Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. RafRol's Avatar
    Posts
    544 Posts
    Global Posts
    570 Global Posts
       #1  
    Much talk has been going around about how RIM is imitating WebOS with their tablet (along with their OS woes). There has also been much talk about Nokia and their new partnership (and their OS woes prior).

    I started to think about the time that Palm was acquired by HP and wondered which were the companies that lost on bids to purchase Palm. If RIM and Nokia did place bids, then it's beginning to appear how big an opportunity they let slipped through their fingers. Either company could have out-bid HP, and either company is better off competing with WebOS rather than against WebOS & HP.

    This in turn has me thinking... who would have been a better partner with Palm? HP? RIM? Nokia? All three have their strengths and weakness'.

    I'm quite happy that it was HP that bought Palm since the beginning (although Mark Hurd did give me a good scare for a bit), but how would things be different if it was RIM that bought Palm? Would we see a WebOS 2.x with enterprise-class security and BBM? We already know what the Playbook would look like. How would things be different if Nokia acquired Palm? Obviously they wouldn't have partnered with Microsoft. Would we have WebOS devices on some high-end, world-class hardware with multiple form-factors? and near immediate worldwide distribution? and Ovi Maps in place of Google Maps?

    Would WebOS be more competitive with either company? Or would they have just bought Palm for their patents and bury WebOS in some virtual filing cabinet never to be seen again?

    Sound off before I continue to ramble...
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by RafRol View Post
    I started to think about the time that Palm was acquired by HP and wondered which were the companies that lost on bids to purchase Palm. If RIM and Nokia did place bids, then it's beginning to appear how big an opportunity they let slipped through their fingers. Either company could have out-bid HP, and either company is better off competing with WebOS rather than against WebOS & HP.
    Why don't we wait and see if any competition develops before we plan the ticker tape parade down Broadway for HP's success, shall we? RIM and Nokia are certainly faltering, but neither one has been as close to the abyss as the webOS crowd ... and nothing done to date by HP has indicated a step back from that abyss yet.
  3. #3  
    One word:

    "Yes!"
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  4. RafRol's Avatar
    Posts
    544 Posts
    Global Posts
    570 Global Posts
       #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Why don't we wait and see if any competition develops before we plan the ticker tape parade down Broadway for HP's success, shall we? RIM and Nokia are certainly faltering, but neither one has been as close to the abyss as the webOS crowd ... and nothing done to date by HP has indicated a step back from that abyss yet.
    Granted that HP hasn't resurrected WebOS yet, the point that I was trying to make is that Nokia spends, according to a Bloomberg article, a third of $4 Billion dollars per year for Mobile OS R&D. Nokia could have easily bought Palm and avoided paying licensing fees to Microsoft.
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  5. RafRol's Avatar
    Posts
    544 Posts
    Global Posts
    570 Global Posts
       #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    and RIM has their tablet device out months sooner than HP so, perhaps, they saved a billion or so building their own.
    Yes, RIM has revealed the Playbook in it's current form, but last I checked RIM isn't selling the Playbook to the public. I would say they don't necessarily have a lead over the HP TouchPad; unless you were referring to their launch date. If they do launch in April, it will be with an OS that is dependent on a Blackberry for corporate email.
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  6. samab's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    2,060 Global Posts
    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by RafRol View Post
    Yes, RIM has revealed the Playbook in it's current form, but last I checked RIM isn't selling the Playbook to the public. I would say they don't necessarily have a lead over the HP TouchPad; unless you were referring to their launch date. If they do launch in April, it will be with an OS that is dependent on a Blackberry for corporate email.
    Both QNX and Palm were bought out in April last year --- and RIM paid a billion dollars less.

    If RIM were to buy Palm after they bought QNX --- you know what RIM would have done. They would have dump webos and essentially bought the patents. WebOS developers would be developing QNX-based "webworks" stuff on tablets and smartphones.

    How hard is it going to be for RIM to give you native access to your hotmail.com account with their native playbook email client? Microsoft can do that for Outlook with a 3mb "Outlook Connector" plug-in. That was never the hard part. The hard part for RIM was to prevent you from copying/pasting stuff from corporate email and forward using your private email account. RIM buying Palm wouldn't have helped them one bit on that security concern.
  7. #7  
    I think some of the companies that were after Palm just wanted access to all those patents and not much more. I think Palm chose HP because they believed that HP really had a plan for webOS.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums


    My Themes:CLICK HERE
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by RafRol View Post
    title " Did RIM and Nokia missed an opportunity?"

    Much talk has been going around about how RIM is imitating WebOS with their tablet (along with their OS woes). There has also been much talk about Nokia and their new partnership (and their OS woes prior).

