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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI...If you must have an Iphone, (not me I don't want one), that works well you want V...however, having been with V for over 3 years all I can say is that V is over priced and has way too many rules...besides they like to disable way to many advanced features...

    take care,

    Jay

    For iPhone, Almost Heaven
    By DAVID POGUE,February 2, 2011

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/te...gewanted=print

    It’s here. After almost four years of speculation, the iPhone will finally come to Verizon’s network on Feb. 10.

    And to answer everyone’s question, the Verizon iPhone is nearly the same as AT&T’s iPhone 4 — but it doesn’t drop calls. For several million Americans, that makes it the holy grail.

    I took the Verizon iPhone to five cities, including the two Bermuda Triangles of AT&T reception: San Francisco and New York. Holding AT&T and Verizon iPhones side by side in the passenger seat of a car, I dialed 777-FILM simultaneously, and then rode around until a call dropped. (Why that number? Because I wanted to call a landline, eliminating the other person’s cell reception from the equation. Also, Mr. Moviefone can carry the entire conversation by himself, so I could concentrate on the testing.)

    In San Francisco, the AT&T phone dropped the call four times in 30 minutes of driving; the Verizon phone never did. The Verizon iPhone also held its line in several Manhattan intersections where the AT&T call died. At a Kennedy airport gate, the AT&T phone couldn’t even find a signal; the Verizon dialed with a smug yawn.

    Most impressively, the Verizon iPhone effortlessly made calls in the Cellphone Signal Torture Chamber of Doom: my house.

    The Verizon iPhone did drop one call — in baggage claim at the Los Angeles airport. And, of course, there are regions where AT&T coverage is better than Verizon’s. But in general, my testing matches the conclusions of Consumer Reports and RootMetrics.com: the Verizon iPhone has more bars in more places. (Hey, that might make a good slogan! Oh, wait...)

    In general, the Verizon and AT&T iPhones are identical. Same sleek, thin, satisfying, plastic-free body — all glass and metal. Same gorgeous, high-resolution screen — 960 by 640 pixels. Same battery life — you’ll need a recharge every night. Same camera on the back, which can take 5-megapixel stills or excellent hi-def video — the flash doubles as a video light. Same low-resolution camera on the front, suitable for Wi-Fi videochats, using Apple’s FaceTime software for iPhone or Mac.

    Even the prices are about the same. The 16-gigabyte phone costs $200 with two-year contract. The monthly service costs, for example, $70 for unlimited voice calls, plus $20 for 5,000 text messages, plus $30 a month for unlimited Internet use. (Verizon says that it will soon eliminate that unlimited plan, just as AT&T recently did. Instead, you’ll pay something like $25 a month for 2 gigabytes of Internet data. Good luck figuring out how much that is.)

    The single new feature in Verizon’s iPhone is Personal Hotspot, where the iPhone becomes a Wi-Fi base station. Up to five laptops, iPod Touches or other gadgets can get online, using the phone as a glorified Internet antenna.

    That’s incredibly convenient. Many other app phones have it — AT&T’s iPhone gets it on Feb. 13 — but Apple’s execution is especially nice. For example, the hot spot shuts itself off 90 seconds after the last laptop disconnects. That’s hugely important, because these personal hot spot features are merciless battery drains.

    The hot spot feature costs $20 a month extra, and buys only 2 gigabytes of data for all of those laptops. Think e-mail, not YouTube. (AT&T will charge $45 a month for 4 gigabytes of data.)

    Now, there are two kinds of cellphone networks in this country. They’re known as C.D.M.A. (Verizon and Sprint use this technology) and G.S.M. (the system for AT&T and T-Mobile). Making an iPhone that works on a C.D.M.A. network entailed four adjustments, some of which you won’t like.

    First, Apple moved the volume and Ringer Off switches a fraction of an inch to accommodate the C.D.M.A. antenna inside. It’s not a big deal, but those buttons no longer fit existing AT&T iPhone cases. (Contrary to blogger belief, the redesign doesn’t help with the famous Death Grip issue, in which holding the phone in a certain way makes your signal bars drop. Then again, the problem emerges only when you’re in a very weak signal area, so you’ll see it less often on Verizon. I couldn’t reproduce it at all.)

    A second C.D.M.A. difference: When you exchange long text messages with non-Verizon phones, they get split up into 160-character chunks. G.S.M. phones are smart enough to reconstitute those chunks into one more readable, consolidated message.

    Third: You can’t talk on an C.D.M.A. phone while you’re online. That is, if you’re on a call, you can’t simultaneously check a Web site or send e-mail over the cellular network — and, annoyingly, the Personal Hotspot feature cuts off. (It reconnects when you hang up.)

    If the top of your screen says “3G,” an indication that you’re in a high-speed Internet area of Verizon’s network, incoming calls take priority and interrupt your online connection. If you’re online in an older, 2G area, you stay online and the call goes directly to voice mail.

    It’s not such a big deal. Continuing processes like downloads, Personal Hotspot and GPS navigation resume automatically when you end your call. You can still send text and get messages when you’re on a call. And none of this applies when you’re in a Wi-Fi hot spot; in that case, you can call and surf simultaneously, no problem.

    For business travelers, the fourth C.D.M.A. difference is the most disappointing: not many other countries use C.D.M.A. The Verizon iPhone works in about 40 countries, including Mexico, Canada and China; AT&T phones, on the other hand, work in 220 countries. (In both cases, you pay through the nose if you use them overseas.)

    Still interested? Here are a few final points to ponder before you plunge.

    Even if Verizon’s network is the best in America, its policies and prices are still among the worst. This is the company, after all, that admitted to billing $2 every time you accidentally hit the up-arrow button. (Verizon refunded $52 million and paid the Federal Communications Commission a record $25 million fine.) This is the company that just eliminated its “new phone every two years” discount policy, that just cut its new-phone return policy to 14 days from 30, that doubled its early-termination fee (to $350 if you cancel your two-year contract before it’s up).

    Consider, too, that if surveys are any indication, Verizon can expect an enormous stampede of new iPhone customers. Last time this happened — to AT&T — the weight of all those bandwidth-sucking iPhones swamped the network, causing interruptions that persist to this day. The same thing might happen to Verizon.

    Verizon swears that it’s prepared for the onslaught. Then again, that’s what AT&T said, too.

    Remember, too, that so far, Apple has released a new iPhone model every July. Apple won’t say if there will be an iPhone 5 for Verizon this summer. (“Let’s put it this way: We’re not stupid,” is all an Apple rep would say.) But if it does, and you buy an iPhone 4 now, you’ll be stuck with an outdated phone in only five months.

    Finally, a lot has changed in the years it’s taken the iPhone to come to Verizon. Phones that run Google’s Android software have eaten a lot of the iPhone’s lunch. A huge part of that, of course, was the AT&T factor; people bought Android phones so they could be on Verizon’s network.

    Even now, though, Android phones are superior in some ways. For example, they offer amazingly good spoken GPS navigation, you can dictate text into any text box, and you can get one with a bigger screen. Of course, the iPhone still wins on battery life, simplicity and both the quality and quantity of the app store. (Google doesn’t screen or supervise what’s on the Android store, as Apple does. Some call that a blessing, others a curse.)

    Yes, that’s a lot of footnotes and “yes, buts.” Even so, most people don’t care about overseas compatibility or simultaneous calling and surfing or Verizon’s tactics. They want an iPhone — an iconic, beautiful, fast, elegant iPhone — that doesn’t drop calls.

    Now, after years of pining, they have it at last.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    None for me, thanks. I'm happy enough with AT&T. I have never been impressed with Verizon's customer service, which is a big issue for me. AT&T has been the best of the carriers I have had.

    Here's to hoping AT&T gets even better as the load gets lighter.
  3. #3  
    I think Gruber said it best:

    Verizon sells phones. They will continue to sell phones. They will continue to own and push (and control) the Droid brand. The iPhone, though, is a phone they don’t need to own, push, or control. Apple will sell it for them. Verizon just needs to sell their core competency: cellular networking.
    There's a disconnection between Apple and Verizon, and that's sales. Verizon has absolutely zero say when it comes to the iPhone, they just support it on their network. As far as I know, that's a first for Verizon.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    None for me, thanks. I'm happy enough with AT&T. I have never been impressed with Verizon's customer service, which is a big issue for me. AT&T has been the best of the carriers I have had.

    Here's to hoping AT&T gets even better as the load gets lighter.
    Customer service isn't a factor. I don't go into AT&T stores, i don't call them much if at all. I just pay my bill.

    As for lighter load? I don't see that happening either. They'll add back way more than they would lose to V.

    I don't have Verizon in my area so that's the dealbreaker for me. But even if i did, Verizon's 3G is much slower and doesn't allow for data and voice. That's huge. With AT&T, you can add more than two people to a call, not so with Verizon.

    Speed differences is a problem that will get even worse in the summer when Apple releases a HSPA+ iphone 5. Verizon's LTE customers won't see an iphone for quite some time. Want Facetime without wifi, want to upload video in a reasonable time? Verizon's slow speeds and cdma tech will limit what you can do.

    Most of these reviewers blow up the issue of dropped calls. It's never been a problem in my neck of the woods.
  5. #5  
    i live in cali and used to live in San Fran and travel to new york. so AT&T is crap. so good review.
  6. #6  
    The ANTENNA has changed / fixed silently. Blaming only the AT&T is not right...

    TechCrunch Review: The Name’s iPhone. Verizon iPhone.

    Just a small part of the text:

    While Apple won’t talk specifics, presumably, this is a change made to the antenna of the device, which is the metal band that wraps around the iPhone 4. As you’re probably aware, Apple had an antenna issue shortly after the iPhone 4′s launch this past summer. As I’ve said time and time again, the issue was real...

    Best Regards...
    "If A Man Isn't Willing To Take Some Risk For His Opinions, Either His Opinions Are No Good Or He's No Good!" - Ezra Pound (Poet & Critic)
    (Happy A Lot, As A Good Carioca!)
  7. #7  
    The antenna design was changed because of the switch from GSM to CDMA. Different bands require different antennas. Putting the VZW iPhone CDMA antenna into an AT&T GSM iPhone would not resolve the antenna issues the GSM iPhone has. If anything, it would cause it to function even more poorly or possibly not at all.

    I agree with the overall conclusion of the article. The benefits that GSM provides over CDMA--simultaneous data/voice, able to use in Europe--are not nearly as important as call reliability and call quality are. If only there was a CDMA carrier that did not charge as much as VZW or have as restrictive terms of service regarding data usage... Oh yeah, I have Sprint. iPhone? Meh. Wouldn't buy it even if Sprint carried it.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rnp View Post
    The ANTENNA has changed / fixed silently. Blaming only the AT&T is not right...

    TechCrunch Review: The Name’s iPhone. Verizon iPhone.

    Just a small part of the text:




    Best Regards...
    i think you missed bolding the biggest word "presumably." The author is presuming. He's spectulation that that is why there is a change. He has not proof and no statements from the maker, Apple, that they did anything other then go from gsm to cdma. So i'm not sure how you can definitely say they "fixed it silently." They changed it. that's a fax. Whether they fixed anything seems as the author says, a presumption.
  9. #9  
    Just to add some humor to the situation (from article on phonearena):

    some poor shlubs in Charlotte who stayed up until 3 am to order their iphone, got a phone with an actual ESN that did not match the box or paperwork (phone was sealed).
    So their phone had a Chicago area code and who knows where the phone is that matches the ESN on their box?

    Naturally, Verizon can't do anything for them because the iphone isn't officially out yet.

    Big question: how many sealed iphone boxes have this mixup problem? Things could get really hot over at the BigRed...

    Is Verizon messing up customer's iPhone 4 pre-orders? - Phone Arena
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post

    Here's to hoping AT&T gets even better as the load gets lighter.
    Well you can lower the divisor but when you're dividing zero, you're still going to get zero no matter what number you divide by it by...
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post

    snip...Naturally, Verizon can't do anything for them because the iphone isn't officially out yet.
    Not officially out? When does it become official, 'cause I had three users come up to me today with their Verizon iPhone asking if I could get their contacts of their old Blackberries. It was officially in their hands, delivered by the postman.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    snip...besides they like to disable way to many advanced features...
    Yes, they may disable features on other phones, slap their logo on it and such, but not on the iPhone. It's just on their network. Old "Uncle" Steve is just allowing them to sell it so more billions can fill the coffers of Apple.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Just to add some humor to the situation (from article on phonearena):

    some poor shlubs in Charlotte who stayed up until 3 am to order their iphone, got a phone with an actual ESN that did not match the box or paperwork (phone was sealed).
    So their phone had a Chicago area code and who knows where the phone is that matches the ESN on their box?

    Naturally, Verizon can't do anything for them because the iphone isn't officially out yet.

    Big question: how many sealed iphone boxes have this mixup problem? Things could get really hot over at the BigRed...

    Is Verizon messing up customer's iPhone 4 pre-orders? - Phone Arena
    One out of 500,000? Now that's a huge trend. Must have been a slow news day for PhoneArena - that, or they're an AT&T fan boy site:
    Quote Originally Posted by phonearena
    However, not everything is roses in Verizon's iPhone land, as it appears that some customer's orders are being mixed-up. One person, J, who sent us the photos below, says that he ordered the 32GB model, and that is what is shown on he box, but the iPhone is actually a 16GB model and the MEID is registered under someone else's name.
    I've had a lot more delivery order errors from amazon and have purchased no where near 500,000 items from them.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    Most of these reviewers blow up the issue of dropped calls. It's never been a problem in my neck of the woods.
    Reviewers usually live in big cities hence horrible reception and overloaded networks, but the entire country reads their reviews. The really need to put disclaimers on their opinions based on regional experiences.

