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  1.    #81  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    I'm guessing we are in agreement here. Correct? The phone does not automatically become less usable simply because there is a new version of the OS.
    Yes we are .. But as was stated earlier, fragmentation (of this sort) effects devs, apps and in the end users.. Contrary to populiar belief on these boards, most customers take their contract to term... Of those customers , the ones that are on smartphones need their phone to be reliable first, and if these phones are being bought by a business for their staff, from an IT perpective need to be the same , they can't simply tell the boss go get an android as they can a bberry (im not in IT , maybe they can, bear with me), even OS6 is basically exactly the same as 5 or 4 or 3 even... But if as a bus grows their IT's policy may change and now call for feature X which is supported by android but only in vers "Peanut Butter and Jelly with Marshmallow Fluff" , which is not supported on the phones they got because all androids are created equal no? Guess what, NOPE!

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  2.    #82  
    Quote Originally Posted by cnote1287 View Post
    My toshiba laptop from early 2006 that has a 1.83ghz first generation duo core, and 2 gig of ram is running window 7 just fine right now
    Lol.. Same with my old dell.. And it's single core lol

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  3. #83  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    Yes we are .. But as was stated earlier, fragmentation (of this sort) effects devs, apps and in the end users.. Contrary to populiar belief on these boards, most customers take their contract to term... Of those customers , the ones that are on smartphones need their phone to be reliable first, and if these phones are being bought by a business for their staff, from an IT perpective need to be the same , they can't simply tell the boss go get an android as they can a bberry (im not in IT , maybe they can, bear with me), even OS6 is basically exactly the same as 5 or 4 or 3 even... But if as a bus grows their IT's policy may change and now call for feature X which is supported by android but only in vers "Peanut Butter and Jelly with Marshmallow Fluff" , which is not supported on the phones they got because all androids are created equal no? Guess what, NOPE![/i]
    You've just described all technology. As soon as an IT department makes a big purchase, they're locked in for a period of time. If they choose to make a policy change that makes their purchase obsolete, then I suspect there will be significant turnover in that IT department for being so uninformed.

    You mention BB OS 6. It is backward compatible with OS 5 and 4, but it also possesses capabilities that are unavailable in those older OSes. Same goes for Windows 7 or OS X 10.6. Technologies evolve, some more rapidly than others. I think you'll find that there are a lot more people on the AndroidCentral boards who are happy with the rapid evolution of AndroidOS than there are PreCentral board members who are stuck with a stagnant, slow to evolve, seemingly unresponsive webOS product.

    As I've said before, fragmentation is a term coined by slowly evolving technologies to distract potential customers away from more rapidly evolving technologies.
  4. #84  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    You've just described all technology. As soon as an IT department makes a big purchase, they're locked in for a period of time. If they choose to make a policy change that makes their purchase obsolete, then I suspect there will be significant turnover in that IT department for being so uninformed.

    You mention BB OS 6. It is backward compatible with OS 5 and 4, but it also possesses capabilities that are unavailable in those older OSes. Same goes for Windows 7 or OS X 10.6. Technologies evolve, some more rapidly than others. I think you'll find that there are a lot more people on the AndroidCentral boards who are happy with the rapid evolution of AndroidOS than there are PreCentral board members who are stuck with a stagnant, slow to evolve, seemingly unresponsive webOS product.

    As I've said before, fragmentation is a term coined by slowly evolving technologies to distract potential customers away from more rapidly evolving technologies.
    Maybe if you have the money to buy a new phone every six months, or be left behind in the land of little to none updates and outdated hardware.
  5. #85  
    Quote Originally Posted by Weaser999 View Post
    Maybe if you have the money to buy a new phone every six months, or be left behind in the land of little to none updates and outdated hardware.
    Not all are in the updates problem territory.

