Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 38 of 38
  1.    #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    Bottom line, i could replace a tablet with a smartphone (since its basically the same thing) a lot easier than i could replace a laptop with a tablet. So if A can replace B, and we're trying to get B to replace C. Then why not make the jump of A replacing C?
    The jump from A to C may be technically possible but has some human factors issues that have yet to be solved. Years ago when cellphones were really getting popular and affordable an old college professor and I were chatting about how small the device could become. We concluded that while the technology could progress to a point were cellphones were the size of a grain of rice, we would need to solve the human factors in order to get it to work. Things like voice recognition, etc. would be needed to interact with a device that small.

    Tablets with 9" - 12" screens are close enough to desktop/laptop screens to remain usable with current human factor solutions (though they do introduce their own issues as many are pointing out here). It becomes harder to deal with the smaller screens.
  2.    #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    There is an argument out there that the youngest generation of computer users will grow up thinking about physical keyboards the same way that most of us think about manual typewriters. They will ask things like "Did you really have to press a button each time you wanted to enter a single letter? Didn't that hurt your hands after a while?"
    And they will probably pick up the mouse and say " ."
    Last edited by taharka; 01/26/2011 at 11:42 AM. Reason: link
  3. ToddK's Avatar
    Posts
    666 Posts
    Global Posts
    905 Global Posts
    #23  
    The vast majority of current and future users could, (and IMO, will), be very happy with a tablet for day to day use.

    Most of what they do, email, web browsing/shopping and watching video/tv/movies and listening to music, (web-based radio / personal music lib), and e-reading,is done very well by tablet type devices.

    flexible (expandable), displays could make things very interesting, too.
  4. rlbrooks's Avatar
    Posts
    11 Posts
    Global Posts
    27 Global Posts
    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    I'm not sure the home stereo vs ipod is a good comparison. A home stereo is made up of many components and there is usually a device that plays purchased music in that mix (like a cd player). The iPod simply becomes another component in the system, not the system itself. It's like comparing a blue-ray player to a home theatre system rather than comparing it to a dvd player.

    Now if you want to compare iPods to a boombox or an alarm/clock/radio or something like that (a standalone device), I think that would be closer to the point.
    Fair point...The more accurate comparison would be stating that the boombox didn't replace the home stereo. I will just stick with my toaster oven and range stove comparison, and retire from analogies for the rest of day.

    sent from my Sprint EVO
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToddK View Post
    The vast majority of current and future users could, (and IMO, will), be very happy with a tablet for day to day use.

    Most of what they do, email, web browsing/shopping and watching video/tv/movies and listening to music, (web-based radio / personal music lib), and e-reading,is done very well by tablet type devices.

    flexible (expandable), displays could make things very interesting, too.
    My issue is for things like document editing, i've yet to see a touch implmentation that is as accurate or consistant as a mouse pointer. Sure, thats another add on you could make to a tablet...but then as you keep adding things on...why not just get a laptop?

    Also, you would have to consider some people still only run wired networks. My apartment complex has way to many wireless networks and even moving mine to a near empty channel, i still did not have reliable signal in my bedroom...i ended up just running ethernet cords to my computer and my two xbox360s. This also gives me perfect HD streaming without any lag or hiccup from my desktop.

    I mean, i see where people are coming from....but i dunno..i have to see more integration and progression to agree it could become the primary computing method.
  6.    #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    My issue is for things like document editing, i've yet to see a touch implmentation that is as accurate or consistant as a mouse pointer.
    I honestly remember when I thought the mouse was awkward and inaccurate. Then I got used to it and thought trackpads were clumsy. Then I started using the magic pad on my MBP and find the mouse to be awkward again. I think some of this is just part of the normal growing pains we get with adapting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    i have to see more integration and progression to agree it could become the primary computing method.
    That's the key. Maybe i should have phrased the question as "What will it take for tablets to replace desktops/laptops?"

    Like I've said, I don't think we are there yet but I think that's where we are headed.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Maybe i should have phrased the question as "What will it take for tablets to replace desktops/laptops?"
    Simple. When they can do everything desktops/laptops can do.


    My Themes:CLICK HERE
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Isn't the fact that something already exists but is limited one of the biggest reasons people predicted the iPad would be a huge failure? Couldn't those existing docking stations be made better? How is it that laptops have been able to get such a strong foothold despite not having as many ports or options as a full desktop? Can these problems not be solved at all?
    I, for one, never predicted the failure of the iPad. But I would have (had I been asked) predicted that it would never complete replace desktop computers - whether they be branded Apple or some other mfg. I don't they will, and I'm sure they haven't yet.

    Yes, a docking station could be built to have extra features, but you reach a pont of diminishing returns. I'll give you real life example, then a hypothetical.

    My docking station, at the time I bought it, was about $250. There were cheeper Dell docking stations that did less, but cost about $125. I chose the one that gave me dual video outputs (even though one is analog and one is digital, it works for me). That was all I really needed, but the cheaper one only had VGA output. It had other features I liked, but weren't necessities - comm port and many more USB ports.