    I started to think about the time that Palm was acquired by HP and wondered which were the companies that lost on bids to purchase Palm. If RIM and Nokia did place bids, then it's beginning to appear how big an opportunity they let slipped through their fingers. Either company could have out-bid HP, and either company is better off competing with WebOS rather than against WebOS & HP.

    This in turn has me thinking... who would have been a better partner with Palm? HP? RIM? Nokia? All three have their strengths and weakness'.

    I'm quite happy that it was HP that bought Palm since the beginning (although Mark Hurd did give me a good scare for a bit), but how would things be different if it was RIM that bought Palm? Would we see a WebOS 2.x with enterprise-class security and BBM? We already know what the Playbook would look like. How would things be different if Nokia acquired Palm? Obviously they wouldn't have partnered with Microsoft. Would we have WebOS devices on some high-end, world-class hardware with multiple form-factors? and near immediate worldwide distribution? and Ovi Maps in place of Google Maps?

    Would WebOS be more competitive with either company? Or would they have just bought Palm for their patents and bury WebOS in some virtual filing cabinet never to be seen again?

    Sound off before I continue to ramble...

    i personally think, WebOS will struggle and it should have been licensed to grow market share and not have to worry about hardware plus please more people with different form factors. Thus, i'm not sure it would have been better on either because i doubt either would do that.

    RIM probably would be best at least in the states. i have no idea how it would work with what RIM already has and doesn't want to lose. but RIM bought another company that developed it's OS. From RIM's perspective i think the missed opportunity is not using the company they bought to first address their declining smartphone sales.

    i think because Webos will struggle i think Nokia was right to go with a licenced OS like Windows but were i them i'd have done like Motorola and gone Android but that's just me. Also Nokia does pretty much nothing in the smartphone space in the U.S., Has a rep for not getting along with U.S. carriers so i'd bet WebOS on Nokia phones wouldn't exactly get them flooding into U.S. stores, which considering that's where i live, would be an issue. I mean i don't think i've actually recall seeing a Nokia phone in about 7 years. But Nokia is big in the rest of the world.

    Personally. i think the best thing that could have happened, If people really wanted WebOS to be a big player in the smartphone and tablet market, was to have Microsoft buy Palm. As we can see, they are a software company not hardware (aside from Xbox) and they have the muscle to get stuff done in the phone space . they have the developer connections. a **** load of cash sitting around. i don't think they have near the vision Apple does but they are a well run company which i can't always say for HP. But WebOS would have been licensed and just like you see some 5 WP7 phones out now and more to come in the next few months, you'd see that many webos phones. Not a pre 3 and a veer coming in 3 months. you'd see phones from samsung, LG, HTC etc all in different formfactors pleasing a ton of people, and with Microsoft's pull i'd bet like WP7 we'd have new apps flying in the catalog. They crossed 9200 apps already. They could have zune integration instead satisfying those that want a desktop interface. Docs@go? Who'd care. We'd have office on the phone! Hey and the music player wouldn't suck.

    After that probably RIM. cause they already have a large client base. HTC would have been interesting. Another really interesting buyer would have been Samsung. Because again, massive company, that basically hemorrhages phones every quarter. But who knows for sure.
  9. #9  
    licensing webOS wouldn't have worked. Android is free, how do you compete with that?

    You could argue that Nokia and BB missed an opportunity, but they found other opportunities that are comparable.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    licensing webOS wouldn't have worked. Android is free, how do you compete with that?

    You could argue that Nokia and BB missed an opportunity, but they found other opportunities that are comparable.
    the same companies making android phones also make wp7 phones. someone is buying it and if you have microsoft's cash you can afford it. not only that. can you name a none licensed OS that has gained more then 5% market share since ios was released?
  11. RafRol's Avatar
    Posts
    544 Posts
    Global Posts
    570 Global Posts
       #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmagic01 View Post
    Personally. i think the best thing that could have happened, If people really wanted WebOS to be a big player in the smartphone and tablet market, was to have Microsoft buy Palm.
    I was originally going to throw Microsoft into the mix when I started this thread, considering their situation in the market; but then I changed my mind because Microsoft is in the OS business. Like Palm, they shouldn't have waited so long to revamp their mobile OS, and like Palm, I can think of no excuse for that.

    That being said, I think WebOS turned out better than what Access Linux Platform might have been.
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  12. samab's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    2,060 Global Posts
    #12  
    Basically every single bidder (except HP) was bidding Palm for its patents. Nobody (Apple, Google and RIM) actually wanted WebOS.

    Apple Tried To Buy Palm Before HP Won The Bidding War -- And RIM Completely Blew The Deal

    Of course, the Business Insider writer was still (at that time) under the illusion that RIM bought QNX for the automobile market, so the writer didn't put RIM under the patent buying category.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions