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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by wellwellwell11 View Post
    no problem, and for the record I myself have picked up one of HP's dual core AMD Turion II Pavillion laptops, and I must say with the powerful specs under the hood, I get over 7 hours of battery life alone on it. Thats webbrowsing, recording, and playing light videos on it. So not only are the HP's engineers used to using dual core chipsets, they also understand how to build products (hardware wise). IMO they make the best laptops, with the best overall specs.
    usually best prices to if you catch them on sale. That being said my dv8t i7 gets about 2.5 hours of battery life....but thats the way i like it
  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by not-yet-pre View Post
    There is a misconception that just because an item is small is doesn’t require much power. If you look at laptop computers – they only have a battery life of a few hours. Tablets and pads have about the same amount of power demands but are in a smaller case with less space for batteries.

    People also tend to think that a smartphone should have an equivalent battery life of a feature phone because they are about the same size. Smartphones are pocket computers that have the demands of multiple processors, radios and displays.

    My solution to my power requirements for my laptops and smartphones is the same; keep a charger handy. I seldom use my laptop computer when it is not plugged into a power supply and I have touchstones in my cars, at my office, on my home computer desk and by my bed for my Pre Plus.


    People want more power in their mobile devices but need to realize that more computing power = more battery required
    Umm no. Most tablets are based on the ARM architecture, which has a much lower power footprint than the x86 architecture used in Mac and Windows laptops. They don't have similar power requirements at all.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Few hours? My MacBook Pro gets around 7 hours of battery on average. My MacBook Air gets even better (8-10 hours).

    If a tablet gets less than 6-8 hours of battery life, it's of no interest to me, especially considering there are products currently on the market that get much better than that.
    Exactly. Mobile devices should get at least 6-8 hours, especially when it's 7 inches and has enough room for a larger battery.

    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    30% of all stats are made up 45% of the time just like this very statement AND your "minus 1.5-3 hours for multitasking".

    Finding sufficient ways to allow for multiple tasks with today's battery tech is a good thing. Every single iOS device user that I've met are perfectly happy with their particular brand of multi-tasking. In fact, the only people I've met that complain about multi-tasking on iOS are webOS users (and I used to be one of them, i.e. both a webOS user and an "iOS does not have true multi-tasking" complainer). Apple built a slightly better battery, stuffed the iPad to the rim with it AND found a way to allow users to multi-task (to most of the users' satisfaction) such that they get maximum battery life. It's not perfect but until the Ancients give us portable ZPMs, it is good, very good.
    My problem with iOS multi tasking isn't that it's not true multi tasking, whatever that is. My problem is how you do it. I had my iPod touch with iOS 4 for 3-4 months thinking multi tasking couldn't happen on my device. I tried doing it the way it was described on the internet but it wouldn't work, finally i read somewhere my iPod cant multi task. Then one day I accidentally tapped the home button twice and voila, there is multi tasking.

    It's like Apple decided they needed to make it hard to figure out. I never had to accidentally figure out how to multi task with my mac. With the Pre, it's a lot easier to stumble on the multi tasking and once you figure that out, its even easier to learn to kill an app. I just recently learned that I can actually kill app's on my iPod so they don't run in the background. Why did it take so long to figure this out, why can't it be part of the OS? Thats my biggest problem with it. Plus, sometimes I double tap that home button to slow and end up going to home screen. However the iOS multi task is far better then what BlackBerry OS has and Windows Phone 7 can't multi task, right? So iOS isn't the worst, just not the best.
  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by Titan078 View Post
    wellwellwell11 certainly has better facts than me, but i also believe you can clock a Duel core lower to get better performance and better battery life. Not sure where i heard it, but it makes sense to me! Parallel serial diminishing returns blah blah...
    I believe your correct, I too have heard that.
  5. #45  
    iOS can still get bogged down a bit, and it helps when I close apps from the fast app switching widget. So, apples version of multitasking has affected performance and battery a bit. Imagine how much worse it would be if it did true multitasking. The iPad would most def need more than the 250 or so mb of ram that it has.

    I do wish they included a faster method to close apps. When u hold down an icon to be able to close apps, u can't enter apps till u exit that closing phase. Sometimes I wish I could swipe up to close, lol
  6. #46  
    This isn't fully implemented in webos either, but side by side apps. At least it's faster with webos advanced gestures to swipe over an application to grab data and go back.
  7.    #47  
    Can someone give a more specific example of a multitasking use-case that IOS does not do (or well)?
    Here is one that I encountered, I don't know if it applies to iOS as I have not used it, but it certainly applies to android.

    I do a lot of driving. I use Dr Podder and Sprint navigation at the same time. Both play audio at the same time. When the navigation lady talks, she turns down the dr podder audio, not all the way, just enough that she can be heard clearly. If my phone rings, all the audio goes down. When I end the call, every thing is as it was. Some times I get stuck in traffic a long time and while I am at a stand still I check email or my rss reader. I can do all that with out any issues, switching is simple. This is all built into the OS, no special requirements from the developers.