    Sent from my eVo
    Sent from my favorite gadget!
  6. #86  
    Quote Originally Posted by Weaser999 View Post
    Maybe if you have the money to buy a new phone every six months, or be left behind in the land of little to none updates and outdated hardware.
    Your comment seems to presume that a device is outdated the day you purchase it. If your phone meets your requirements on purchase day (which it should), why would it not meet those same requirements after 6 months, or a year? What you're inferring is your requirements are evolving and your perfectly fine phone from 6 months ago no longer meets your current, new requirements. So I have to ask:

    1. If you can't afford to upgrade, then why is it the responsibility of the device manufacturer to make sure your new and evolving requirements be met?

    2. How long should the manufacturer be required to continue meeting your continuously changing requirements at no additional cost to you?

    Does caveat emptor no longer apply?
  7. cgk
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    #87  
    Your comment seems to presume that a device is outdated the day you purchase it. If your phone meets your requirements on purchase day (which it should), why would it not meet those same requirements after 6 months, or a year?
    And how many regular users care to start with? The only time they research phones is when they buy a new one, something is either available to them on the device or it's not.

    I'm constantly staggered by the number of smart-phone users I encounter who's contact information is still on the SIM card because they have absolutely no idea that they can sync this stuff to gmail or whatever. The idea that the mass market is upset or concerned about fragmentation I think is a bit of a myth, the only phones they are concerned about is either 1) what phone is available at their preferred carrier (contract) or 2) what's in their budget (PAY) or 3) a mix of the two.
  8. #88  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mattykinsx View Post
    Honeycomb is only for Tablets.

    - Google releases the updates to manufacturers that then go ahead and release them OTA [if they so choose]

    - No current phones will get Honeycomb since it's Tablet based.
    I watched a video with Matias Duarte on Engadget.com and I believe Honeycomb -- or something like it -- will be on phones at some point. It might get a new name, but he couldn't say. All he kept saying is there are more surprises.

    Here is the video. Exclusive interview: Google's Matias Duarte talks Honeycomb, tablets, and the future of Android -- Engadget


    Now about fragmentation, I don't get why people think Android is fragmented. Android is updated every so often, and it shouldn't really effect anyone if you do or don't have that update. I mean, what is different then BB OS not being updated on the 8330? Wow, Blackberry is now fragmented? I don't think so.

    I just noticed the original guy who posted to your thread also gave a link to this video, just not directly like I did. I thought it was two different interviews! Anyway ... watch the video if you haven't all ready!
  9. #89  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Your comment seems to presume that a device is outdated the day you purchase it. If your phone meets your requirements on purchase day (which it should), why would it not meet those same requirements after 6 months, or a year? What you're inferring is your requirements are evolving and your perfectly fine phone from 6 months ago no longer meets your current, new requirements. So I have to ask:

    1. If you can't afford to upgrade, then why is it the responsibility of the device manufacturer to make sure your new and evolving requirements be met?

    2. How long should the manufacturer be required to continue meeting your continuously changing requirements at no additional cost to you?

    Does caveat emptor no longer apply?
    If I can't afford to upgrade, then I am not able to run the most current software for my phone regarding apps. If phones keep changing every six months, and it can't run the newer apps, i'll be left with a handful of apps that run on my minimum spec requirements.

    Second, I think the mfg should at least back it's product for 2 years minimum. If not, then I'll look for a mfg that does back up it's hardware... cough.. apple... cough. I don't like feeling like i'm constantly missing out on great things the minute a purchase a phone. If the mfg won't back my phone, then I won't back the mfg.

    I honestly don't really feel the urgent need to upgrade my current Palm Pre minus. I've had it for 1.5 years now and it runs fine and runs every app in the catalogue. The mfg's will play on our needs to have the biggest and best and profit from our impulsiveness, just like in the PC world. Pay top dollar for the newest CPU or save a few hundred and buy lower end, but then run the risk of not being able to run software in the near future.. so in essence, we are forced to upgrade in order to run the newer apps. The only one who wins in this situation is the mfg.
  10. #90  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    And how many regular users care to start with? The only time they research phones is when they buy a new one, something is either available to them on the device or it's not.