    Really good article by the way. About as fair as it could be.
  15. #15  
    I live in the suburbs of Louisville, KY... Hardly a big city. My partner was on AT&T forever and was scared to leave because of giving up her plan and her rollover minutes, but the dropped calls finally pushed her over the edge. So it's not just the big cities (NYC, Chicago, etc.) that have issues with AT&T. She's on Sprint now. Calls sound much better now, they don't drop, and with mobile-to-mobile being free on Sprint, she doesn't need rollover minutes. Also she is able to have insurance on her expensive smartphone now (AT&T refused to insure their most expensive phones), and pays less than she did with AT&T.

    Due to my own personal experience, I have come to the opinion that AT&T just plain sucks as a carrier. YMMV. I think if it were not for the iPhone exclusivity, they would be a sinking ship. Not surprised at all that they have announced free mobile-to-mobile in the wake of losing exclusivity. I think they will eventually do much more than that in order to attempt to stay competitive after losing the life boat that was Apple.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    I live in the suburbs of Louisville, KY... Hardly a big city. My partner was on AT&T forever and was scared to leave because of giving up her plan and her rollover minutes, but the dropped calls finally pushed her over the edge. So it's not just the big cities (NYC, Chicago, etc.) that have issues with AT&T. She's on Sprint now. Calls sound much better now, they don't drop, and with mobile-to-mobile being free on Sprint, she doesn't need rollover minutes. Also she is able to have insurance on her expensive smartphone now (AT&T refused to insure their most expensive phones), and pays less than she did with AT&T.

    Due to my own personal experience, I have come to the opinion that AT&T just plain sucks as a carrier. YMMV. I think if it were not for the iPhone exclusivity, they would be a sinking ship. Not surprised at all that they have announced free mobile-to-mobile in the wake of losing exclusivity. I think they will eventually do much more than that in order to attempt to stay competitive after losing the life boat that was Apple.
    Really? AT&T is pretty solid in Louisville from my experience with much faster data speeds. AT&T also offers free mobile to any mobile calling now.

    Verizon iPhone turnout thin | The Courier-Journal | courier-journal.com

    Doesn't look like there were many lining up for a Verizon iphone either.

    The scene at 7 a.m. as the Apple Store in Oxmoor Center opened three hours early was nothing like last year when hundreds flooded the mall for a new version of the phone. Ropes had been set up in the mall near the store to help guide a crowd Tuesday, but only one customer was waiting when the doors opened.
  17. #17  
    Much faster data speeds? Compared to Sprint? Find that hard to believe. She was stuck on EDGE with AT&T, and it was effing horrible. Couldn't even get data to connect inside the house--had to turn on WiFi to sync with her Exchange server unless she was outdoors. Our house is fairly new (2008) so that might have something to do with it, but no such problems with the EVO she has now.

    IMO the improved sound quality alone was more than worth the switch. I didn't have to use her data, but I did have to put up with the poor sound quality when I called her. I don't understand why that doesn't get talked about nearly as much as data speeds. It is a phone, after all. Back in the time of dinosaurs when I was choosing my first cell phone, that was the most important thing to me since I was dropping my land line. AT&T's sound quality is just the worst of all the carriers, IMO. That also had something to do with her moving to Sprint--she got really tired of hearing me complain about her crappy-sounding phone.

    I think the low turnout for the VZW iPhone should have been expected. People will move to VZW as their AT&T plans expire. Everyone that wanted an iPhone badly enough to wait in line for one already has one... on AT&T.

    Also--and this is purely conjecture--I think Louisville is a bit ahead of the curve when it comes to technology, and I think the iPhone just doesn't have the same appeal here that it may have elsewhere. Louisville is chock full of technology companies and tech-heads to work at them, myself included. Most everyone I know (friends, colleagues, clients) has or wants the EVO. Myself and one other friend are the lone holdouts on WebOS, and we're not exactly married to it. We both ended up with Pixis because of the form factor, not the OS. I'll probably be entering back into my love/hate relationship with MS after this affair with the Pixi is over.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  18. #18  
    The saddest part is when Cingular was here in so cali, Cingular's coverage was awesome. Then they merged with ATT, sold of towers to T-mobile and ATT service went to crap. The CS rep who I have had for years PacBell>CIngular>ATT said that the reason is that they moved to ATT frequency which does not penetrate walls well. If iphone 5 was available on Verizon, I think it would fly off the shelves.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    Not surprised at all that they have announced free mobile-to-mobile in the wake of losing exclusivity. I think they will eventually do much more than that in order to attempt to stay competitive after losing the life boat that was Apple.
    Called it!!

    AT&T handing over 1000 free rollover minutes to all of its customers -- Engadget
    Touchscreens are a fad.

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