    Here is how it works on Android. set up navigtion, go to the pod cast app. navigation stops. go back to the navigation app, it has lost my place, set up the trip again, my pod cast has stopped, go to pod cast app, it has lost my place, set up my pod cast again, go to email or a web page, lose everything, repeat.

    Maybe someone can see how that would work out on iOS, it probably depends on which apps you choose, they have to be coded specially to act this way by the developer, I am not sure it is even really possible for GPS navigation to work at the same time as a pod cast app.

    I would be interested in a real response to this, backed up with actual experimentation on an iOS device. Simply stating it works won't do. how would iOS stack up in a situation like this one.
    Palm 1000 > Palm Pro > Palm III > Palm IIIe X 3 > Palm IIIc > Palm TT > HTC Wizard > HTC Blue Angel > Palm TX > Zier 31 > Palm T3 > Palm Pre > FrankenPre 2 > TouchPad/Droid/Ubuntu > TP/ICS
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by patricksmangan View Post
    iOS can still get bogged down a bit, and it helps when I close apps from the fast app switching widget. So, apples version of multitasking has affected performance and battery a bit. Imagine how much worse it would be if it did true multitasking. The iPad would most def need more than the 250 or so mb of ram that it has.

    I do wish they included a faster method to close apps. When u hold down an icon to be able to close apps, u can't enter apps till u exit that closing phase. Sometimes I wish I could swipe up to close, lol
    I agree with you, it would seem Apple would have made a swipe gesture to remove things from the multitask bar. Double Press, Hold Icon, wait for wiggle, too many steps.
  9.    #49  
    Which version of Android (and which device) are you using?
    It was a samsung intercept, Android 2.1
    Palm 1000 > Palm Pro > Palm III > Palm IIIe X 3 > Palm IIIc > Palm TT > HTC Wizard > HTC Blue Angel > Palm TX > Zier 31 > Palm T3 > Palm Pre > FrankenPre 2 > TouchPad/Droid/Ubuntu > TP/ICS
  10. #50  
    I wonder if there was/is something going on that device. I don't recall having any of those issues with Android 2.1 on the EVO before it got upgraded to Froyo.
  11.    #51  
    I tried to upgrade to froyo but samsung has pulled the upgrade because it was bricking phones.
    Palm 1000 > Palm Pro > Palm III > Palm IIIe X 3 > Palm IIIc > Palm TT > HTC Wizard > HTC Blue Angel > Palm TX > Zier 31 > Palm T3 > Palm Pre > FrankenPre 2 > TouchPad/Droid/Ubuntu > TP/ICS
  12. #52  
    Anyways..... BACK to the topic at hand. RIM released statement about this.

    "Any testing or observation of battery life to date by anyone outside of RIM would have been performed using pre-beta units that were built without power management implemented. RIM is on track with its schedule to optimize the BlackBerry PlayBook's battery life and looks forward to providing customers with a professional grade tablet that offers superior performance with comparable battery life."

    RIM Official Statement Regarding Rumors of Poor Battery Life on the BlackBerry PlayBook | CrackBerry.com
    Current: Palm Pre 2
    History: [Palm] Pre Plus - [IOS] iPhone 3GS, iPhone 3G - [Blackberry] Pearl 8120, Storm 9530, Bold 9000, Bold 9700, Torch 9800 - [WP7] HTC HD7S - [WM] HTC Fuze - [Android] HTC Aria
  13. #53  
    according to wired.com the playbook will be doa:

    DOA: Blackberry PlayBook to Ship Without Mail, Messaging or Contacts | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

    palm mentioned at end of article
  14. #54  
    Without Mail, Contacts or Messaging it will be DOA for most people (xcept RIM diehards).

    It really seems to be rushed to the market. Probably RIM should've joined HP and bring a more polished device (SW, not HW). The SDK for the Playbook is not even out and this is supposed to launch in six days? Oh dear...
    Last edited by FischOderAal; 04/08/2011 at 09:39 AM.
  15. #55  
    According to Barrons the Playbook is not DOA: A Serious Challenge to iPad2: - Barrons.com
    Quote Originally Posted by protofa View Post
    according to wired.com the playbook will be doa:

    DOA: Blackberry PlayBook to Ship Without Mail, Messaging or Contacts | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

    palm mentioned at end of article
  16. #56  
    Quote Originally Posted by HelloNNNewman View Post
    What we really need is some sort of a new X-Prize for companies to develop and expand battery technology instead of ships for Mars. Let's conquer this little issue first!
    Maybe the solution for better battery life can be found on Mars?

