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  1.    #1  
    Yet another great post from Gruber: Daring Fireball: The iOS and Android App Economies

    Let me know what your thoughts are and how this correlates with webOS.
  2. #2  
    Does Android have anything comparable to Homebrew Apps, Web/Beta apps, patches, etc.?
    My device history:

    - Jim J.

    (On Sprint for many years)
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by jjeffcoat View Post
    Does Android have anything comparable to Homebrew Apps, Web/Beta apps, patches, etc.?
    Android lets you sideload apps, so you can run betas like Firefox or Dolphin Mini. There is almost no need for homebrew between the incredible selection in the App Market and what's done on custom ROMs from XDA developers. Same goes for patches. There's no point since it's infinitely configurable out of the box.

    As for the article, I agree. It's a great read. But I guess you have to decide what's more important: Instagram, Hipstamatic, and Infinity Blade-style exclusive apps or having complete control over your device and the way it gives you information.

    The ideal platform would have both, but Android's current configuration is too sprawling to allow the same level of super iOS apps to flourish across all devices. iOS' current configuration is too rigid to allow the customization, notifications, and information flow the way Android does.
  4. #4  
    Please be sure to read his other blog post:

    Where Are the Android Killer Apps, when evaluating this one. It might well be the best article ever written on the subject.

    This is what I have been saying all along. There is a reason the most innovative and interesting mobile apps are made for iOS and not other platforms. It has nothing to do with marketshare or money. Developers have been beating down Apple's door long before there was any money to be made. This kind of excitement and creativity simply can never be ported. It is native to a platform.

    The best exclusive Android stuff seems to be geared towards fixing, polishing, or tweaking the system, much like Homebrew. In iOS, the energy goes towards doing interesting things that have nothing to do with the OS. It is the difference between the super car that spends more time getting tweaked than on the road, and the luxury car that spends more time on the road than getting tweaked.

    wOS can't survive as the hobbyist OS. Homebrew will never compete with iOS jailbreak or the Android market, which, of itself, is one big jailbreak. wOS also cannot survive on ports. wOS has to be the place where original thinkers come to showcase their ideas. If they can't do that, Palm phones will have to thrive on volume and try to compete in the "free" market. Perhaps they will have better luck attracting advertisers than developers.
  5. #5  
    Although still a webOS fan, I'm starting to consider my long term options. Just registered today on Android Central so I can access their forums also.
    My device history:

    - Jim J.

    (On Sprint for many years)
  6. #6  
    Eh if games are your Killer apps for your phone, you are silly if you don't own an iPhone.

    I barely plays games on my portable devices. Just isn't my thing. Just have a few to pass the time.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Please be sure to read his other blog post:

    Where Are the Android Killer Apps, when evaluating this one. It might well be the best article ever written on the subject.

    This is what I have been saying all along. There is a reason the most innovative and interesting mobile apps are made for iOS and not other platforms. It has nothing to do with marketshare or money. Developers have been beating down Apple's door long before there was any money to be made. This kind of excitement and creativity simply can never be ported. It is native to a platform.

    The best exclusive Android stuff seems to be geared towards fixing, polishing, or tweaking the system, much like Homebrew. In iOS, the energy goes towards doing interesting things that have nothing to do with the OS. It is the difference between the super car that spends more time getting tweaked than on the road, and the luxury car that spends more time on the road than getting tweaked.
    I...can't disagree. But I do love tweaking and customizing the look and feel of my phone. Constantly. Making it mine, so to speak. iOS is just extremely ubiquitous and generic for me at this point. There was a time a while back when I would love to stop by the Apple store in our local mall to play around on various bits of hardware. Now, we're on our second iPod touch, and aside from a time wasting game app for my wife like Plants vs. Zombies or Angry Birds, we don't bother with the apps or the iTunes store at all. And since getting an Epic, I've grown to dislike the iPod/iPhone screen

