in the browser. Maybe those apps are JoliOS exclusive...

    If JoliCloud is the same as JoliOS, I could see people adopting it. Try an OS in your browser and install it if you like it. Now that's a great concept.
    You couldn't get the OpenOffice apps to work because they're not just bookmarks to websites. The OpenOffice apps are real, native apps which would be installed if you had JoliOS installed.
    When you visit JoliCloud in a web browser, you can't get access to any native apps; only web apps are usable.
  5. #5  
    Ah, I see.

    You know, a situation similar to that might arise with Enyo. You could take Enyo and your apps everywhere, but compiled, native apps would be restricted on-device...

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  6.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by rsanchez1 View Post
    Ah, I see.

    You know, a situation similar to that might arise with Enyo. You could take Enyo and your apps everywhere, but compiled, native apps would be restricted on-device...
    The way that works with Joli OS is the native apps (which are essentially Linux applications) can either use local storage for its files or a cloud service, which Joli OS incorporates seamlessly. It's a reasonably clever application of a limited Linux release, but it's not the end-all/be-all.

    The Joli OS concept did, however, strike me as what HP has planned for webOS on their computers: A stripped-down version of Linux with a pretty face and limited feature set running on devices that are generally overpowered for the webOS capabilities. I'm not sure I see the point in all that.

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