    :P

    (Sorry, I just had to)

    Seriously, though.. you are right.. corporate R&D priorities tend to be irrational at times.
    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  17. #57  
    until it has actual PIM applications without the need of a blackberry then it is dead on arrival no matter the batterylife. Once it actually gets PIM then maybe it might have a chance but they should never launch the device without those.
  18. #58  
    i dont know why RIM wants to limit playbook users to existing BB users. Which is what they are doing here.

    More worrisome is the price, seeing android tablets going for $350, $400. a $499 playbook seems pretty pricy.
  19. #59  
    $500 and you have to own a BlackBerry.

    Hopefully the PlayBook has really big fonts for their target demographic.

    Maybe their market won't even realize that it's nearly $200 too high?
  20. #60  
    Hi all,

    This isn't my opinion I am just posting what I think are interesting comments...David Pouge's comments about the lack of Apps may be a problem for Palm/HP's TouchhPad, unless HP hits the ground running, (it seems as if they are but we will know more in the weeks to follow.

    Take care as always,

    Jay

    BlackBerry PlayBook: Mixed bag of reviews, but enough to defend the enterprise
    By Larry Dignan | April 14, 2011, 6:41am PDT

    BlackBerry PlayBook: Mixed bag of reviews, but enough to defend the enterprise | ZDNet

    Research in Motion’s BlackBerry PlayBook appears to be a promising yet flawed—almost unfinished—device and the reviews are so-so. Nevertheless, there are enough goodies to keep corporate customers interested.

    Among the key takeaways:

    Walt Mossberg, WSJ: “RIM says it is planning to add built-in cellular data, email, contacts, calendar and the other missing core features to the PlayBook this summer, via software updates. But until then, I can’t recommend the PlayBook over a fully standalone tablet, except possibly for folks whose BlackBerrys never leave their sides.”
    David Pogue, New York Times: “For now, the PlayBook’s motto might be, “There’s no app for that.” No existing apps run on this all-new operating system, not even BlackBerry phone apps. (R.I.M. says an emulator that will run BlackBerry apps will come later this year.)”
    Tim Stevens, Engadget: “Running the show is a dual-core, 1GHz TI OMAP processor that’s expertly massaged and manipulated by the QNX OS here. QNX is a decidedly efficient and bulletproof operating system that powers everything from jet fighters to, well, little black tablets.”
    Mark Spoonauer, Laptop Mag: “The BlackBerry Tablet OS is a fresh new platform leveraging two key acquisitions: QNX (for its reliability and Flash support) and TAT (for its interface expertise). Together, these ingredients create an environment that’s optimized for multitasking.”
    CNet’s Donald Bell: “The BlackBerry PlayBook ably showcases RIM’s powerful new mobile operating system, but its middling size diminishes many of its best features.”

    Sorting through these reviews you find that there are things the PlayBook does well—BlackBerry Bridge, Flash, HDMI to TV, hardware finish, QNX—and things that are lacking such as apps and the general feeling that the tablet isn’t quite complete.

    In other words, PlayBook is an imperfect device that has a ton of potential. I’m going to view these reviews through one prism: Is the PlayBook enough to defend its enterprise turf? The answer appears to be possibly. Here’s why:

    BlackBerry Bridge: Most of the reviews thought that BlackBerry Bridge was
    impressive, but also the biggest hole for RIM to fill. In a nutshell, you can pair BlackBerry with the PlayBook. The two devices connect via Bluetooth and applications are enabled. If you have a BlackBerry then this is a nice feature. If not, you’re wondering why there isn’t a native email, calendar and contact app. For the enterprise—land of the BlackBerry—this bridge between devices may be handy. We ‘ll count Bridge as an asset.

    PowerPoint presentations look good. I know a lot of tech’s chattering class thinks PowerPoint is irrelevant. But in the real world, PowerPoint is a big deal in corporations. The PlayBook’s HDMI cable allows you to hook it up to a projector or TV and deliver a presentation. The catch is that the PlayBook can show you the notes and thumbnails while the big screen shows the rest of the world your presentation. Most of the reviews have glossed over the PowerPoint punch. It matters a lot and makes the PlayBook a notable enterprise tool. RIM’s PowerPoint prowess also highlights how Microsoft is snoozing on tablets. Shouldn’t Microsoft be leading the tablet presentation charge?

    Multitasking. The reviews generally had strong things to say about RIM’s QNX operating system. Sure, the QNX borrows from HP’s WebOS and Apple’s iPad, but it multitasks well and that’ll matter to the enterprise.

    Security. While BlackBerry Bridge is a weakness—it’s still baffling to me th at there are no native email clients—for IT types Bridge gives administrators security control. There’s nothing on your PlayBook because all the corporate stuff is on the BlackBerry, which can be wiped.

    Add it up and the PlayBook presents quite a divergence. Initial reviews may pan the device. Consumers may pan the device. The enterprise, however, gets just enough to stay interested and perhaps postpone those iPad deployments. If RIM can keep Android, HP and Apple away from its enterprise turf, the PlayBook is a success—even if it isn’t a best seller at Best Buy.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
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