    I don't even really give Android's App Market its proper due. I only ever get turned onto cool third party apps like Pulse or VLingo through reading Gizmodo/Lifehacker.

    wOS can't survive as the hobbyist OS. Homebrew will never compete with iOS jailbreak or the Android market, which, of itself, is one big jailbreak. wOS also cannot survive on ports. wOS has to be the place where original thinkers come to showcase their ideas. If they can't do that, Palm phones will have to thrive on volume and try to compete in the "free" market. Perhaps they will have better luck attracting advertisers than developers.
    Well, if nothing else, HP will subsidize the existence of the platform. Maybe more so for slates and netbooks...but they'll give it a few goes to try and make the investment worthwhile. Something or other has to coalesce with the acquisition spree they've been on, and hopefully a WebOS ecosystem will be the result.

    But first, they've got to learn how to build excitement in this space. I think they're hurting more there than anywhere else at the moment.
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    #8  
    A final thought, regarding Android’s relative weakness as a software platform. iOS’s exclusivity for a bunch of big-name mobile games — Need for Speed Undercover, Star Wars: Battle for Hoth, Monopoly, Tetris, The Sims, Assassin’s Creed — has been broken. Not by Android, where none of these games exist, but by Windows Phone 7, a one-month-old platform.
    I've got the sims and need for speed and assassins creed. And I've played NfS on android phones, pretty sure EA develops for both platforms now. Even though ios is the leading platform. Does this guy actually know anything?

    EDIT: also i don't trust anyone who has a blog without comments
  9. #9  
    I can do enough tweaking and what not through jailbreaking on the iphone to satisfy that personal need. After that i still have what most iphone mainstreamers get to enjoy.

    There's not much i'm missing that is unique to other platforms.

    I question whether HP really has the leadership to be a viable smartphone/tablet player in the consumer market. Ruby's in over his head and should get back in the design room.
  10. kalex's Avatar
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    #10  
    I could care less about exclusive android apps. What I care about is apps that I use are available for me. So far every app that I use is available on IOS and Android and not on WebOS
  11. lupos's Avatar
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    #11  
    also webos does have some very good exclusive apps. I love geostrings (i know there are similar ones on other platforms but it was very unique at the time of its release) and this just poped up on the front page

    http://www.precentral.net/exclusive-...credible-webos
  12.    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by lupos View Post
    also webos does have some very good exclusive apps. I love geostrings (i know there are similar ones on other platforms but it was very unique at the time of its release) and this just poped up on the front page

    http://www.precentral.net/exclusive-...credible-webos
    That's nothing new for other platforms. There are 100's of apps on iOS that do just this. Also, on Android HTC has an app that comes standard in Sense that unifies your Twitter/Facebook stream.

    This is just the first of its kind for webOS.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    That's nothing new for other platforms. There are 100's of apps on iOS that do just this. Also, on Android HTC has an app that comes standard in Sense that unifies your Twitter/Facebook stream.

    This is just the first of its kind for webOS.
    Oh, yeah... But what about the rest of the app's features?

    (Oh, wait, this thread is about how bad is webOS...)

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Newness Developments apps:

  14. #14  
    Played around with my daughter's Samsung Intercept for about an hour this morning. Very frustrating - stuff that seems so easy and intuitive on webOS is convoluted and confusing on Android. Perhaps there's a steeper learning curve, or maybe I'm just plain stupid.

    And the more I tried typing on the landscape keyboard, the more frustrating it became. Nothing seemed where it was supposed to be, constantly hitting the wrong letter. The on-screen keyboard was no better, if anything worse.

    Looked through their app market and was pleased to see that RadioTime is there. Couldn't find drPodder though... I guess they have other stuff for podcasts. Didn't bother searching for Epocrates or Skyscape apps, but I know they're there.

    I plan to play with an Epic the next time I'm at a Sprint store... I understand that it has a better screen, keyboard, and overall better specs than the Intercept.

    Really would be interested in the Droid Pro or Motorola Spice, but the folks at Android Central tell me that the chance of those coming to Sprint is about zilch.