    I'm constantly staggered by the number of smart-phone users I encounter who's contact information is still on the SIM card because they have absolutely no idea that they can sync this stuff to gmail or whatever. The idea that the mass market is upset or concerned about fragmentation I think is a bit of a myth, the only phones they are concerned about is either 1) what phone is available at their preferred carrier (contract) or 2) what's in their budget (PAY) or 3) a mix of the two.
    As the mass market becomes more informed it will become more of a problem. The average joe won't care about updates, but once they start coming onto these forums, the light bulb turns on. Then they realize.. hey, i'm getting the shaft!
  11. #91  
    Quote Originally Posted by verwon View Post
    Not all are in the updates problem territory.

    Sent from my eVo
    True, but then we are at the mercy of the carriers. Would you be happy if all of a sudden HTC says... sorry, we are no longer providing updates for your phone, it's already been out for 1 year. If they did that, I'd be ****ed!
  12. #92  
    Quote Originally Posted by Weaser999 View Post
    If I can't afford to upgrade, then I am not able to run the most current software for my phone regarding apps. If phones keep changing every six months, and it can't run the newer apps, i'll be left with a handful of apps that run on my minimum spec requirements.

    Second, I think the mfg should at least back it's product for 2 years minimum. If not, then I'll look for a mfg that does back up it's hardware... cough.. apple... cough. I don't like feeling like i'm constantly missing out on great things the minute a purchase a phone. If the mfg won't back my phone, then I won't back the mfg.

    I honestly don't really feel the urgent need to upgrade my current Palm Pre minus. I've had it for 1.5 years now and it runs fine and runs every app in the catalogue. The mfg's will play on our needs to have the biggest and best and profit from our impulsiveness, just like in the PC world. Pay top dollar for the newest CPU or save a few hundred and buy lower end, but then run the risk of not being able to run software in the near future.. so in essence, we are forced to upgrade in order to run the newer apps. The only one who wins in this situation is the mfg.
    I think you are creating an artificial situation here to prove your point. The reality is most people are happy with their phone regardless of what new software version is available or what new phones are on the market. People in these forums are closer to the exception rather than the norm.
  13. #93  
    Quote Originally Posted by Weaser999 View Post
    As the mass market becomes more informed it will become more of a problem. The average joe won't care about updates, but once they start coming onto these forums, the light bulb turns on. Then they realize.. hey, i'm getting the shaft!
    The mass market don't care. The average joe won't start coming to these forums, they don't care. Most people will never feel like they are getting the shaft because they simply buy what they need and move on until their needs have changed or what they bought breaks.

    There is no imminent massive enlightenment in terms of consumers and these products.
  14. cgk
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    #94  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    The mass market don't care. The average joe won't start coming to these forums, they don't care. Most people will never feel like they are getting the shaft because they simply buy what they need and move on until their needs have changed or what they bought breaks.

    There is no imminent massive enlightenment in terms of consumers and these products.
    Indeed, look at PC forums, people are as clueless as ever.
  15. #95  
    Few Windows XP users ever upgraded to Vista. Many PC's (and users) are better off with XP. We are the 5% who upgrade operating systems. To the rest of the world, it is just a computer. When it dies or can't run something, you get a new one.

    It is the same way with Android. There are a lot of phones that will run better on 2.2 than upgrading to Ice Cream. And few users want to even be bothered.

    You heard what Google said again this week. They are on a mad drive to get smartphones down to nearly free. The huge growth is in the pre-paid and "free" phones. They say that the manufacturing cost for a low-end Android is now down to $18. Wal-Mart now sells more HD TV's than anyone and so it will be with smartphones.

    If the updates for phones were available at the carrier websites but not pushed, no more than a few percent would ever update. Users think of a phone as disposable. When you lose it or break it, you replace it. Go to Wal-Mart and pick up another...and some ice cream.
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 01/21/2011 at 05:05 PM.
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