    The extra expense wasn't all I "paid" for the features it came with. It also used an interna l power supply that was stronger than the smaller power supplies that came with the other unit. It was also about twice as high, and twice as deep - to accomodate the room for the expansion card and I'm sure in part for the power supply.

    So, cost me more, took up more desk space. That's OK though, my needs weren't great.

    But, what if I was one of those guys that really wanted to be able to have 9 monitors displayed on a wall, all showing one big "view" of the desktop? Windows supports that. It would be extremely difficult to convince Dell to produce a docking station with room for 8 more expansion cards.

    Go a step further. I ahve a 12 year old grandson that is extremely into video gaming. He's got a setup where he overclocks his CPU, water-cools it, and has two video cards teamed together to increase GPU processing speed. I won't pretend to tell you that I completely understand what he's doing, because I've never been that much into gaming, but I don't think he's going to replace his setup with a laptop or tablet.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    I'm not sure the home stereo vs ipod is a good comparison. A home stereo is made up of many components and there is usually a device that plays purchased music in that mix (like a cd player). The iPod simply becomes another component in the system, not the system itself. It's like comparing a blue-ray player to a home theatre system rather than comparing it to a dvd player.

    Now if you want to compare iPods to a boombox or an alarm/clock/radio or something like that (a standalone device), I think that would be closer to the point.
    Ooops, missed this one.

    Sorry, I disagree. I think it's a very good comparison. Some folks' home system was a boom box, and the iPad replaced it nicely. Others, had the best of each component, and the iPad was an addition.

    Some folks have a pretty standard desktop PC (if they have a desktop at all). For them, a tablet might make a great replacement. Others though, have the best video card they can find added in, the best sound card added in, the biggest DASD array they can put together, along with card/devices that allow different memory cards to be put in, and multiple DVD/BlueRay devices.

    Those mack truck dricers would feel pretty confined with a tablet.
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    Not so simple. How about when they can do everything a given user needs a computer to do?
    Then that given user might be ready to switch. The others will have to wait, or change their needs.
  11.    #31  
    It does not have to do everything for everyone. I'm not asking about a complete replacement of every computer for every possible use-case. I'm sure there is someone out there holding on to his trusty typewriter despite the existence of computers. Maybe he has specific electrical power consumption requirements to meet. Here is my question in context from the OP.
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Tablets are in now. Accessories are being produced for them. Apps are being written for them. As their ecosystems mature, is it possible that tablets will become the standard computing device one day?
    I'm talking standard as in majority, not 100%.
  12. #32  
    As ive said before. I think as more productivity apps and basic apps used on computers come to play, and gaming becomes stronger, this type of device will start to replace laptops for many users needs . The more it does the more people will be affected. Price vs function will also come into play. The currebt tablet is more expensive then a netbook but slightly less functional but i beleive the netbook and ereaders will be replaced by tablets soon and many times of new markets can grow. The cool thing about a tablet, is its a device u can lug around and compute on even on thr go. And last long. These are iseal in offices, medical places enginering and schools because one can simply take it out of a case and check it while a laptop doesnt offer that kind of computer portability. Studying to be an ar hitect, this kind of device would surely be helpfull on the feild. So many jobs couls really benidit from this type of portable device. So i believe this will replace ereaders, netbooks, spill into the computer market, but also create new markets
  13. #33  
    I have ditched the desktop over 5 years ago and have been using a laptop for personal and business use every since. For my use, I see a tablet beneficial to me when I travel and around my home but unless the specs for the tablets increase over the coming years, I don't see them replacing laptops.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Tablets are in now. Accessories are being produced for them. Apps are being written for them. As their ecosystems mature, is it possible that tablets will become the standard computing device one day?
    hopefully. Depends on the screen size(s) you want, but hopefully tablets will be able to do anything a computer can do, and still have great/better battery life.
  15. #35  
    Desktops will always remain; and there are two groups who need a desktop...
    1. Hardcore gamers 2. Traders
    gamers and traders need the very fast high powered machine, and need to use multiple screens (usually 3+)

    I could see tablets replacing netbooks though, or at least the basic 10.1"screen ones.
    but not the nicer more powerful ones say around 13.3" screen.

    I actually think standard sized laptops should be obsolete. think about it for around the price of a really good laptop that can do everything one would need it to. I can get a excellent desktop and decent 13.3" inch minilaptop/netbook (whatever u wanna call it).

    That would be what i would want; most of the time I am computing I can use a desktop, and is necessity when gaming or doing some trading. Then I would have, a really small laptop for basic needs and things that a tablet currently can't do. That i would take with me on trips if needed, or when I need specifically need portable computing... and a small 7" tab to carry with me like when going to classes or work and stuff.
  16. stockh's Avatar
    Posts
    401 Posts
    Global Posts
    403 Global Posts
    #36  
    If I can work as efficiently on a tablet as I could on my laptop then I may consider one, until then, I'm making do with my too small screen pre for basic email, mesg, internet and my laptop for everything else.
  17. #37  
    Tablets don't have quick install
  18.    #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by casiouser View Post
    Tablets don't have quick install
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions