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  1.    #1  
    Here's an interesting article that talks about what it would take to break Apple's and Google's dominance of the smartphone market. The answer proposed by the Wholesale Application Community, of which HP is a member, is to allow cross-platform apps using HTML5.

    As we all know, webOS uses HTML5 for many apps, and the Enyo framework allows for cross-platform apps. Wouldn't it be crazy if HP tried to position Enyo as the WAC standard for cross-platform apps?

    http://money.cnn.com/2011/03/09/tech...ions/index.htm

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  2. #2  
    It's an interesting idea but if the iPhone and Android phones can also run HTML5 apps in addition to the hundreds of thousands of native apps each platform has, wouldn't this end up being just another reason to buy one of those phones rather than one running a less popular platform?
  3. #3  
    Good read. I like the idea. That could replace most apps today. Will html5 be able to use api's in a similar way?

    Why is the webos amount drawn so tiny compared to the windows one? Only a 3,500 difference ...it's like they entered 6 lol.

    Selling my Palm things: just make an offer: http://forums.webosnation.com/market...nd-offers.html
  4. #4  
    Good article but I think things like Appcelerator and PhoneGap give the Android and iOS a leg up in this regard (though it's not 100% WORA). If Apple and Google does not join WAC you'd have two camps with regards to cross-platform development: those who target Android and iOS (and soon BBOS...maybe) and those who target everyone else. At the moment, Android and iOS together still represent a sum that is greater than the combined "everyone else". I think people will still target the big boys first.

    Also, like the article mentioned, games (like Angry Birds) and apps requiring device feature access are a no go. Those are huge hurdles. Look at all the complaints just about webOS' or WP7's "missing APIs". I think the apps would be to basic.
  5.    #5  
    I'm not familiar with Angry Birds on other platforms, but does it require device features? At least for webOS, it only requires touchscreen input.

    If everyone standardizes features like gyroscopes, dependence on device features could be reduced. The tricky part in my opinion would be standardizing OS features. If all features are standardized, consumers won't have the motivation to try platforms besides Android and iOS.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  6. #6  
    I know games like that require the GPU for one.

    But you would think the requirements would work their way into HTML5 at some point.

    Selling my Palm things: just make an offer: http://forums.webosnation.com/market...nd-offers.html
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by rsanchez1 View Post
    I'm not familiar with Angry Birds on other platforms, but does it require device features? At least for webOS, it only requires touchscreen input.

    If everyone standardizes features like gyroscopes, dependence on device features could be reduced. The tricky part in my opinion would be standardizing OS features. If all features are standardized, consumers won't have the motivation to try platforms besides Android and iOS.
    It sounds great, but there are some hurdles to its success.

    First, WAC apps can't take advantage of a phone's hardware specifications, because they need to be written for all devices. For instance, WAC applications couldn't make use of the iPhone's gyroscope, the LG Optimus 3D screen or the Motorola Atrix's dual-core processor.

    Even an application like Angry Birds, which reflects the idiosyncrasies of each different operating system it runs on, wouldn't be easily WAC-enabled.

    That means the quality of WAC applications is limited -- something developers won't necessarily buy into.
    I'm not a huge gamer but games are HUGE! There is a lot that can be done with HTML 5, but remember, even Palm recognized the need for something like a PDK. When we use some of the current cross-platform tools (like PhoneGap) for projects, we write additional platform specific "stuff" when we need to access hardware features.

    In the end, I have to wonder why Apple or Google would give up what many consider to be one of their major advantages? Look at how hard it is to standardize something as relatively simple as a web browser. Do we really think we are going to get people to standardize full operating systems AND hardware? I only see this working via some sort of VM and that brings its own set of problems.

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