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  1.    #1  
  2. #2  
    Can't open the link on my phone but what's that going to mean? Not like they're just going to shut down all Android phones or anything. Big fines? Oracle takeover? Even if they did huge fines, what's the interpretation of huge? Sort of like the "HUGE" fine Bell Mobility got for outsourcing their telemarketing and breaking Canada's "Do Not Call List". 1 Million dollars for that fine....big deal, that didn't even make Bell (Ontario Teacher's Pension Plan) bat an eye.
  3. #3  
    wow I peeped that, sounds like Googles Android might be in some reallly reallllly big trouble smh.
  4. #4  
    found a different source on same article:

    Oracle's claims that Google copied Sun's Java code without permission in Android may have gained fuel on Friday. A separate search by Florian Mueller of the code (ZIP) has found more files than Oracle itself cited that appear to lift code directly. Among them, six files attached to Android 2.2 and 3.0 appear to have been extracted from Sun's Java source code using a decompiler and simply grafted into the just-in-time Dalvik engine Android uses at its root.

    About 37 files were even marked as "proprietary/confidential" Sun files, and a separate file included in the code served as a copyright notice from Sun urging users not to distribute the material. Google has since claimed that Oracle was hiding code to make it look like more copying was involved, but Mueller noted that even open-sourced, GPL 2 parts code could have violated Sun (and now Oracle) rights after the latter's code was distributed without its consent. He suggested that Oracle not only had a case but may have been conservative in presenting its evidence.

    "It seems to me that Oracle has not even presented the tip of the iceberg in its amended complaint," Mueller said. "The discovery process could be very fruitful for Oracle, and may become dreadful for Google."

    While Google has accused Oracle of being opportunistic and arguing for proprietary Java code rights only after it bought Sun and could profit from licensing, the discoveries could have significant ramifications for Android. Google has regularly tried to claim the high ground over Apple by touting Android's openness. The findings nonetheless imply that it took code it either knew was closed-source or that was improperly taken when while open.



    Read more: [url= evidence shows Google may have copied Oracle in Android | Electronista[/url]

    I really don't care too much what happens to either corporations, hopefully the end users don't get screwed as a result of whatever happens.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by sledge007 View Post
    Can't open the link on my phone but what's that going to mean? Not like they're just going to shut down all Android phones or anything. Big fines? Oracle takeover? Even if they did huge fines, what's the interpretation of huge? Sort of like the "HUGE" fine Bell Mobility got for outsourcing their telemarketing and breaking Canada's "Do Not Call List". 1 Million dollars for that fine....big deal, that didn't even make Bell (Ontario Teacher's Pension Plan) bat an eye.
    If proven, it could mean one of 3 things:

    1) They reach some sort of cross-license deal
    2) Google writes a HUGE check to Oracle and/or replaces the offending code with another method to accomplish whatever they are doing with the offending code
    3) Google stops delivering Android until they can complete #1 or #2

    1) is what usually happens
    2) is what happened to Microsoft when they were sued over something they were doing with Active-X controls.
    3) Microsoft was once ordered to stop selling MS-Word in the US over a dispute like this. And remember RIM? They were forced to delay new product shipments and only a 90 stay by a judge kept them from having to stop distributing their products. During that period RIM settled the dispute and paid over $600m to NTP for license to the patents.

    Example of #2
    http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Windows/Mic...edia-Handling/

    Examples of #3
    Microsoft Loses Patent Dispute Over XML Use in Word -- Microsoft Certified Professional Magazine Online

    HowStuffWorks "BlackBerry Patent Dispute"
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by sledge007 View Post
    I really don't care too much what happens to either corporations, hopefully the end users don't get screwed as a result of whatever happens.
    This!


    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  7. #7  
    If Oracle wins, they'd be fools not to cash in somehow on the popularity of Android. It would be idiotic for them to try to shut it down entirely.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    If proven, it could mean one of 3 things:

    1) They reach some sort of cross-license deal
    2) Google writes a HUGE check to Oracle and/or replaces the offending code with another method to accomplish whatever they are doing with the offending code
    3) Google stops delivering Android until they can complete #1 or #2

    1) is what usually happens
    2) is what happened to Microsoft when they were sued over something they were doing with Active-X controls.
    3) Microsoft was once ordered to stop selling MS-Word in the US over a dispute like this. And remember RIM? They were forced to delay new product shipments and only a 90 stay by a judge kept them from having to stop distributing their products. During that period RIM settled the dispute and paid over $600m to NTP for license to the patents.

