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  1.    #1  
    Does anyone else think that there will be a log-jam of smartphones and tablets at the carriers? Even Vizio is getting into the smartphone and tablet market.

    Vizio Tablet hands-on preview -- Engadget
    Vizio Phone hands-on preview -- Engadget

    Vizio is the brand you see at the warehouse club that is one tier below the Samsung, Panasonic, and Sony but usually priced to move. The design quality of these devices seem to be fairly good.

    One has to wonder whether the carriers will start to be more selective about what they offer (hello Pre 2?). I don't think all of the major manufacturers are going to be able to stay in the smartphone and tablet business for long without significant carrier support.
  2. #2  
    I have had Vizio stuff forever, and the quality is always top notch. From what I have read about Vizio mobile products, the quality of the pre build stuff is fantastic.

    Now that being said, I would bet that Vizio is not going after the mobile market with the same gusto as would an HTC/HP/Microsoft/Apple etc.

    I would bet that most of these phone being announced are going to be spread out over 2011 and early 2012. No log jam expected.
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  3. #3  
    I think devices developed with the carrier will get priority and have the best chance at survival. When the Sprint product guy was at The Engadget Show, he said they try to be picky and customize their offerings instead of walking into a room and saying 'We want that" and offering said device however many months later.

    HP is going to have to play that game.
  4.    #4  
    The carriers are definitely in a great position when it comes to selecting smartphones with the exception of the iPhone. They are almost certainly in a position to demand some kind of differentiation and . . . wait for it . . . exclusivity. I see no reason why any carrier has to agree to promote and sell something that is also available next door. I think this idea that HP is going to create a superphone for all carriers is a pipe dream. There's going to be an exclusivity period for one particular carrier.

    I agree that HP definitely is going to have to play this game. We only have three or four major carriers in this country and they don't have to offer any phone that doesn't draw in new customers and/or retain existing ones in a significant way.
  5. #5  
    Isn't this just a consequence of the way phones in the US are marketed and sold? In the rest of the world aren't phones more of a commodity that people buy outright and then use on whatever network they want? I would love to see the carrier subsidy model dwindle and a more device centric one reign but I am not holding my breath.
  6.    #6  
    After this year's CES announcement, I wonder if there will be any major consumer electronics manufacturer that isn't developing a tablet.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    The carriers are definitely in a great position when it comes to selecting smartphones with the exception of the iPhone. They are almost certainly in a position to demand some kind of differentiation and . . . wait for it . . . exclusivity. I see no reason why any carrier has to agree to promote and sell something that is also available next door. I think this idea that HP is going to create a superphone for all carriers is a pipe dream. There's going to be an exclusivity period for one particular carrier.

    I agree that HP definitely is going to have to play this game. We only have three or four major carriers in this country and they don't have to offer any phone that doesn't draw in new customers and/or retain existing ones in a significant way.
    Samsung pretty provided the blueprint of how to win at the modern smartphone game across all carriers, and they did it with an older version of Android, no brand equity, and a failed device or two preceding it (e.g. the Samsung Behold II).

    HP could indeed provide a "superphone" across all carriers, but it will need to use this model.
  8. #8  
    Also, hope they have a dog in the 'World's greatest Display" race. Between LG's newly announced NOVA superbright screen tech, SuperAMOLED, and the Retina Display, they have their work cut out for them.
  9.    #9  
    You've got to ask yourself, then, how Samsung was able to get all three carriers to release simultaneously given their shortcomings. There was probably some Android first-mover advantage for both their smartphone and their tablet. I also suspect that they offered a strategic low price to the carriers. In return, they got a tremendous boost in market share. That first-mover advantage doesn't really exist anymore and the strategic low price may not be sustainable long-term. It's hard to imagine how HP replicates this. Also, I don't know whether HP traditionally allows any re-branding of any of their products like Samsung does.
  10.    #10  
    AT&T has mentioned today at CES that it's prepping to launch some 12 Android devices this year -- presumably a mix of phones and tablets, many of which have been announced here today at the carrier's developer event. For the mathematically challenged, that works out to one a month on average -- a pretty aggressive pace and a sign that Android's showing no signs of slowing down in terms of carrier and manufacturer adoption. Though the hardware looks great, none of AT&T's Android announcements so far here feature a stock UI experience -- sure, nothing they've done in the past year suggests they're keen to offer a stock device, but with 12 in the pipe, surely just one of 'em can go skinless?

    AT&T launching 12 Android devices in 2011 -- Engadget
  11. #11  
    All I know is that it cant be bad for consumers.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    Samsung pretty provided the blueprint of how to win at the modern smartphone game across all carriers, and they did it with an older version of Android, no brand equity, and a failed device or two preceding it (e.g. the Samsung Behold II).

    HP could indeed provide a "superphone" across all carriers, but it will need to use this model.
    Seems like most still prefer the EVO to the Epic as well. (not sure if you were counting that in your failed devices or not)
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Titan078 View Post
    Seems like most still prefer the EVO to the Epic as well. (not sure if you were counting that in your failed devices or not)
    I don't think the Epic or any Galaxy S device is failed. The Evo got there first and had the bulk of Sprint's promotion behind it. The Epic costs more, has a slide out keyboard (which actually limits appeal these days), and is only promoted by Samsung. Nonetheless, Samsung, not HTC, is the leading Android manufacturer.
  14. #14  
    there isn't as much of a log-jam for adding additional phones from the same manufacturer. Another HTC phone that runs 2.2 isn't that big of a deal compared to adding a Nokia/Meego to a carrier that doesn't currently carry anything from Nokia.

    Once they are supporting webOS, the next models are easier to add. Palm's challenge is to get a high enough place in line that they can get it deployed by the carrier before it becomes obsolete, because carriers will prioritize the best selling phones first...

    I'd hate to be the guy next in line after the iPhone at Verizon...
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    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Unclevanya View Post
    Isn't this just a consequence of the way phones in the US are marketed and sold? In the rest of the world aren't phones more of a commodity that people buy outright and then use on whatever network they want? I would love to see the carrier subsidy model dwindle and a more device centric one reign but I am not holding my breath.
    Yes and no, low-end phones are bought outright but most high-end smart-phones are still bought locked under carrier subsidy. However what's happening with android is that as the bottom-feeders rush in, you will see cheap smart-phones displacing unlocked dumb-phones.

    My current phone is the ZTE Blade, it cost me 70 ($120) with no contract - it's a perfectly capable android phone that does everything that most people will want to do. Leaving aside the US and your weird networks, what will happen in most places is that while people will still buy carrier subsided phones from a limited range of suppliers at the top end of the market, the ability of the average consumer to pick up a half-decent smartphone at the local supermarket will increase significantly. Either the other oses (expect for Apple) will mimic android and have smart-phones at all price-points or they will simply have to concede large chunks of the market.

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