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  1. #41  
    How many apps are you buying?

    Seriously. Desktop/laptops have moved away from application buying outside of certain sectors.

    Take an everyday joe....what is he buying on his PC? he probably got it built by Dell with Office installed.

    Then what else is he going to get? itunes maybe? Firefox if its not installed? Everything else is done in their browser.

    Hence this is my belief this is a MUCH bigger market for casual gaming....but Steam has done it and been doing it for a while. I'm not convinced this will mean anything except i'm sure you'll see Dell or HP trying to do the same....not for a paradigm shift...but for attempts to make some money on software sales.
  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brain Mantis View Post
    How many apps are you buying?

    Seriously. Desktop/laptops have moved away from application buying outside of certain sectors.

    Take an everyday joe....what is he buying on his PC? he probably got it built by Dell with Office installed.

    Then what else is he going to get? itunes maybe? Firefox if its not installed? Everything else is done in their browser.

    Hence this is my belief this is a MUCH bigger market for casual gaming....but Steam has done it and been doing it for a while. I'm not convinced this will mean anything except i'm sure you'll see Dell or HP trying to do the same....not for a paradigm shift...but for attempts to make some money on software sales.
    It is the revolution that Quicken and TurboTax have been waiting for. Thank you, Apple....thank you so much for changing the game....
  3. #43  
    Of course having a centralized repository for buying software isn't a new concept. Like most things Apple, though, the positives of the Mac App Store are in the little details. I'm not convinced this is a big deal just yet but I don't have a problem with dragging icons out of dmgs either.

    There's a lot to like about the Mac App Store though. App stores encourage shopping and that's a good thing for developers -- especially since Apple has made the porting process from iOS to OS X incredibly simple. Recognizing existing apps that are already installed is a nice and unexpected surprise too.

    It's not revolutionary stuff but I'm glad it exists even if I'm not sure how much I'll use it.
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    #44  
    I'm still very content with my Dual-2 Ghz Power Mac G5, but from what I understand, this new app' store is for Intel Mac's only. Heh. My Core Duo MacBook has lived and died since I bought my Power Mac. I remember promises of universal binaries and how easy they were to make. I haven't seen a PowerPC application in a long time. So, basically I could care less about their new app' store.
    Last edited by Cooknn; 01/06/2011 at 03:14 PM.
  5. #45  
    Granted this is just one developer but:



    Not bad considering the store's been live for all of 4 hours.
  6. #46  
    Well thats when most people are going to hop on to download stuff haha.
  7. #47  
    Yeah, but the cool thing is the Mac App Store gives people a reason (and a method) to try out new apps. I'd imagine a lot of the new Evernote users didn't even know it existed until they saw it on the Mac App Store. That type of exposure is invaluable to developers.

    It's kind of like how the iOS App Store created an entirely new type of social networking with Instagram.
  8. #48  
    I just don't see the need for an app store on a device that can already use vastly superior software than simple "apps". I don't see why we need an app for everything on a desktop computer.
  9. #49  
    They're not simple apps, though. It's just normal OS X software. There's stuff like Aperture and Pixelmator and iLife 11 on there along with the games and widgets.
  10. #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    They're not simple apps, though. It's just normal OS X software. There's stuff like Aperture and Pixelmator and iLife 11 on there along with the games and widgets.
    Oh, so it's like taking a sandwich with burnt crusts, flipping the burnt crust over to the unburned side, and selling it like something new. I see...
  11. #51  
    No, actually it's more like setting up a one stop shop for people to discover and buy software from. But feel free to keep spinning that as a negative.
  12. #52  
    Quote Originally Posted by rsanchez1 View Post
    Oh, so it's like taking a sandwich with burnt crusts, flipping the burnt crust over to the unburned side, and selling it like something new. I see...
    What?! All Apple has done is created a place for developers to list their applications and make the point of sale. It's a consolidated list, nothing more, nothing less. It's great.

    I've been a Mac user now for 2.5 years and I've discovered a lot of new programs through this new app store that I may have never known about. Swackett is one of them: swackett on the Mac App Store
  13. #53  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    No, actually it's more like setting up a one stop shop for people to discover and buy software from. But feel free to keep spinhning that as a negative.
    How about as a non-factor?
  14. #54  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    How about as a non-factor?
    For users like us? Probably. At least for the time being.

    I think I'll be more likely to upgrade to iLife '12 via the App Store rather than buying a boxed copy, though.
  15. #55  
    Fair enough. I am a "PC". I use a variety of software for a variety of purposes - all legal and paid for. But I haven't bought Windows software in years.
  16. #56  
    Quote Originally Posted by sq5 View Post
    While the new mac app store is no doubt interesting, lets not give Apple TOO much credit here as always. The "App Store" methodology of getting programs on a desktop has been around for a long time on Ubuntu Linux, and many other platforms. You even get a good taste of it on Windows if you've ever played games on the Steam network.
    I'd also add that steam has also shown that consumers will buy computer programs through an online store provided DRM is handled well (which it mostly is with steam, though there are some issues when games have multiple layers; ie steam+something else).
  17. #57  
    In addition to the piracy issues that will benefit developers, it also kills the used market, which is probably not that big.

    Can you install software from multiple profiles onto one user account so that if you had purchased one application and your wife had another, that you could use them together in the same user account?

    Also, Is there a limit to the number of computers that you can authorize like there is in itunes? Having had a couple of dead hard drives in my past, what happens if you can't deauthorize a computer, do you lose a license?

    I know these are minor issues, but I am interested to hear how they handle them.
  18. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    It was tongue in cheek. Try not to take me more seriously than I take myself. snip..
    Easy to do. You brought and play Angry Birds on a desktop.

    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    One of the advantages of this for the software developer, of course, will be controlling piracy more effectively.
    How did the App Store stop piracy of Iphone apps? I seem to remember to infamous websites where you could get anything, granted on a JB'd iphone. Android same thing. There will be just that many more pirated apps available, probably soon, on torrents and newsgroups. Is there something different in how the MAC apps purchased reside on the MAC? Just asking...

    Update:
    Looks like I was not to far off the mark:Mac App Store DRM already cracked

    There are some other hits, but I don't want to link as they describe methods of getting apps.
    Last edited by sinsin07; 01/06/2011 at 07:34 PM.
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