    Getting very bummed these days.
    My device history:

    - Jim J.

    (On Sprint for many years)
  15.    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by deCorvett View Post
    Oh, yeah... But what about the rest of the app's features?

    (Oh, wait, this thread is about how bad is webOS...)

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    No one said anything about this being a thread about how bad webOS is, it's a thread about putting things into perspective.

    On a serious note, which features would you be referring to?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by jjeffcoat View Post
    Played around with my daughter's Samsung Intercept for about an hour this morning. Very frustrating...

    And the more I tried typing on the landscape keyboard...

    RadioTime...drPodder though... I guess they have other stuff for podcasts...

    I plan to play with an Epic the next time I'm at a Sprint store... I understand that it has a better screen, keyboard, and overall better specs than the Intercept...
    JJ,

    Everything has better specs than an Intercept. Trying an Intercept to see what Android is like is like trying a Yugo to see what cars are like. It's low res, slow, a small screen, and ancient in Android terms. The Epic is beautiful but also see the EVO.

    Once you try a predictive onscreen keyboard like SwiftKey, it is hard to go back to a physical keyboard. You get so spoiled by it predicting your next word without you having to type at all it is hard to go back to having to type.

    Yes, Android has a podcast app or two. To see what apps are out there, search AppBrain. For "podcast" it has 402 apps. Filter on "Free" and sort by Rating to see the best. AppBrain also lets you see the All-Time Popular apps in each category.

    It's like going to toyland.

    - Craig
  17.    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by milominderbinder View Post
    JJ,Trying an Intercept to see what Android is like is like trying a Yugo to see what cars are like. It's low res, slow, a small screen, and ancient in Android terms. The Epic is beautiful but also see the EVO.
    Or, you could also say .. it's like giving someone a (stock) Pixi to demonstrate webOS and it being their first impression.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Or, you could also say .. it's like giving someone a (stock) Pixi to demonstrate webOS and it being their first impression.
    A stock Sprint (wifi-less) Pixi at that.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    No one said anything about this being a thread about how bad webOS is, it's a thread about putting things into perspective.

    On a serious note, which features would you be referring to?
    Seriously. You have no idea about what Incredible! Does but anyways you're bashing it as "old news".

    What about Neato! ? It's old news because "chrome to phone" exists but... What about "phone to Chrome"? It doesn't exists, as far as I know, but Neato! Does it.

    You can't bash here anything webOS related because "something similar" exists previously. If you do it, then don't comment the Glory of Android's search system on another thread, because Universal Search isn't "so 2008". It's "so 1996" (do you remember PalmOS?), and Voice Command is just an addition.

    (That without saying that search on Android devices is more than clunky. It works, but it's sloooooow (I'm talking about a Galaxy S, far from "a Pixi"), but you don't tell that.)

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Newness Developments apps:

  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by milominderbinder View Post
    JJ,

    Everything has better specs than an Intercept. Trying an Intercept to see what Android is like is like trying a Yugo to see what cars are like. It's low res, slow, a small screen, and ancient in Android terms. The Epic is beautiful but also see the EVO.

    Once you try a predictive onscreen keyboard like SwiftKey, it is hard to go back to a physical keyboard. You get so spoiled by it predicting your next word without you having to type at all it is hard to go back to having to type.

    - Craig
    Thanks for the pointers. Upon closer inspection I decided that the biggest problem with the keyboard on the Intercept is the way the space bar sits between the "V" and the "B". It looks like that has been corrected with the Epic, so perhaps I could get used to the wider keyboard. Still skeptical on whether I could get used to an onscreen keyboard; in any case I think the Evo is a little too large for my preference.

    Did I see you post somewhere else that you have an "*****'s guide" to Android for webOS users posted somewhere over at Android Central? I probably will need to check that out carefully if I switch to an Android device!
    Thanks,
    Jim
    My device history:

    - Jim J.

    (On Sprint for many years)
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