    Example of #2
    Microsoft Bows to Eolas, Revamps IEs Multimedia Handling - Windows - News & Reviews - eWeek.com

    Examples of #3
    Microsoft Loses Patent Dispute Over XML Use in Word -- Microsoft Certified Professional Magazine Online

    HowStuffWorks "BlackBerry Patent Dispute"
    1 would be better for all IMO.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  9. #9  
    In any scenario (outside of the case getting dismissed) it will mean the end of Android as a "free" OS for companies to use which will make the cost of creating Android devices suddenly go way up due to licensing fees they will then have to charge.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by HelloNNNewman View Post
    In any scenario (outside of the case getting dismissed) it will mean the end of Android as a "free" OS for companies to use which will make the cost of creating Android devices suddenly go way up due to licensing fees they will then have to charge.
    I think that statement is a bit to broad.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by HelloNNNewman View Post
    In any scenario (outside of the case getting dismissed) it will mean the end of Android as a "free" OS for companies to use which will make the cost of creating Android devices suddenly go way up due to licensing fees they will then have to charge.
    I wish this would happen, but cross-licensing is much more likely unless Google has nothing that Oracle wants...
  12. #12  
    Then that could mean more quality devices survive.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  13. #13  
    I don't see why that would be. Android is profitable due to advertising and Google's ability to leverage user data. They aren't giving it away to be nice, but to make money. They will have to share some of that profit, but not necessarily add licensing fees to the revenue mix.

    Quote Originally Posted by HelloNNNewman View Post
    In any scenario (outside of the case getting dismissed) it will mean the end of Android as a "free" OS for companies to use which will make the cost of creating Android devices suddenly go way up due to licensing fees they will then have to charge.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by HelloNNNewman View Post
    In any scenario (outside of the case getting dismissed) it will mean the end of Android as a "free" OS for companies to use which will make the cost of creating Android devices suddenly go way up due to licensing fees they will then have to charge.
    Android - as you see it on most phones - is not a "free OS" for either manufacturers or carriers. A good deal of the code exists within the AOSP (Android Open Source Project), but Google's proprietary apps that make anybody care like Maps, Gmail, Google Nav, etc. all have licensing fees involved. This is why HP or Apple or Nokia can't simply have their engineers do a port of Google Nav and slap it on WebOS as a sorely-needed native navigation solution.

    This doesn't even take into account the development that goes into custom skins, manufacturer apps, carrier apps, converting new versions of Android, and so on and so forth.

    Whatever decision or settlement happens in this case, it will not change the fact that Android is the only modern and mature touch-oriented OS that offers a broad selection of manufacturers, carriers, form factors, and price points to choose from while also offering a huge ecosystem of apps and content.

    Nobody else offers this. No one else is even trying to. That is why it will continue to succeed for the foreseeable future.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    Nobody else offers this. No one else is even trying to. That is why it will continue to succeed for the foreseeable future.
    So true. The Oracle claims are probably 3-5 years from coming to trial. A lot can happen in either company in the intervening years.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    If proven, it could mean one of 3 things:

    1) They reach some sort of cross-license deal
    2) Google writes a HUGE check to Oracle and/or replaces the offending code with another method to accomplish whatever they are doing with the offending code
    3) Google stops delivering Android until they can complete #1 or #2
    ...
    Google has great licenses to offer but in addition they could hook services exclusively into Oracle. That is how Oracle could make big money. A billion dollar settlement is nothing compared to getting on the Android gravy train.

    Oracle could win big on this...and so could Google.

    The people getting phones at Best Buy this weekend will never know it is going on. Just like they didn't know last weekend.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    Android - as you see it on most phones - is not a "free OS" for either manufacturers or carriers. A good deal of the code exists within the AOSP (Android Open Source Project), but Google's proprietary apps that make anybody care like Maps, Gmail, Google Nav, etc. all have licensing fees involved...
    They are definitely licensed, but does Google actually charge for them? My understanding was that they license them for use within Android devices to retain ownership and control, but that they don't charge for including them on an Android phone. Can you point me to a link that says they charge for it? I wasn't able to find one in one quick-n-lazy trip to Google.
  18. #18  
    Where's Dr. Ezor?

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